INS Sindhurakshak to Leave Workshop on June 23th

first_img View post tag: Naval View post tag: 23th June 14, 2012 View post tag: Leave View post tag: INS View post tag: Navy View post tag: June View post tag: Sindhurakshak View post tag: News by topic Industry news Being repaired and modernized by JSC Zvezdochka shipyard, Indian diesel electric submarine INS Sindhurakshak will be withdrawn from covered slipway on June 23…(rusnavy)[mappress]Source: Russian Navy, June 14, 2012 Back to overview,Home naval-today INS Sindhurakshak to Leave Workshop on June 23th INS Sindhurakshak to Leave Workshop on June 23th View post tag: workshop Share this articlelast_img

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Eli Lilly, Yellow Jug Old Drugs collaboration creates funding opportunity for 100…

first_img A new grant from Eli Lilly and Companies will offer funding for 100 new prescription drug disposal sites at pharmacies in Indiana so that Hoosiers can safety turn in unused medications and deter abuse, said Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller.Eli Lilly and Companies recently gave a $30,000 grant to Yellow Jug Old Drugs, a program under the Great Lakes Clean Water/US Clean Water organization that provides prescription drug disposal services to pharmacies, so that members of the public can turn in unused medications for safe disposal and avert potential misuse.An estimated 46 Americans die each day from prescription drug overdose, and more than six million people suffer from prescription drug abuse disorders in the U.S. Three out of four heroin users say they started out abusing prescription drugs.Yellow Jug Old Drugs provides participating pharmacies with collection jugs and ongoing disposal services. Currently, 29 pharmacies in Indiana participate in Yellow Jug Old Drugs program. With the new grant, 100 new Indiana pharmacies will be able to participate at no cost for up to a year.According to Yellow Jug Old Drugs, this is the first time a pharmaceutical company in the U.S. has provided support for a drug disposal program. The Indiana Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Task Force helped facilitate this unique partnership.“This type of collaboration – among government, nonprofit, the medical community and now the pharmaceutical industry – is exactly what we need in the fight to reduce controlled substance abuse in Indiana,” said Zoeller, creator and co-chair of the Task Force. “Urging proper and frequent disposal of prescription medications is critical to getting old, unused drugs out of home medicine cabinets where they are ripe for abuse. We know that a majority of Rx abusers obtain the drugs from family members or friends, so getting people to dispose of these medications before they lead to abuse can have a major impact.”Zoeller thanked Eli Lilly for making a commitment to expanding Rx disposal options in Indiana and helping to reduce prescription drug abuse. Eli Lilly is a global health-care leader based in Indianapolis, Indiana.“The Yellow Jug Old Drugs program is a great example of how the public sector, nonprofit organizations and the private sector can work together to address challenging issues,” said Bill Reid, Senior Director of Global Public Policy and Anti-Counterfeiting Operations at Lilly. “Lilly is proud to partner with Great Lakes Clean Water, Attorney General Zoeller and participating pharmacies in this program.”Zoeller and his partners are urging any Indiana pharmacy that does not currently operate a drug disposal program to contact Yellow Jug Old Drugs and be among the pharmacies to utilize the new Lilly grant. Pharmacies interested in participating should call Yellow Jug Old Drugs at 989-736-8179 for more information.“The Yellow Jug Old Drugs program is currently funded primarily by participating pharmacies who like our approach and the nonprofit model that keeps costs low,” said Chris Angel, president of Great Lakes Clean Water/US Clean Water. “In the near future we believe that more support will come from the pharmaceutical industry as well from individuals who are concerned about water quality. We all know first-hand the benefits we derive from pharmaceuticals, and we should all play a part in supporting programs that provide proper disposal of Rx-Waste.”Eskenazi Health recently started the Yellow Jug Old Drugs program at 10 pharmacies in the greater Indianapolis area.“Eskenazi Health has been interested in developing an unwanted medications take-back program for our community due to concerns for both the environment and the prescription drug abuse epidemic,” said Jim Young, Quality Assurance/Regulatory Pharmacist at Eskenazi Health. “The Great Lakes Clean Water/US Clean Water group has developed a well-designed program to help us safely take-back unwanted medications and dispose of them appropriately.”Zoeller said encouraging safe disposal is one of the key goals of the Indiana Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Task Force. The Task Force’s Drug Take-Back Committee has helped encourage permanent Rx disposal locations in all but four of Indiana’s 92 counties.For a list of permanent disposal sites, click here. For more information on the Task Force and resources for the public, visit www.BitterPill.in.gov.Since 2008, the Yellow Jug Old Drugs Program has collected more than 108 tons of Rx-Waste. The Yellow Jug Old Drugs program is currently available in the Great Lakes region, but by January 2016 it will be available to all states that allow Rx collection by pharmacies.GLCW/USCW is the first nonprofit organization in the U.S. to be licensed as a Reverse Distributor by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA). Reverse Distributor designation is required to accept controlled substances from pharmacies for proper destruction. GLCW/USCW is one of 27 Reverse Distributors in the country.More information about Yellow Jug Old Drugs including a complete list of participating locations can be found at www.GreatLakesCleanWater.org or www.USCleanWater.org.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Small is beautiful

