San Leon buys 10% stake in ELI’s ACOES project in Nigeria

first_imgThe ACOES project comprises a new pipeline and a floating storage and offloading vessel San Leonto invest $15m and acquires 10% stake in ELI. (Credit: bertholdbrodersen/Pixabay.) Irish independent oil and gas company San Leon has announced an investment of $15m in Energy Link Infrastructure (ELI), which owns the Alternative Crude Oil Evacuation System (ACOES) project in Nigeria.The ACOES project, which comprises a new pipeline along with a floating storage and offloading vessel, is expected to start operations in few quarters.The project is planned to be constructed to facilitate a dedicated oil export route from OML 18 asset, which includes a new pipeline from OML 18 and a floating storage and offloading vessel (FSO).ELI expects the pipeline component of ACOES to have a throughput capability of approximately 100,000 barrels of oil per day, while the FSO has a storage capacity of 2 million barrels of oil.San Leon Energy chief executive officer Oisin Fanning said: “We are delighted to make this investment, which is in line with our strategy of investing in assets with near-term cash flow, where the initial investment is considered to be of limited risk and where there is material upside.“The ACOES is expected to generate regular cash flow once commissioned in the coming quarters, whilst also providing the significant benefits to downtime and losses reduction for OML 18 which we have previously described.”San Leon will receive a 10% equity interest in ELIAs part of the investment, San Leon will receive a 10% equity interest in ELI.ELI will also receive a $15m shareholder loan at a coupon of 14% per annum over 4 years, and repayable quarterly following a one-year moratorium from the date of investment.Under the terms of the transaction, San Leon will make the payment to ELI in two instalments, paying the first $10m in this week, and the second $5m planned for fourth quarter 2020 after Midwestern Leon Petroleum receiving the next repayment of loan notes.The ACOES project is expected to have a major effect on the operation of OML 18, mainly through the reduction of downtime and losses associated with the existing export route.Through its Nigerian subsidiary, ELI will earn fees for transporting and storing crude oil from OML 18 and potential third parties.Fanning added: “The structure of the transaction, which combines an equity investment in the project together with a loan, gives us the opportunity to generate a meaningful return from loan repayments in the coming years as well as looking forward to a longer-term dividend return from our shareholding in ELI.“Following the recent maiden special dividend paid to San Leon shareholders, the Company anticipates that equity income from the ELI shareholding will contribute to further future dividends to San Leon shareholders.”last_img read more

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Student discovers heart-shaped galaxy

first_imgAn Oxford graduate student has discovered what is thought to be the world’s first heart-shaped galaxy.Georgia Barrie, who specialises in the formation of ring galaxies, spotted the unusual galaxy, which had previously been classified by users of an online survey tool as ‘ring shaped’.Barrie estimates that the galaxy is 600 million light years away from earth, but has not yet established how it has formed.While there have been suggestions that it could have resulted from the collision of two galaxies, Barrie explained that investigating the formation of galaxies is a complex process, and will require extensive analysis of telescope information.last_img

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Area Boys & Girls Club to host free event for foster kids

first_img (Photo Supplied/bgcsjc.org) Area foster kids and their families are invited to a special event in St. Joseph County this week.Foster the Fun is the first project for The Keystone Club, which is a leadership group of teens from the Boys & Girls Clubs of St. Joseph County.The event was created as an opportunity for kids to connect with a night of music, dancing, food, games and prizes.The free event will be held on Friday, April 9, from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., at the O.C. Carmichael Jr. Youth Center on Sample Street in South Bend.Kids ages nine to 18 who are in foster care are welcome to attend, along with their families.Masks are required and COVID safety precautions will be in place.You can register for the event by clicking here. Area Boys & Girls Club to host free event for foster kids IndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market Facebook Twitter Twitter Google+ WhatsApp WhatsAppcenter_img Facebook Previous articlePurdue University releases 2021 commencement ceremony detailsNext articleName of recent Lake Michigan pier drowning victim released Brooklyne Beatty By Brooklyne Beatty – April 5, 2021 0 222 Pinterest Pinterest Google+ TAGSboys and girls clubFoster the FunfreeIndianaSouth BendSt. Joseph CountyThe Keystone Club last_img read more

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Two Charged For Allegedly Neglecting Horses In Cattaraugus County

