DEBT bombshell: Property industry owes government £2.42 billion

first_imgThe eye watering amounts of money lent by Chancellor Rishi Sunak to the property industry during the pandemic has been revealed within the latest Covid loans data.It reveals the total cost of the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS) and Bounce Back loans scheme paid to the ‘real estate sector’.Both schemes have provided financial support to businesses across the UK that are losing revenue and seeing their cashflow disrupted as a result of the Covid-19 outbreak.This includes all the services related to managing, buying, selling and renting residential and commercial property including land.Covid loansSome £204 million has been given to companies operating in these property industry sectors under CIBLS, and have come via 1,001 loans. But £2.21 billion in Bounce Back loans have also been distributed via 63,000 loans. This gives a total of £2.42 billion that companies, including many estate agencies, will have to pay back as the Covid loans hangover kicks in.Small Business Minister Paul Scully (pictured) says: “Throughout this crisis, we have backed business of all sizes in every corner of the UK.“The schemes put in place by the government-owned British Business Bank have provided some much-needed breathing space for businesses as they deal with the challenges posed by coronavirus.“Government support has helped firms right across Britain, not just in keeping businesses going but now enabling thousands to bounce back in a safe, Covid-secure manner.”The CBIL and Bounce Back loans have been provided through the government-owned own British Business Bank.Read more about how CBILS and Bounce Back loans work.British Business Bank Covid Loans bounce bank loans Chancellor Rishi Sunak CBILS December 18, 2020Nigel LewisOne commentJames Gibbs, Gibbs Gillespie Gibbs Gillespie 18th December 2020 at 1:04 pmBearing in mind the ££millions paid in tax over the years, its good to see the Gov’t helping out. Or in other words to prevent huge unemployment statistics.Log in to ReplyWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » COVID-19 news » DEBT bombshell: Property industry owes government £2.42 billion previous nextCOVID-19 newsDEBT bombshell: Property industry owes government £2.42 billionBritish Business Bank lending via CBILS and Bounce Back loans reveals eye-watering government financial support for industry.Nigel Lewis18th December 20201 Comment771 Viewslast_img read more

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Pediatric Nephrologist – Chief and Assistant/Associate/Full Professor (59824)

first_imgThe Department of Pediatrics at the University of Florida Collegeof Medicine – Jacksonville seeks applicants to fill a full-timeleadership position as the Division Chief of Pediatric Nephrology.The position may be at a non-tenure accruing level of Assistant,Associate, or Full Professor level on the multi missiontrack.Our Division currently has two (2) full-time faculty members whoare supported by an RN educator, a social worker, a dietician, andan administrative assistant. The Division of Pediatric Nephrologyworks in close collaboration with the University of FloridaDivision of Pediatric Rheumatology, and the Division of PediatricUrology at Nemours Children’s Specialty Services, and the pediatricrenal transplant program at UF Health Gainesville. The divisionprovides a complete range of inpatient and outpatient pediatricnephrology services, including management of patients with acuteand chronic kidney disease, inpatient and outpatient plasmapheresisservices, renal replacement therapy (continuous renal replacementtherapy, peritoneal dialysis, and hemodialysis – with and withoutECMO).The UF Health Gainesville program performs renal transplantation.Our division operates innovative clinical programs including alarge ambulatory blood pressure monitoring program. Additionally,members of the division participate in research collaborativestudies.This position requires: Fellowship training in Pediatric NephrologyABMS Board Certification in Pediatrics with a subspecialtycertificate in Pediatric NephrologyEligibility for unrestricted Florida Medical License andhospital credentialing Fellowship training in Pediatric NephrologyABMS Board Certification in Pediatrics with a subspecialtycertificate in Pediatric NephrologyEligibility for unrestricted Florida Medical License andhospital credentialing The successful candidate will demonstrate a history ofcollaborative practice; excellence in teaching residents, medicalstudents, and other healthcare workers; and a record of academicaccomplishment.The major responsibilities for this position will include providingcoordinated medical care for newborns, children and adolescentswith complex nephrology disorders in an outpatient PediatricMultispecialty Center, inpatient admissions and consultations,day-Hospital management, and shared night and weekend call.Education responsibilities include: teaching medical students andhouse staff as well as participating in the development of thepediatric nephrology program.Inpatient services are provided at Wolfson Children’s Hospital, a216 bed free standing dedicated children’s hospital located indowntown Jacksonville. Annually, over 80,000 patients visits tohospital, over 11,000 surgeries, about 12,000 children hospitalizedand over 70,000 visits to the area’s only Children’s EmergencyCenters.The University of Florida physician practice provides a wide rangeof services to one of the largest mixed-specialty practices in thesoutheastern United States, and offers a great North Floridalifestyle with countless recreational activities, museums,orchestras and professional and amateur sports. Long beloved by itsresidents, Jacksonville, FL, is recognized as one of the mostdesirable cities in which to live and work.The University of Florida College of Medicine-Jacksonville is thelargest of the three UF colleges – medicine, nursing and pharmacy -located on the approximately 110-acre UF HealthJacksonville campus. The college’s 17 clinicalscience departments house more than 400 faculty members and 360residents and fellows. The college offers 34 accredited graduatemedical education programs. In addition to graduate medicaleducation, clinical rotations in all the major disciplines areprovided for students from the UF College of Medicine inGainesville.Visit thislink to watch a video highlighting our college’s academic andmedical offerings.For practicing physicians, the college offers a continuing medicaleducation program that recruits national and international speakerswho are well known and respected in their fields. The campus’faculty, residents and fellows are active in clinical research.Residents and fellows regularly present their findings at locationsacross the country and publish their projects in well-knownpublications.University of Florida Health Jacksonville is a private,not-for-profit hospital affiliated with the University of FloridaHealth Science Center campuses in Jacksonville and Gainesville . With more than 5,000faculty and staff, the University of Florida Health ScienceCenter–Jacksonville and UF Health Jacksonville form the region’spremier academic health center–UF Health, a leader in the educationof health professionals, a hub for clinical research and a uniqueprovider of high-quality patient care.Located in North Jacksonville is UF Health North, the onlyfull-service hospital in North Jacksonville. The state-of-the-arthospital at UF Health North offers conveniently located,high-quality health care to patients across Northeast Florida andSoutheast Georgia. It offers a wide range of inpatient andoutpatient services unavailable anywhere else in NorthJacksonville, provided by UF Health and community physicians. Thehospital features all-private rooms, which studies show promotehealing and improve the patient experience. Patient engagementtechnology in patient suites allows for easy meal ordering, TVcontrol and access to nurses. The hospital is adjacent to theexisting medical office building, where UF Health providers offermore than 20 specialties, including pediatrics and women’s healthservices. The campus is located on Max Leggett Parkway close toJacksonville International Airport, approximately 15 minutes fromNassau County and less than 30 minutes from Georgia. For moreinformation, visit http://north.ufhealthjax.org/.Located on Florida’s First Coast, Jacksonville is one of thelargest cities in land area in the United States. The city providesan eclectic combination of southern hospitality, business andrecreational paradise. More than 1 million people live in thefive-county area known as Florida’s First Coast. The area offerssomething for everyone, with a temperate climate incorporatingseasonal changes, miles of beautiful waterways and beaches, and amyriad of public facilities for work and play.For more information about Jacksonville, visit http://hscj.ufl.edu/college-of-medicine/administrative-affairs/AboutJacksonville.aspx The Search Committee will begin reviewing applications on March 13,2020. Please provide letter of intent and Curriculum Vitae.The final candidate will be required to provide official transcriptto the hiring department upon hire. A transcript will not beconsidered “official” if a designation of “Issued to Student” isvisible. Degrees earned from an education institution outside ofthe United States are required to be evaluated by a professionalcredentialing service provider approved by National Association ofCredential Evaluation Services (NACES), which can be found athttp://www.naces.org/If an accommodation due to a disability is needed to apply for thisposition, please call 352-392-2477 or the Florida Relay System at800-955-8771 (TDD). Hiring is contingent upon eligibility to workin the US. Searches are conducted in accordance with Florida’sSunshine Law.#category=35The University of Florida is committed to non-discrimination withrespect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex,sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, marital status,national origin, political opinions or affiliations, geneticinformation and veteran status in all aspects of employmentincluding recruitment, hiring, promotions, transfers, discipline,terminations, wage and salary administration, benefits, andtraining.last_img read more