first_imgThe UK cakes market has enjoyed positive, though slowing, growth over the past five years, but the shape of the market is changing.In 2006, sales of small cakes, cake bars, pies and tarts were worth £670m, 62% of the total UK ambient cakes sector (Key Note Biscuits & Cakes report). By 2007, this had risen to £715m, or 65% of the total sector. Sales of large, whole cakes, pies and tarts, meanwhile, declined.Key Note says the trend is caused by the growing number of smaller households, more staggered eating times and the tendency to eat ’on the go’, rather than buy large cakes for sharing.Since the end of the 1990s, more products have become tailored to the eat now market, Key Note says. Single-serve packs of small cakes and biscuits have been developed for impulse buying, lunchboxes and other ’on-the-go’ occasions. Individually-wrapped items are now standard for many brands of small cake.The trends are being reflected right through the baking industry, from manufacturers and craft bakers back down the chain to equipment manufacturers. Tristan Hunt, marketing executive at Somerset-based Pullins Bakers, says there’s definitely more demand for single-serve packaged cakes and slices. Pullins supplies a wide range of products for the wholesale trade and is actively pushing further into individual cakes and slices. Last year, the firm launched a range of mini cakes which have proved popular with retailers, says Hunt. And it plans to increase its individually-wrapped cake lines to cater for demand.== Changing lifestyles ==Hunt says the increasing popularity of single-serve and snack cakes and slices is likely to be a result of people’s changing lifestyles. “People are busy and they are also more health-conscious; they don’t necessarily want a whole cake,” he adds.Kevin Pearce, bakery manager at Cheshire-based Chatwins, says younger bakery customers are more interested in flapjacks, fudge brownies and similar products than the slab cakes favoured by Chatwins’ older generation of customers.Slab cake sales have seen a steep decline in recent years, Pearce says, and while the bakery plans to repackage and relaunch the range, he believes the issue is generational. “Younger customers want to eat the cakes on the go, rather than taking them home to eat.”Proper Cornish – which started out as a pasty specialist and has recently moved into the biscuits and cakes market – launched a range of traybakes last year, which are supplied to bakery retailers, cafés and foodservice outlets via the wholesale trade. Mark Muncey, marketing manager, says snacking and eating on the go are trends that are having a marked effect on sales.Proper Cornish is now launching a range of individually-wrapped and branded slices, both to cater for demand and also to increase brand visibility.Market driversBritish Bakels also says convenience – and health – will continue to be one of the key drivers of the baking industry. The company commissioned an exclusive research report from Leatherhead Food International (LFI).LFI’s report says: “Cakes are inherently convenient, particularly single-serve and individually-wrapped products, which continue to drive market growth at present.” The report also notes that single-serve cakes account for half of the cakes market, and it quotes TNS Worldpanel data for 2006/7, which found cake slices had grown by 18%, while cake bars were up 17.2%.Bakels’ managing director Paul Morrow says the trend is very much down to changing eating habits, rather than specific health concerns. LFI’s report backs this up, pointing to snacking and lunches on the move as key drivers of single-serve cake sales. Fourteen per cent of lunchboxes now contain a cake, it says.The trend is filtering down to equipment suppliers, too. At the recent Interpack exhibition in Dusseldorf, machinery manufacturer Ilapak’s sales director Mike Butler told British Baker that its customers are increasingly asking for machines that can wrap and pack smaller items such as slices and other individual cakes. The UK’s café culture boom is a major contributor to the sales spike, Butler thinks.But the rise in popularity of single-serving cakes and slices does not necessarily signal the death of the whole cake market. Key Note says: “Portionability will remain an important factor for biscuit and cake products. The convenience of wrapped, single servings is becoming increasingly important as average household sizes continue to fall. However, there will also be counter demand for biscuits and cakes for sharing occasions.”last_img read more