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Pixabay Stock Image. NEW ALBION – Two Cattaraugus County residents are facing charges after Sheriff’s Deputies allege, they neglected horses this month.The Cattaraugus County Sheriff’s Office says Donna Truesdale, 41, and Steven Remington, 41, failed to provide proper food and water for the animals.Deputies say the horses have since been seized from an Otto Road property in the Town of New Albion.The two are charged under the state’s agriculture and markets law with failure to provide sustenance, proper food, water and neglect. They are scheduled to appear in the Town of New Albion court at a later date.last_img

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Idina Menzel & the Stars of Frozen Reunite!

first_imgWe’ve always hoped our four favorite Frozen stars—Idina Menzel, Santino Fontana, Kristen Bell and Josh Gad—spent their weekends hanging out, making snowmen and having epic snowball fights. Turns out, this is almost true! The fabulous foursome headed to the Vibrato Grill Jazz Club in sunny L.A. on February 9 to perform hits from the animated Disney flick and take home their very own gold records for the film’s soundtrack. Thanks to Frozen fans, the album has officially sold more than 500,000 physical copies. Check out this Hot Shot of the stars reunited in a much warmer climate, then pick up the Frozen album (featuring the Grammy-nominated hit “Let It Go,” of course) in stores now! Star Files Disney’s Frozen View Comments Idina Menzellast_img read more

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Douglas issues historic veto of Vermont budget