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Elton John Will Returns To Evansville For A One Night Only Performance At Ford…

first_imgFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Elton John Will Returns To Evansville For A One Night Only Performance At Ford Center On SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2017 EVANSVILLE, INEVANSVILLE, IN – Elton John and his band return to Evansville for one performance at Ford Center on Saturday, November 11, 2017 as part of a 6-city concert tour that will feature iconic hits and classic album tracks from throughout his incredible ve-decade career, as well as selected tracks from his latest release, Wonderful Crazy Night.The public on-sale will begin Friday, May 19 at 10 a.m. (CST). Visit Ticketmaster.com for more information.“The simple truth is I want to spend more time with my family and less time touring,” said Elton. “I am all too aware of how precious the time ahead is. My sons are growing up so quickly. Their early years are just ying by and I want to be there with them.”Elton John’s band features Nigel Olsson (part of Elton’s original three-piece band) on drums, Davey Johnstone (who rst recorded with Elton in 1971 and joined the band a year later) on guitar, John Mahon on percussion, Kim Bullard on keyboards, and Matt Bissonette on bass.One of the most successful artists on the road today, Elton and his band perform a concert you will never forget:the entire audience singing along to much-loved classic songs such as “Your Song,” “Rocket Man,” “Bennie and the Jets,” “Philadelphia Freedom,” “Crocodile Rock,” “Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on Me,” and many more.“Fans are still talking about Elton John’s unforgettable performance when all he needed was his piano to put on one of the best shows that has been to Evansville,” said Ford Center Executive Director, Scott Schoenike. “In 2012, Elton John was one of the very rst concerts Ford Center hosted, and now we get to have him back onthe same day we will be celebrating our six year anniversary.”The monumental career of international singer/songwriter and performer Elton John spans ve decades. He is oneof the top-selling solo artists of all time, with 38 gold records and 31 platinum albums, 29 consecutive Top 40 hits,and he has sold more than 250 million records worldwide. John holds the record for the biggest selling single of all time, “Candle in the Wind 1997,” which sold over 33 million copies. Since launching his rst tour in 1970, he has over4,000 performances in more than 80 countries to his credit.last_img read more

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Press release: Ofsted Chief Inspector launches her second Annual Report on state of education and children’s care in England