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Pizza Hut Introduces New Boxes That Actually Work As A Turntable

first_img2016 is the year of innovation, and Pizza Hut just proved that with their new high-tech pizza box. The fast food giant teamed up with electronics company Novalia, and together they’ve created a functioning turntable pizza box. That’s right, a pizza box that actually plays music.Using conductive ink, Novalia printed two scratchable decks and controls for playback, pitch, volume, and crossfading right onto the serving apparatus. Even more, you can recycle that battery-powered box right into your computer or phone using Bluetooth, then connect it to any DJ software for it to become your newest source for entertainment. According to Exclaim, exact details of the product’s rollout will be revealed on Twitter. For now, the boxes will only be available at a few select locations in the UK. So fingers crossed this strange, but wonderful invention expands to the other side of the pond.For now, here’s an instructional video on the new technology:last_img read more

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Right time for ‘end-of-life’ talk

first_imgThe vast majority of patients with incurable lung or colorectal cancer talk with a physician about their options for care at the end of life, but often not until late in the course of their illness, according to a new study by Harvard-affiliated Dana-Farber Cancer Institute investigators published in the Feb. 7 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.The researchers found that such belated conversations tend to occur under particularly stressful conditions — when patients have been admitted to a hospital for acute care. And the doctor who shares in the end-of-life care talk is often a hospital physician rather than an oncologist who has treated the patient for much of his or her illness.Together, these circumstances may deprive patients of the opportunity for extended reflection and deliberation that would have been possible months earlier, when the conversation also could have occurred under less trying and hectic conditions, the authors suggest.“Previous studies have shown that patients who discuss their end-of-life care preferences with a physician are more likely to choose palliative, comfort-focused care over aggressive measures, and [to] receive hospice or other care consistent with their wishes. But studies haven’t looked at the timing of these discussions, or where and with whom they occur,” says the study’s lead author, Jennifer Mack of Dana-Farber/Children’s Hospital Cancer Center. Mack is also an assistant professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School (HMS).The new study, which involved 2,155 patients with stage IV (highly advanced) lung or colorectal cancer, found that 73 percent of the patients had a conversation about end-of-life care with a physician, according to medical records or an interview with the patient or a companion. Among the nearly 1,000 patients who passed away and whose records document an end-of-life care discussion with a physician, the median time of those discussions was 33 days before death.Other findings pertain to the location of those discussions and the type of physician involved. Of the more than 1,000 end-of-life care discussions in medical records, 55 percent occurred in the hospital. Oncologists documented end-of-life care talks with only 27 percent of their terminally ill patients in the study.Data for the study was provided by the Cancer Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium (CanCORS), a multi-region, population- and health system-based study of more than 10,000 patients with lung or colorectal cancer. Researchers interviewed patients at two time points and analyzed their medical records 15 months after diagnosis.“It’s encouraging to see such a high percentage of patients had end-of-life care conversations with a physician,” Mack says. “There’s a concern, though, that so many of these talks are taking place late in the trajectory of the disease.”Previous studies had estimated that fewer than 40 percent of patients with advanced cancer had end-of-life care discussions. Mack theorizes that this lower figure may reflect that earlier studies didn’t record end-of-life talks that took place shortly before patients’ death.Other research has suggested that physicians may delay end-of-life care discussions because of a natural reluctance to broach the subject, or because it conflicts with physicians’ problem-solving, hope-giving image. While such motivations are understandable, Mack says, they may work to patients’ detriment if they postpone the conversations too long.Mack and her colleagues are planning future studies to examine the quality and content of end-of-life care conversations, and then explore whether having such talks earlier in the course of illness can benefit patients.The study’s senior author is HMS Professor of Medicine Jane Weeks of Dana-Farber. Co-authors include Angel Cronin and Nathan Taback of Dana-Farber; Haiden Huskamp and Nancy Keating of Harvard Medical School; Jennifer Malin of the University of California, Los Angeles; and Craig Earle of the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research.The study was funded by grants from the National Cancer Institute, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, the American Cancer Society, and the National Palliative Care Research Center.last_img read more

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Why weeping willows bend and poison ivy doesn’t