first_img As long as children are attending schools that are perpetually less than good, we have a problem. What makes the inequity even starker is that many of these schools are concentrated in particular parts of the country, serving the same demographic groups – often the white working class. I make no apology for not giving these schools an easier judgement; I’d never want us to be saying that this education wouldn’t do for Chelsea children, but it’s good enough for Grimsby. The moment we allow for a different quality of education based on demographics is the moment we concede defeat in the battle for equality of opportunity. It would be the moment we wrote off the Einsteins, Mozarts and Brontes of the future who don’t happen to grow up on the right side of the tracks. Instead, we need a real focus on improving standards in areas and schools that lag behind. We need to inject capacity. In the FE sector, there is potential for a dilution in the quality of apprenticeships. There are common issues around poor governance, low-quality teaching and not enough off-the-job training. Ofsted is also concerned about access to apprenticeships for students who leave school without a full level 2 qualification. Launching her second Annual Report as Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman said today that, thanks to the hard work of teachers, lecturers, childminders, social workers and many others, the quality of education and care in England is good and improving: Instead, to put all children on the path to success, the most important thing is to get the basics right, which begins with early literacy. But the Annual Report finds that getting the basics right for one group of children is not always translating to getting it right for another.The phonics screening check has had a major impact on the standard of early reading, with year-on-year increases in the proportion of children reaching the expected standard on the check. However, the percentage of children on free school meals (FSM) who reach the expected standard on the check is 12 percentage points lower than their more affluent peers. There should be no reason for this, because the check is one of reading mechanics. Schools that focus on early reading make a major difference. Others need to do more. To support them, Ofsted will propose changes in the new education inspection framework that strengthen the focus on early reading.There is also stark regional variation here, but not the usual pattern of advantage versus disadvantage. Areas such as Newham and Newcastle, which educate high proportions of disadvantaged children, excel in making sure that pupils eligible for FSM perform well on the phonics check. At the same time, more affluent areas like West Berkshire lag behind.The Annual Report also highlights concerns raised by Ofsted’s local area SEND inspections. These have shown that provision for young people with special educational needs and/or disabilities (SEND) is too disjointed and inconsistent. Diagnoses are taking too long and are often inaccurate. Mental health needs are not supported sufficiently. The quality of education, health and care (EHC) plans is far too variable. Critically, the gap in performance and outcomes for children with SEND is widening between the best and worst local areas. Crucial to delivering a good service is having the right resources, a qualified workforce and strong leadership in order to be good or better. However, the Annual Report finds that in too many cases, the capacity for improvement does not exist.There are almost 500 ‘stuck’ schools across England that have been judged inadequate or requires improvement at every inspection since 2005. This means that some children may have been in a failing school for their entire time at secondary school. More outstanding schools and school leaders are needed to help these schools improve.Across the country, turnaround rates for underperforming schools remain too slow. A lack of sponsor capacity means some schools have been left in limbo for over 18 months before joining a multi-academy trust (MAT). The Annual Report argues that the current halfway-house approach to academisation is not working and calls for incentives to be reinstated to encourage the best schools to become academies and to use their expertise to sponsor.Ms Spielman continued: Speaking to an audience of education and social care professionals, local authority representatives and policy experts in Westminster, Ms Spielman said that there has been real progress, but there is still much more to do: In children’s social care, funding for statutory services has largely been protected locally. However, reductions in funding for other areas, such as youth services, mean demand has been pushed downstream because LAs are less able to intervene early when young people need help. The Annual Report provides a summary of Ofsted’s findings from inspections, visits and research over the past year. It presents a ‘state of the nation’ commentary on the quality of education, training and care services in England.This year’s report is clear that, across the sectors Ofsted inspects, people are working incredibly hard to deliver for young people. However, the Chief Inspector said today that underneath the headline success, deep inequities remain.Ms Spielman continued: teacher workload and well-being managing the most challenging behaviour in schools how faith schools successfully navigate potential conflicts between their religious beliefs and equality legislation physical development in the early years curriculum the 16 to 19 curriculum curriculum knowledge and pedagogy in initial teacher education factors leading to good decisions for children in care creating the environments for great social work practice to thrive Between 2016 and 2017, 19,000 pupils dropped off school rolls between Years 10 and 11 and around half did not reappear on the roll of another state-funded school. This is a huge cause for concern. Ofsted’s new education inspection framework will empower schools to always put the child first, and it will allow inspectors to report on those schools that off-roll young people who might achieve less well. This paints a positive picture for much of the country. However, the Ofsted Annual Report finds that some young people still have the deck stacked against them. It calls for policy makers and practitioners to redouble their efforts to tackle these challenges and drive up standards in the years ahead. The Chief Inspector urged policy makers to avoid searching for the latest gimmicks from the tech world to tackle these problems, saying: 95% of early years providers are judged good or outstanding 76% of further education (FE) colleges and 86% of schools are at least good 82% of children’s homes are good or better the number of local authorities (LAs) judged good or outstanding for children’s services continues to risecenter_img There are still children who lag behind. Children, for whom it seems the die is cast, even before entering nursery, and who never catch up in 12 years of schooling. Wealth remains a predictor, albeit a weaker one, of educational performance. And despite promises from policy makers, FE is too often seen as a poor relation to schools, somewhere for ‘other people’s children’, while the outlook for too many children in contact with the care system remains bleak. New problems have emerged as well. A child in Hackney is more likely to fulfil their potential than ever before, but in some of our coastal towns and white working class communities, attainment, progress and aspiration are too low. Sink schools may have disappeared, but some schools that haven’t improved for more than a decade remain. Our colleges look less financially secure than in the past. Across the whole education sector a mentality of ‘what’s measured is what gets done’ trumps the true purpose of education, and curriculum thinking–the consideration of what needs to be taught and learned for a full education–has been eroded. The counterpart in social care is that while statutory services have largely been protected from funding cuts, early help and prevention have indeed been cut back. And schools have become another front in the new culture wars, expected to tackle an ever growing list of societal issues. Some policy makers and practitioners are constantly looking for the next magic potion that will infallibly raise standards or reduce the numbers of children in care. Indeed, despite the history of snake oil, white elephants and fashionable gimmicks that have in the main been debunked, there remains a curious optimism that the elixir of education is just around the corner. But the truth is, we don’t need an elixir to help raise standards, because we already have the tried and tested ingredients we need. Other areas of concern highlighted in the Annual Report In some early years settings, children’s physical development is being hindered by undue concerns about health and safety requirements; some level of risk is essential in childhood. Without it, children are denied opportunities to build muscular strength and dexterity. There is a group of young people who seem to have the deck stacked against them. I often liken the path through education to a slope. For affluent and high ability children the slope is, in general, fairly shallow, and the path to reaching their potential only moderately challenging. For others from poorer backgrounds, who face challenges in the home, or who struggle with learning, the gradient is steeper and the path is harder. Our job as education and care professionals is to reduce that gradient, to make that path shallower. And perhaps the most important thing we can do to reduce that gradient is to get the basics right. Spending per student in an FE or sixth form college is now 11% lower than for pupils at secondary school. Ofsted is concerned about the college sector’s financial sustainability and the impact that funding cuts can have on provision. Read the Ofsted Annual Report. SEND in mainstream schools In January, Ofsted will consult on the new education inspection framework and handbooks. This will give the sector a real opportunity to shape the future of inspection. The framework is being piloted throughout the autumn term until July 2019, with information and training sessions for schools running in parallel. Subject to the consultation, the new framework will take effect from September 2019.Research programmeOver the next year, Ofsted’s research programme will explore many of the themes discussed in the Annual Report. This will include projects looking at: In addition, Ofsted will be working with the Department for Education to look at ‘stuck schools’ and what they can do to improve.last_img read more

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Vermont unemployment rate rises half-point to 6.9 percent

first_imgThe Vermont Unemployment rate rose a half-point in December to a seasonally adjusted 6.9 percent, according to figures released today by the US Department of Labor. This is the highest rate since last spring, when the rate peaked at 7.4 percent last May. The December 2009 rate is exactly one-point higher than the December 2008 rate of 5.9 percent.“All our labor market indicators were down in December, resulting in a fairly large increase in Vermont’s unemployment rate” said Patricia Moulton Powden, Commissioner of the Vermont Department of Labor. “For example, there were a number of previously announced layoff events that took affect in late November and early December. December typically has the highest number of payroll jobs of any month. While we saw an unadjusted increase in jobs this month, it was below typical levels. Since job levels and unemployment rates have been stable for several months now, we will have to wait and see if December was an anomaly.”Seasonal Job GrowthTypically we expect an increase averaging 4,200 jobs in December. Before seasonal adjustment, Total Non-Farm (TNF) jobs grew by only 2,100 or 0.7% over the month. The annual rate unadjusted job growth improved to -1.9% though this will be revised as we complete our annual benchmarking process. This rate of annual loss is much better than what we have seen in the last few months, but this is due to an overstated job loss estimate in December of 2008 rather than any recent change in the job market. Most of the seasonal gains came from Leisure & Hospitality, (5,000 jobs or 18.4%). The largest seasonal declines were observed in Construction, (-1,500 or -11.7%) Manufacturing, (-1,000 or -3.3%) and Professional & Business Services, (-700 or -3.3%). Surprisingly, Retail Trade showed no seasonal growth over November, (-50 jobs or -0.1%).When seasonally adjusted, December payroll jobs fell by 2,400 or -0.8% from November. Only Leisure & Hospitality showed any significant seasonally adjusted growth, (1,100 or 3.6%). Manufacturing (-1,000 or -3.3%) Retail Trade, (-600 or -1.6%) Construction, (-500 or -4.0%) and Professional & Business Services, (-400 or -1.9%) all showed significant job losses.Employment GrowthVermont’s December seasonally adjusted unemployment rate increased by five tenths of a point to 6.9% percent as a result of declining employment and a modest increase in the number of unemployed. Vermont’s labor force fell back closer to the levels seen prior to November. Vermont’s December seasonally adjusted employment, unemployment levels and unemployment rate were statistically different from November levels. For comparison purposes, the US seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for December was 10.0 percent, unchanged from the November rate.December unemployment rates for Vermont’s 17 labor market areas ranged from 4.0 percent in Hartford to 9.2 percent in Newport. Local labor market area unemployment rates are not seasonally adjusted. For comparison, the December unadjusted unemployment rate for Vermont was 6.6 percent, up four-tenths of a point from November 2009 and up 0.7 points from a year ago. The December unadjusted estimates were not statistically different from November values.The planned implementation of the final phase of methodology changes in the Current Employment Statistics (CES) program has been delayed until the January 2010 estimates (published in March). These new procedures are designed to bring state job estimates more in line with national estimates. The initial change in methodology resulted in a sharp shift downward in November and December, 2008 job estimates which now appear to have overestimated job loss. As a result, year over year comparisons for November and December are not valid until we have completed the annual benchmark process. The benchmark process will be complete by January 2010. As we move forward we can expect small sample states like Vermont to exhibit a higher degree of variability in month to month job estimates. As a result of this change in methodology, caution should be used in interpreting single month’s results. CES payroll job numbers are now best understood in the context of their movement over several months as opposed to observed changes in a single month estimates. For details of these changes, please contact Andy Condon at the Vermont Department of Labor at 802-828-4153 or [email protected](link sends e-mail).Regional and state unemployment rates were generally higher in December. Forty-three states and the District of Columbia recorded over-the-month unemployment rate increases, four states registered rate decreases, and three states had no rate change, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Over the year, jobless rates increased in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The national unemployment rate was unchanged in December at 10.0 percent but was 2.6 percentage points higher than a year earlier.In December, nonfarm payroll employment increased in 11 states and the District of Columbia and decreased in 39 states. The largest over- the-month increase in employment occurred in Virginia (9,500), followed by Oklahoma (5,000), Oregon (2,900), New Hampshire and Wash ington (2,000 each). New Hampshire, Oklahoma, and Virginia experi enced the largest over-the-month percentage increase in employment (0.3 percent each), followed by the District of Columbia, Hawaii, and Oregon (0.2 percent each). The largest over-the-month decrease in employment occurred in California (-38,800), followed by Texas (-23,900), Ohio (-16,700), Illinois (-16,300), Michigan (-15,700), Wisconsin (-15,200), and Georgia (-15,100). Montana (-1.5 percent) experienced the largest over-the-month percentage decrease in employment, followed by Nevada (-1.0 percent), Iowa and South Dakota (-0.9 percent each), and Vermont (-0.8 percent). Over the year, non- farm employment decreased in all 50 states but increased in the District of Columbia. The largest over-the-year percentage decreases occurred in Wyoming (-6.8 percent), Nevada (-6.6 percent), Michigan (-5.1 percent), and Arizona (-4.8 percent).Regional Unemployment (Seasonally Adjusted)The West had the highest regional jobless rate in December, 