first_img Growing plant stems and shoots exhibit a variety of shapes that embody growth in response to various stimuli. Building on experimental observations, researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences can provide a quantitative biophysical theory for these shapes by accounting for the inherent observed passive and active effects. Credit: Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences The research is published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface.“We have combined, in one theory, a plant’s ability to sense itself and its environment while being constrained by gravity and its elastic nature,” said L. Mahadevan, the Lola England de Valpine Professor of Applied Mathematics, of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, and of Physics. “By accounting for these factors, we can explain the range of shapes seen in nature without the need for complex growth strategies. This, in turn, implies that the diversity of morphologies seen in your garden may follow from very simple causes.”Mahadevan and co-author Raghunath Chelakkot describe plant shoots as “sentient,” meaning they can sense their own shapes and the direction of gravity and light through mechanochemical pathways.When these pathways are triggered by stimuli, one part of the shoot may grow relative to another and change shape. The shoots of the weeping willow, for example, try to grow upward, away from gravity and toward light. But, because they are so soft, the shoots sag under the weight of gravity and cascade toward the ground. On the other hand, poison ivy shoots start by growing downward before turning upward.How organisms sense and respond to these outside signals is important to understanding everything from plant growth to human development.“Different organs in our body grow and take on their characteristic shapes by responding to both internal and external signals, such as gravity,” said Mahadevan. “We do not yet understand how large-scale shape changes arise from a combination of sensing and growth, and our study attempts to look at one example of this.”Mahadevan is also a core faculty member of the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard.The research was supported in part by the MacArthur Foundation. It is well known that as plants grow, their stems and shoots respond to outside signals such as light and gravity. But if all plants have similar stimuli, why are there so many different stem shapes? Why do a weeping willow branches grow downward while nearby poison ivy shoots upward?Using simple mathematical ideas, researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) constructed a framework that explains and quantifies the different shapes of plant stems.A stem’s ‘sense of self’ contributes to plant shape <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VSY1Non2NAI” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/VSY1Non2NAI/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a>last_img read more

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Berger recognizes National Volunteer Week

first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr NAFCU President and CEO Dan Berger is reaching out to member credit unions and their volunteers today in recognition of National Volunteer Week, which began Sunday and runs through Saturday.This year brings the 41st anniversary of National Volunteer Week, established to celebrate volunteerism and recognize its contributions to communities and economic growth.“Credit union volunteers are the foundation of the credit union cooperative spirit,” Berger tells member credit union leaders. “They inspire by example so that others are motivated to serve. As our industry proudly serves more members each day, the service of our volunteer leaders continues to grow in importance and relevancy.” continue reading »last_img read more

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Open the door to new loan opportunities without sacrificing security

first_img 16SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Brian Timson Brian has held senior management positions in the financial services industry for more than 20 years. Focused on leveraging technology to improve the way that companies do business, he has … Web: www.alliedsolutions.net Details Year-to-year, community financial institutions have become more conservative about consumer lending. So as to not open themselves up to additional risks, many of these institutions tend to only service consumers with prime and super prime credit. However, consumers with non-prime credit make up a solid portion of the consumer lending market, so this desire to stick with “safer” loans leaves quite a few loan opportunities on the table. And when many community financial institutions are dropping their rates to as low as 0% in order to compete with large national lenders for prime and super prime consumers, missing additional revenue opportunities for your loan portfolio is not a small matter.To compound the challenge, Millennials – who present a massive lending opportunity for financial institutions – are often considered non-prime (due to having little-to-no established credit or having outstanding student loan debt.). So while fear of unwarranted risks keeps community financial institutions from supplying loans to these “risky” consumers, new non-traditional lenders are stepping in to swoop up these untapped loan opportunities. Market disruptors like retail lenders (i.e. Costco), mobile lenders (i.e. AutoGravity), and peer-to-peer lenders (i.e. Lending Club) are finding ways to bypass the existing banking system, credit bureaus and financing requirements to lend to this highly sought after demographic.If your community financial institution is avoiding non-prime consumers you are likely creating three major problems for your business:You are missing out on an opportunity to vastly expand your loan portfolioYou are isolating some of your key demographicsYou are losing out on new streams of revenueThe best way to drive loan yield is to expand and diversify your loan portfolio, so you are not missing out on any major opportunities. A whole host of solutions have surfaced in the consumer lending marketplace over the past decade that offer to help community financial institutions adjust their lending policies and criteria so they may begin servicing a greater portion of the borrowing population. These offerings primarily consist of collateral risk protection programs, expanded loan channels, add-on consumer offerings and digital engagement tools.Once you’ve adopted a number of these solutions, you can begin to experiment with various packaging and marketing strategies to differentiate you from your competition, attract new borrowers and generate much sought after non-interest income. The options to take advantage of are ever-evolving, and the opportunities offered through these solutions are endless. If you want to attract new loan customers, you have to set yourself apart from a growing list of competitors. The only way to do that is to offer the entire marketplace something other competitors cannot: end-to- end service, at the low cost only a community financial institution can offer.Contact Brian Timson to learn more about how you can expand and protect your consumer lending portfolio: [email protected] in learning more strategies for competing with traditional and non-traditional lenders? Read our white paper on “Stop Handing Over Auto Loans to Your Competitors”.Interested in learning more about effective marketing strategies? Read our white paper on “Consumer Engagement Channels: How and Where to Get the Most Out of Your Communications”.last_img read more

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Spanish acquisition

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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