10.7 per- cent. The Northeast recorded the lowest rate, 9.2 percent. The North- east had a statistically significant rate increase over the month (0.5 percentage point). The South had the only other significant re- gional rate change (0.3 percentage point). Over the year, all four regions registered significant rate increases, the largest of which was in the West (3.3 percentage points). (See table 1.)Among the nine geographic divisions, the Pacific continued to report the highest jobless rate, 11.7 percent in December. The East North Central recorded the next highest rate, 11.3 percent. The West North Central registered the lowest December jobless rate, 7.3 percent, followed by the West South Central, 8.0 percent. The South Atlantic rate (10.3 percent) set a new series high. (All region, division, and state series begin in 1976.) Five divisions experienced statistically significant unemployment rate increases from a month earlier, the largest of which were in East South Central and New England (0.5 percentage point each). No division had a rate decrease. All nine divisions reported significant over-the-year rate increases of at least 1.8 percentage points. The largest of these occurred in the East South Central (3.8 percentage points) and East North Central (3.7 points).State Unemployment (Seasonally Adjusted)Michigan again recorded the highest unemployment rate among the states, 14.6 percent in December. The states with the next highest rates were Nevada, 13.0 percent; Rhode Island, 12.9 percent; and South Carolina, 12.6 percent. North Dakota continued to register the lowest jobless rate, 4.4 percent in December, followed by Nebraska and South Dakota, 4.7 percent each. The rate in South Carolina set a new series high, as did the rates in three other states: Delaware (9.0 percent), Florida (11.8 percent), and North Carolina (11.2 percent). The rate in the District of Columbia also set a new series high (12.1 percent). In total, 27 states posted jobless rates significantly lower than the U.S. figure of 10.0 percent, 10 states and the District of Columbia had measurably higher rates, and 13 states had rates that were not ap- preciably different from that of the nation. (See tables A and 3.)Twenty-one states reported statistically significant over-the-month unemployment rate increases in December. Louisiana and Mississippi experienced the largest of these (0.8 percentage point each). One state, South Dakota, saw a statistically significant rate decrease from November (-0.2 percentage point). The remaining 28 states and the District of Columbia registered jobless rates that were not appreciably different from those of a month earlier, though some had changes that were at least as large numerically as the significant changes. (See table B.)All states and the District of Columbia recorded statistically significant increases in their jobless rates from December 2008. The largest of these increases were in Nevada and West Virginia (4.6 percentage points each), closely followed by Alabama (4.5 points) and Michigan (4.4 points). The smallest rate increases occurred in Minnesota and Nebraska (0.8 percentage point each). (See table C.)Nonfarm Payroll Employment (Seasonally Adjusted)In December, 13 states experienced statistically significant over-the- month changes in employment, all of which were decreases. The largest statistically significant job losses occurred in California (-38,800), Ohio (-16,700), and Illinois (-16,300). The smallest statistically significant decreases in employment occurred in Vermont (-2,400), South Dakota (-3,600), and Montana (-6,400). (See tables D and 5.)Over the year, 44 states experienced statistically significant changes in employment, all of which were decreases. The largest statistically significant job losses occurred in California (-579,400), Texas (-276,000), Illinois (-237,300), Florida (-232,400), and Michigan (-207,100). The smallest statistically significant decreases in employ- ment occurred in South Dakota (-10,900), Delaware (-12,100), and Montana (-13,700). (See table E.)____________ The Metropolitan Area Employment and Unemployment news release for December 2009 is scheduled to be released on Tuesday, February 2, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. (EST). The Regional and State Unemployment 2009 Annual Averages news release is scheduled to be released on Friday, February 26, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. (EST). The Regional and State Employment and Unemployment news release for January is scheduled to be released on Wednesday, March 10, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. (EST).Table A. States with unemployment rates significantly differ-ent from that of the U.S., December 2009, seasonally adjusted————————————————————– State | Rate(p)————————————————————–United States (1) ……………….| 10.0 |Alaska …………………………| 8.8Arkansas ……………………….| 7.7California ……………………..| 12.4Colorado ……………………….| 7.5Connecticut …………………….| 8.9Delaware ……………………….| 9.0District of Columbia …………….| 12.1Florida ………………………..| 11.8Hawaii …………………………| 6.9Illinois ……………………….| 11.1 |Iowa …………………………..| 6.6Kansas …………………………| 6.6Louisiana ………………………| 7.5Maine ………………………….| 8.3Maryland ……………………….| 7.5Michigan ……………………….| 14.6Minnesota ………………………| 7.4Montana ………………………..| 6.7Nebraska ……………………….| 4.7Nevada …………………………| 13.0 |New Hampshire …………………..| 7.0New Mexico ……………………..| 8.3New York ……………………….| 9.0North Carolina ………………….| 11.2North Dakota ……………………| 4.4Ohio …………………………..| 10.9Oklahoma ……………………….| 6.6Oregon …………………………| 11.0Pennsylvania ……………………| 8.9Rhode Island ……………………| 12.9 |South Carolina ………………….| 12.6South Dakota ……………………| 4.7Texas ………………………….| 8.3Utah …………………………..| 6.7Vermont ………………………..| 6.9Virginia ……………………….| 6.9Wisconsin ………………………| 8.7Wyoming ………………………..| 7.5————————————————————– 1 Data are not preliminary. p = preliminary.Table B. States with statistically significant unemployment rate changesfrom November 2009 to December 2009, seasonally adjusted————————————————————————- | Rate | |———–|———–| Over-the-month State | November | December | rate change(p) | 2009 | 2009(p) |————————————————————————-Colorado …………………..| 6.9 | 7.5 | 0.6Connecticut ………………..| 8.2 | 8.9 | .7Delaware …………………..| 8.6 | 9.0 | .4Florida ……………………| 11.5 | 11.8 | .3Louisiana ………………….| 6.7 | 7.5 | .8Massachusetts ………………| 8.7 | 9.4 | .7Mississippi ………………..| 9.8 | 10.6 | .8Montana ……………………| 6.4 | 6.7 | .3New Mexico …………………| 7.8 | 8.3 | .5New York …………………..| 8.6 | 9.0 | .4 | | |North Carolina ……………..| 10.7 | 11.2 | .5North Dakota ……………….| 4.1 | 4.4 | .3Pennsylvania ……………….| 8.5 | 8.9 | .4South Dakota ……………….| 4.8 | 4.7 | -.2Tennessee ………………….| 10.2 | 10.9 | .7Texas ……………………..| 8.0 | 8.3 | .3Utah ………………………| 6.3 | 6.7 | .4Vermont ……………………| 6.4 | 6.9 | .5Virginia …………………..| 6.6 | 6.9 | .3Washington …………………| 9.0 | 9.5 | .5West Virginia ………………| 8.4 | 9.1 | .7Wisconsin ………………….| 8.2 | 8.7 | .5————————————————————————- p = preliminary.Table C. States with statistically significant unemployment rate changesfrom December 2008 to December 2009, seasonally adjusted————————————————————————- | Rate | |———–|———–| Over-the-year State | December | December | rate change(p) | 2008 | 2009(p) |————————————————————————-Alabama ……………………| 6.5 | 11.0 | 4.5Alaska …………………….| 6.8 | 8.8 | 2.0Arizona ……………………| 6.6 | 9.1 | 2.5Arkansas …………………..| 5.7 | 7.7 | 2.0California …………………| 8.7 | 12.4 | 3.7Colorado …………………..| 5.8 | 7.5 | 1.7Connecticut ………………..| 6.6 | 8.9 | 2.3Delaware …………………..| 5.7 | 9.0 | 3.3District of Columbia ………..| 8.2 | 12.1 | 3.9Florida ……………………| 7.6 | 11.8 | 4.2 | | |Georgia ……………………| 7.5 | 10.3 | 2.8Hawaii …………………….| 5.1 | 6.9 | 1.8Idaho ……………………..| 6.1 | 9.1 | 3.0Illinois …………………..| 7.2 | 11.1 | 3.9Indiana ……………………| 7.8 | 9.9 | 2.1Iowa ………………………| 4.4 | 6.6 | 2.2Kansas …………………….| 5.0 | 6.6 | 1.6Kentucky …………………..| 7.6 | 10.7 | 3.1Louisiana ………………….| 5.5 | 7.5 | 2.0Maine ……………………..| 6.5 | 8.3 | 1.8 | | |Maryland …………………..| 5.4 | 7.5 | 2.1Massachusetts ………………| 6.4 | 9.4 | 3.0Michigan …………………..| 10.2 | 14.6 | 4.4Minnesota ………………….| 6.6 | 7.4 | .8Mississippi ………………..| 7.8 | 10.6 | 2.8Missouri …………………..| 7.1 | 9.6 | 2.5Montana ……………………| 5.0 | 6.7 | 1.7Nebraska …………………..| 3.9 | 4.7 | .8Nevada …………………….| 8.4 | 13.0 | 4.6New Hampshire ………………| 4.3 | 7.0 | 2.7 | | |New Jersey …………………| 6.8 | 10.1 | 3.3New Mexico …………………| 4.7 | 8.3 | 3.6New York …………………..| 6.6 | 9.0 | 2.4North Carolina ……………..| 8.1 | 11.2 | 3.1North Dakota ……………….| 3.3 | 4.4 | 1.1Ohio ………………………| 7.4 | 10.9 | 3.5Oklahoma …………………..| 4.6 | 6.6 | 2.0Oregon …………………….| 8.3 | 11.0 | 2.7Pennsylvania ……………….| 6.4 | 8.9 | 2.5Rhode Island ……………….| 9.4 | 12.9 | 3.5 | | |South Carolina ……………..| 8.8 | 12.6 | 3.8South Dakota ……………….| 3.7 | 4.7 | 1.0Tennessee ………………….| 7.6 | 10.9 | 3.3Texas ……………………..| 5.6 | 8.3 | 2.7Utah ………………………| 4.1 | 6.7 | 2.6Vermont ……………………| 5.9 | 6.9 | 1.0Virginia …………………..| 5.0 | 6.9 | 1.9Washington …………………| 6.5 | 9.5 | 3.0West Virginia ………………| 4.5 | 9.1 | 4.6Wisconsin ………………….| 5.9 | 8.7 | 2.8Wyoming ……………………| 3.2 | 7.5 | 4.3————————————————————————- p = preliminary.Table D. States with statistically significant employment changes fromNovember 2009 to December 2009, seasonally adjusted————————————————————————– | November | December | Over-the-month State | 2009 | 2009(p) | change(p)————————————————————————–Alabama…………………..| 1,898,900 | 1,888,500 | -10,400California………………..| 14,186,800 | 14,148,000 | -38,800Georgia…………………..| 3,854,800 | 3,839,700 | -15,100Illinois………………….| 5,628,500 | 5,612,200 | -16,300Iowa……………………..| 1,482,000 | 1,468,800 | -13,200Michigan………………….| 3,846,700 | 3,831,000 | -15,700Montana…………………..| 437,400 | 431,000 | -6,400Nevada……………………| 1,166,200 | 1,154,600 | -11,600Ohio……………………..| 5,103,600 | 5,086,900 | -16,700South Dakota………………| 404,100 | 400,500 | -3,600 | | |Tennessee…………………| 2,646,600 | 2,636,700 | -9,900Vermont…………………..| 294,600 | 292,200 | -2,400Wisconsin…………………| 2,727,500 | 2,712,300 | -15,200————————————————————————– p = preliminary.Table E. States with statistically significant employment changes fromDecember 2008 to December 2009, seasonally adjusted————————————————————————– | December | December | Over-the-year State | 2008 | 2009(p) | change(p)————————————————————————–Alabama…………………..| 1,953,500 | 1,888,500 | -65,000Arizona…………………..| 2,534,100 | 2,412,000 | -122,100California………………..| 14,727,400 | 14,148,000 | -579,400Colorado………………….| 2,320,600 | 2,234,000 | -86,600Connecticut……………….| 1,673,900 | 1,614,900 | -59,000Delaware………………….| 421,900 | 409,800 | -12,100Florida…………………..| 7,576,100 | 7,343,700 | -232,400Georgia…………………..| 4,013,600 | 3,839,700 | -173,900Hawaii……………………| 609,400 | 586,100 | -23,300Illinois………………….| 5,849,500 | 5,612,200 | -237,300 | | |Indiana…………………..| 2,899,400 | 2,796,300 | -103,100Iowa……………………..| 1,508,900 | 1,468,800 | -40,100Kansas……………………| 1,389,600 | 1,329,900 | -59,700Kentucky………………….| 1,823,800 | 1,764,500 | -59,300Louisiana…………………| 1,948,600 | 1,901,700 | -46,900Maine…………………….| 604,800 | 588,800 | -16,000Maryland………………….| 2,568,400 | 2,524,000 | -44,400Massachusetts……………..| 3,230,200 | 3,164,000 | -66,200Michigan………………….| 4,038,100 | 3,831,000 | -207,100Minnesota…………………| 2,722,300 | 2,642,400 | -79,900 | | |Mississippi……………….| 1,127,200 | 1,101,400 | -25,800Missouri………………….| 2,770,900 | 2,708,300 | -62,600Montana…………………..| 444,700 | 431,000 | -13,700Nebraska………………….| 963,700 | 938,300 | -25,400Nevada……………………| 1,235,600 | 1,154,600 | -81,000New Jersey………………..| 4,000,500 | 3,910,400 | -90,100New Mexico………………..| 843,100 | 817,100 | -26,000New York………………….| 8,713,500 | 8,544,900 | -168,600North Carolina…………….| 4,048,200 | 3,924,000 | -124,200Ohio……………………..| 5,271,800 | 5,086,900 | -184,900 | | |Oklahoma………………….| 1,595,600 | 1,558,900 | -36,700Oregon……………………| 1,689,600 | 1,617,200 | -72,400Pennsylvania………………| 5,749,200 | 5,598,900 | -150,300Rhode Island………………| 471,200 | 453,800 | -17,400South Carolina…………….| 1,884,100 | 1,846,400 | -37,700South Dakota………………| 411,400 | 400,500 | -10,900Tennessee…………………| 2,726,100 | 2,636,700 | -89,400Texas…………………….| 10,631,300 | 10,355,300 | -276,000Utah……………………..| 1,246,700 | 1,200,100 | -46,600Virginia………………….| 3,711,200 | 3,656,500 | -54,700 | | |Washington………………..| 2,923,700 | 2,834,900 | -88,800West Virginia……………..| 757,400 | 738,500 | -18,900Wisconsin…………………| 2,832,800 | 2,712,300 | -120,500Wyoming…………………..| 303,100 | 282,400 | -20,700————————————————————————– p = preliminary.last_img read more

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Jamaica Combats Human Trafficking

first_img The Government of Jamaica spent approximately $15 million during the 2010 and 2011 fiscal years to support victims and pass more legislation to combat trafficking in people. The U.S. Department of State’s 2011 Trafficking in Persons Report notes that the country is a source, transit point, and destination for adults and children subjected to sex trafficking and forced labor. The document highlights the progress made in the protection of trafficking victims during the reporting period. The minister of state in the Jamaica Ministry of National Security, St. Aubyn Bartlett, said that while the main piece of legislation already in effect is the Trafficking in Persons Act of 2007, the government continues to provide subsidiary laws. Despite limited resources, free legal, medical and psychological services are offered to victims of human trafficking. Sources: Jamaica Observer, South Florida Caribbean News By Dialogo January 01, 2012last_img read more

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Peru’s Strong Presence in Peacekeeping Missions

first_imgBy Marcos Ommati/Diálogo November 09, 2017 Peru’s participation in United Nations (UN) peacekeeping missions is decades old—the nation is a founding member of the UN. In fact, in 1988, under the leadership of former UN Secretary-General Javier Pérez de Cuéllar, who was Peruvian, UN Peacekeeping Forces received the Nobel Peace Prize. Peru’s participation in UN missions goes back to 1958, when the nation sent troops to Lebanon. Since then, members of the Peruvian Army, Navy, and Air Force have participated in peacekeeping missions in countries like Israel, Namibia, Ivory Coast, Cyprus, and Haiti.Diálogo spoke with Brigadier General Fernando Hernán Fitzcarrald Guerrero, head of the International Affairs Office of the Peruvian Armed Forces Joint Command[NG1] , about Peruvian military participation in peacekeeping missions around the world and the role of the Peru Engineer Company in the Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA), among other issues.Diálogo: How did Peru’s participation in UN peacekeeping missions start and consolidate?Brigadier General Fernando Hernán Fitzcarrald Guerrero, head of the International Affairs Office of the Peruvian Armed Forces Joint Command: Our nation has always been sensitive to the efforts of the United Nations to help achieve and reinforce the noble goals of peace and peaceful coexistence—a fundamental  condition for economic and social development for people around the world. The Peruvian Armed Forces’ current participation in UN peacekeeping missions falls under the Memorandum of Understanding signed between the United Nations and the Peruvian government on November 11th, 2003.Diálogo: What is the purpose of Peru’s participation in peacekeeping missions?Brig. Gen. Fitzcarrald: We seek to have a greater participation of the Peruvian Armed Forces in UN peace operations and fulfill the international commitments of our government related to world peace and respect for human rights. Another objective is to implement mechanisms to promote and increase female service members’ participation in peacekeeping missions as general staff officers and military observers. Another important aspect is to promote Peru’s image internationally, allowing us to share our culture, cuisine, and folklore, among other things, with the military and civilian personnel from other countries in peacekeeping missions.Diálogo: How many Peruvian service members are participating in peacekeeping missions?Brig. Gen. Fitzcarrald: In November 2004, the first Peruvian contingent traveled to Haiti. It included 205 personnel from the three military branches and was initially set up in the city of Jacmel. During the Peru Company’s participation, more than 20 contingents have been sent to Haiti—a total of 6,125 male and 114 female service members. We have an engineering company with 205 personnel deployed in MINUSCA, and we also have officers in military observer positions and members of the General Staff in missions in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Central African Republic, South Sudan, Darfur, and Abyei. We are also completing the process for a 250-person infantry company to deploy in peacekeeping missions. That company is already registered among the national commitments made with the United Nations.Diálogo: What has been Peru’s contribution to peacekeeping missions?Brig. Gen. Fitzcarrald: Peru’s contribution to peacekeeping missions has been with personnel and material used not only to guarantee people’s protection, but also to aid with the transition process, to facilitate humanitarian assistance, to promote and defend human rights, and to support demobilization and reintegration. Our Armed Forces have done an outstanding job completing the various peacekeeping missions that we participate in.Diálogo: The Peru Engineer Company is a contingent that was recently deployed to MINUSCA. Could you talk about that?Brig. Gen. Fitzcarrald: Following their arrival on January 7th, 2016, the 205 military members who make up the Peru Engineer Company deployed and installed their equipment as part of MINUSCA. The Peru Engineer Company comprises 145 members from the Army, 41 from the Navy, and 19 from the Air Force. They perform construction and maintenance duties for airports, highways, and bridges in the country as part of the work assigned by the UN, and they are relieved annually for a 10-year period under agreements with the United Nations. It’s worth noting that on January 6th, 2016, the Peru Engineer Company deployed to Bangui, the capital of the Central African Republic, where they completed their induction process and administrative procedures. Later, they moved to the city of Bouar, where they focused on the work assigned by the United Nations. Our nation’s participation in MINUSCA was completed within the framework of a Memorandum of Understanding between the Peruvian government and the United Nations, through which our country demonstrated its commitment to contribute to the international organization’s peacekeeping missions.Diálogo: Can you provide details about the duties of the Peruvian contingent in support of the Central African Republic?Brig. Gen. Fitzcarrald: The engineer company performs maintenance and construction duties on unpaved runways as well as heliport repair, in addition to other roadwork, highway, and bridge maintenance work the UN assigns to contribute to peace and development in the Central African Republic. Among the complementary duties that Peruvian service members perform in Africa are land clearing—including [soil] compaction and leveling needed to build an aerodrome—restoring, building, and maintaining unpaved runways; repairing, building, and maintaining heliports; and transporting construction materials.Diálogo: What progress has the 2016 contingent made on the aerodromes in the Central African Republic?Brig. Gen. Fitzcarrald: Initially, the mission of the Peru Engineer Company deployed in the Central African Republic was to build and maintain 35 airfields. However, over the course of the deployment, they were assigned other duties. This year, we’ve been responsible for building two aerodromes, and building and maintaining 490 kilometers of highway in different areas that the mission is responsible for. From an engineering standpoint, the work requires a large amount of human resources and materials in a harsh geographical environment with high temperatures and the presence of armed groups, among other issues.Diálogo: Can you give us some examples of some of the main challenges that the Peruvian contingent faced in the construction of aerodromes and highways and how were they overcome?Brig. Gen. Fitzcarrald: The main challenges for the Peru Engineer Company are the instability—the lack of public safety in the mission area due to the presence of hostile armed groups—the rugged geography, and the various endemic diseases, particularly malaria, which affected our personnel. We’ve kept the risks to a minimum with the use of, adequate prophylaxis and preventive treatments.Diálogo: What are the results of the Security Council’s assessment of MINUSCA and other missions?Brig. Gen. Fitzcarrald: During its two-year mission in the Central African Republic, the Peruvian contingent has effectively and efficiently carried out its duties. As such, in coordination with the Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO), there are plans to deploy more military personnel in the MINUSCA mission to increase the good work of our unit.Diálogo: How does the Peruvian Armed Forces’ experience contribute to the fight against terrorism and cooperation with partner nations’ forces in peacekeeping missions?Brig. Gen. Fitzcarrald: The combat experience of our Armed Forces in their ongoing fight against terrorism has provided us the professional experience to do a good job in the peace missions, where the presence of our nation has been requested, creating a precedent in the United Nations, which is why DPKO plans to deploy a force similar to the one that existed in Haiti up to 2015.Diálogo: Would you like to add anything else for Diálogo’s readers?Brig. Gen. Fitzcarrald: The Joint Command, in coordination with the Peruvian Navy, initiated the process to make the participation of these units feasible:A mechanized Marine Corps company.A logistics resupply ship with a helicopter onboard.A guided missile frigate with a helicopter onboard.This process takes time due to budgetary, logistic, organizational, and equipment planning, and to adapt to UN and other regulations. That’s why the participation of these units won’t be official until 2018.last_img read more

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571st MSAS Provides Key C-130 Training to Colombian Air Force

first_imgBy U.S. Air Force’s 621st Contingency Response Wing Public Affairs April 22, 2020 U.S. Air Force airmen from the 571st Mobility Support Advisory Squadron (MSAS) worked with the Colombian Armed Forces as part of a mobile training team from February 11 through March 11 at two air bases in Colombia.The team was comprised of 15 air advisors from the 571st MSAS at Travis Air Force Base, California, and six total force instructors from three other U.S. Air Force units. The training covered a variety of areas of cooperation between the U.S. and Colombia.It aimed at supporting Colombia in their pursuit to counter transnational and transregional threat networks and to enhance the capability of the Colombian Air Force (FAC, in Spanish) to maintain regional security through increased proficiency in mobility support operations.The training was conducted at the Military Air Transport Command in Bogotá, and the 1st Combat Air Command in Palanquero, both in Colombia. The training topics focused on C-130 aircraft maintenance, aerial firefighting procedures, search and rescue, intelligence, and medical intelligence.U.S. Air Force Technical Sergeant Jacob Haines shows Colombian Air Force maintainers proper maintenance techniques and electrical system familiarization and troubleshooting during a mobile training team mission, March 5, 2020, in Colombia. (Photo: U.S. Air Force’s 621st Contingency Response Wing Public Affairs)The C-130s, located at the Military Air Transport Command, are the workhorse of the FAC fleet, capable of conducting a diverse mission set. Throughout the engagement, 571st MSAS maintenance air advisors worked with the FAC to develop their maintenance philosophy, systems knowledge, and best practices and procedures. A heavy focus was placed on the C-130 engine, hydraulic, fuel, environmental and electrical system familiarization, and troubleshooting.Instructors conducted training through classroom briefings and hands-on training on the aircraft, to gain a thorough understanding of Colombian maintenance practices.“The students were very engaged in the training we provided,” said U.S. Air Force Technical Sergeant Jacob Haines, 571st MSAS advisor. “I am confident that our students’ capacity to properly maintain their C-130 fleet has increased.”Additionally, the 571st MSAS team provided ground training to the Colombian air force on Modular Airborne Fire Fighting Systems, or MAFFS, a system loaded into the back of a C-130 aircraft that drops fire retardant to aid in stopping the spread of wildfires.Employing an aerial firefighting capability will help the FAC in combatting wildfires, both internally and internationally. The specialized training, provided by the U.S. Air Force Reserve Command personnel, was a stepping stone to future work with the FAC on further enhancing this capability.“While a very effective fire-fighting tool, this specific mission set requires consistent practice,” said U.S. Air Force Lieutenant Colonel Richard Pantusa, 731st Airlift Squadron MAFFS instructor pilot from Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado. “It is inherently a dangerous mission — flying low over mountainous terrain that is on fire. The FAC has a new MAFFS program that includes highly motivated and knowledgeable C-130 operators who are attempting to grow their MAFFS program.”The building partnership capacity missions the MSAS conducts, not only enhance the capabilities of the partner nation forces but also furthers the objectives of the U.S. in building strong international relationships. This mutual cooperation and support will assist both the U.S. and partner nations in crisis response operations by enabling the nations to coordinate together.last_img read more

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In Memoriam

first_imgIn Memoriam March 15, 2006 In Memoriam In Memoriam William Merle Barr, Daytona Beach Admitted 1963; Died December 20, 2005 Mary C. Breda, Ft. Lauderdale Admitted 1979; Died April 12, 2003 Jerry D. Bryant, Wilmington, OH Admitted 1984; Died December 27, 2005 Sylvan B. Burdick, West Palm Beach Admitted 1949; Died January 1, 2006 Ralph Peter Cafaro, Staten Island, NY Admitted 1993; Died September 8, 2003 Darrel Carnell, Ormond Beach Admitted 1951; Died December 16, 2005 Susan J. Cawthorne, Lady Lake Admitted 1989; Died December 5, 2005 Marshall M. Chern, Coral Gables Admitted 1949; Died July 4, 2005 H. Tucker Cotton, Montgomery, AL Admitted 1972; Died October 11, 2005 Manuel A. Crespo, Miami Admitted 1977; Died January 8, 2006 Ralph C. Dell, Tampa Admitted 1945; Died November 19, 2005 Garry Charles Faske, North Miami Admitted 1987; Died April 30, 2005 Daniel Philip Galfond, Coral Gables Admitted 2001; Died November 5, 2005 Robert Wade Glass, Clearwater Admitted 1991; Died December 26, 2005 Michael Graham, Phoenix, AZ Admitted 1978; Died July 17, 2004 Robert Treat Graham, Gonzalez Admitted 1976; Died May 5, 2005 Jack M. Green, Tallahassee Admitted 1940; Died January 19, 2006 Judy L. Groover, Jacksonville Admitted 1989; Died January 10, 2006 Edward Ronald Heath, Jr., Mechanic Falls, ME Admitted 1988; Died March 9, 2005 Robert I. Kasten, St. Petersburg Admitted 1972; Died June 23, 2004 Raymond L. Marky II, Tallahassee Admitted 1964; Died January 17, 2006 Ray Mattox, Winter Haven Admitted 1955; Died December 29, 2005 Richard E. McGee, Sr., Brooksville Admitted 1954; Died December 15, 2005 John E. McHugh, Jr., Van Nuys, CA Admitted 1977; December 27, 2004 Edward John Olsen, St. Petersburg Admitted 1979; Died June 25, 2002 George B. Oujevolk, Sebring Admitted 1935; Died July 23, 2000 John A. Paul, Jacksonville Admitted 1934; Died December 30, 2005 Ira Paull, Del Mar, CA Admitted 1980; Died September 28, 2003 Jose L. Pelleya, Miami Admitted 1974; Died May 27, 2005 G. Keith Quinney, Jr., Tallahassee Admitted 1976; Died January 2, 2006 James Michael Rampe, Ft. Lauderdale Admitted 1998; Died October 20, 2005 James T. Russell, St. Petersburg Admitted 1954; Died January 2, 2006 Christopher Paul Saxer, Ft. Walton Beach Admitted 1986; Died January 11, 2006 John Vincent Thornton, New York, NY Admitted 1996; Died June 15, 2005last_img read more

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OnSite: CUES Symposium CEO/Board Exchange

first_img 23SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Randall Smith Randall Smith is the co-founder of CUInsight.com, the host of The CUInsight Experience podcast, and a bit of a wanderlust.As one of the co-founders of CUInsight.com he … Web: www.CUInsight.com Details If you thought that the CUES Symposium at Grand Wailea here in Hawaii was all fun and games – think again! The past few days have been packed with learning and priceless moments that couldn’t happen anywhere else.The team from DDJ Myers has been hard at work engaging both credit union CEO’s and board members in discussions that can help them keep up with the changing pace of the industry. The balance of this relationship is crucial, yet tricky. It’s important to establish early on who will be responsible for setting the mission and strategy for the credit union in the coming years –only then can you successfully tackle issues that you both face; such as diversity, outdated technology, compensation, talent and mergers. Clarity of roles is a key component and cannot be stressed enough. CEO’s and board members ask yourself this question: “In 10 words or less what am I responsible for?” This gives you a starting point for open communication moving forward.Another point driven home here was the idea of creating “priceless surprises”. With help from MasterCard, attendees had the opportunity to meet golf pro, Tom Watson. Credit unions pride themselves on being member-centric and while you might not be able to arrange a meet and greet between a celebrity and your members what you can do is create a moment that they will always remember. Take a moment to consider what your members really care about and what influences their lives – then ask yourself how you help them achieve something they never thought possible. What I love most about this concept is that it’s scalable; creating a moment that a member cherishes will earn your credit union more loyalty and more “word of mouth” points than any promotional campaign could possibly achieve.In a fast paced world where being in the grind seems impossible to get out of, I challenge you to make time to be honest and transparent about your responsibilities, skills and limits. I also challenge you to get out of your comfort zone and really focus on your members as individuals and not a sub-group of the community you serve: what can you do for them that no one else can? Let’s make 2016 the year that members will never forget!last_img read more

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