first_imgGovernor Douglas’ promise to veto the Vermont state budget unless lawmakers made drastic changes to the $4.5 billion piece of legislation were made official late yesterday afternoon when he returned the bill to the Clerk of the House without his signature. This is the first time in Vermont history that a governor has vetoed the budget. The governor has repeatedly said the budget spends too much, taxes too much and where it does make spending cuts, it makes the wrong cuts. Democratic leaders have been equally faithful to their belief that spending must both meet the added cost in state spending related to things like unemployment and welfare because of the recession, and also that state government, much like the federal government is doing, must assist in economic stimulus by infusing money into the system.Today, the special session of the Legislature will meet, presumably to vote to sustain or override the governor’s veto. However, the Democratic leadership will likely put their own adjustments to the budget before lawmakers first. Late last week, Speaker Smith and Senate Pro Tem Shumlin made concessions to the governor on some of his major objections to the budget. Those changes included on the unemployment insurance trust fund, language over how the governor can layoff state workers and not making an increase to the capital gains tax retroactive to the beginning of 2009. If the veto is sustained, lawmakers will have to work quickly to rewrite the budget to the governor’s satisfaction, because the new state fiscal year begins July 1.Below is the governor’s announcement of his veto, June 1, 2009:Statement of Governor Jim Douglas on his veto of H.441: It is with great disappointment that I return H. 441 to the Legislature without my signature. I had hoped that our budget differences could be resolved and compromise reached without the need for a veto vote. Unfortunately, an agreement could not be achieved. These are unprecedented economic times and Vermonters need their elected officials to work together to get our state through this recession. I pledge to continue to work with legislators of all parties regardless of the outcome of tomorrow s special session.Governor Jim Douglas issued the following veto message on H.441, An Act Making Appropriations for the Support of Government:Pursuant to Chapter II, Section 11 of the Vermont Constitution, I am returning H.441, An Act Making Appropriations for the Support of Government, without my signature because of my objections described herein. The task of building a balanced, responsible and sustainable budget that addresses the needs of Vermonters and their ability to afford their government is the most important duty of the General Assembly. Today, we find ourselves in the midst of a global recession making this task more difficult than in previous years. The path we choose will have a dramatic effect on future years. We cannot and must not sacrifice fiscal prudence and long-term sustainability to patch together a budget that leaves Vermont and Vermonters exposed to the perils of this recession.***In a few short months my Administration will begin work on the fiscal 2011 budget and by this time next year, legislators will have again cast their votes on a spending plan. According to the Legislature s Joint Fiscal Office (JFO), H.441 will leave a $67 million General Fund deficit that must be addressed at that time. Further, JFO estimates an even greater $141 million deficit for fiscal 2012 when federal stimulus dollars will no longer be available to help fill the hole. Together, the fiscal 2011 and fiscal 2012 deficits account for a staggering $208 million shortfall if H.441 becomes law. As early as January, when the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) was being debated in Washington, I warned of the risks of an over-reliance on federal recovery money. While these funds are intended to preserve services and avoid state and local tax increases, we cannot allow them to be an excuse to pass business-as-usual spending plans. Indeed, we are in unusual economic times. I warned lawmakers that using federal money to pass a budget that keeps spending on an upward trajectory would lead to huge challenges when ARRA funds run out. Unfortunately, H.441 does just that. Under this budget, spending increases by over 3% well above the current rate of inflation using one-time federal stimulus money. Spending in human services grows by nearly $150 million, or 5.6% though we already have the most generous social safety net in the nation, according to a recent New York Times study. I cannot support a budget that increases spending and, thereby, leaves such large shortfalls in future years, which Vermonters know will have to be filled by deeper cuts, higher taxes or a combination of both. And I cannot support a budget that shifts our challenges to tomorrow, when the consequences of our decisions will be even greater.***In addition to large deficits, the tax increases contained in H.441 compound the already significant struggles facing the people of our state. Vermonters are among the most heavily taxed people in the nation and it has often been observed that we have little capacity for higher taxes. Vermont native David Hale, a highly respected global economist, said in a recent news report that Vermont should, ¦ avoid tax increases that would undermine [the State s] ability to compete for jobs, compete for investment, compete for business. Yet, this budget asks Vermonters to contribute over $26 million in higher taxes $9.3 million in higher income taxes on senior citizens, small business owners, farmers and loggers from a combination of changes in how we tax capital gains, the elimination of the state and local tax deduction and other measures. I support a change in our capital gains exemption to treat earned and unearned income the same for tax purposes. However, I have been clear that any proposal must be revenue neutral and used to lower our very high marginal income tax rates not to support increased government spending. The Legislature s plan fails to meet this test as it does not use every dollar from changes to the capital gains exemption to lower income tax rates. Further, it does not exclude seniors who depend on capital gains in their retirement or farmers and loggers who take capital gains as a course of business. And it makes these changes retroactively, with no advance notice or warning, changing our tax structure after Vermonters have already made decisions about their money. What is so concerning about these tax proposals is that many of the changes did not receive a public hearing and will result in consequences that many lawmakers, and most Vermonters, do not fully understand. Changes to the capital gains exemption and the elimination of the state and local tax deduction will hit small businesses and farms particularly hard. In fact, more than 2,000 businesses will see an average income tax increase of more than $3,000. At a time when small businesses are struggling to make ends meet, these taxes will be devastating for them and their employees. Changes to the estate tax are also worrisome. This tax increase will have a dramatic impact on Vermont agriculture. Farmers seeking to pass their farms to their loved ones may be forced to sell a large portion of the farm to pay the higher death tax. The tax increases in H.441 are counter to Vermont s successful emergence from this recession. These increased taxes hurt those we depend on for a robust economic recovery farmers, small businesses and working Vermonters. I will not support increased taxes on our people so that state government can grow at an unsustainable rate.***As Vermont seeks to emerge from this recession it is critical that we make serious investments in economic development. Unfortunately, the Legislature failed to act on important initiatives and investments that are needed to create jobs and ensure a quick and strong recovery. In this economic crisis, there is no greater social welfare program than a good-paying job to give a struggling family hope and economic independence. Through ARRA, $17.1 million was made available to Vermont for flexible uses from the State Fiscal Stabilization Fund (SFSF). Earlier this year, I proposed spending these funds, over a two-year period, exclusively on economic development initiatives as part of a program called SmartVermont. I outlined a plan to spend the maximum amount available for fiscal 2010, $11 million, and the remaining $6 million in fiscal 2011. The SFSF dollars can leverage over $150 million in economic activity and job creation. H.441 dedicates only $4.1 million for job creation and, instead, uses $4.4 million of this one-time money to fund ongoing expenditures of state government building up base spending that will exacerbate our challenges in the coming years. As we strive to bolster our economy and compete for jobs in the 21st century, we need a highly educated and trained workforce. In recent years we have made substantial investments to meet this objective. H.441, however, takes us backward in our efforts to provide workforce training and higher education opportunities to the people of our state. This budget reduces workforce training funds, jeopardizing up to $7.2 million in federal stimulus funds, and zeroes out Next Generation scholarships for over 600 Vermont students tomorrow s nurses, engineers, police officers and inventors. Approximately $500,000 was cut from the Agency of Commerce and Community Development s Vermont Training Program, which will eliminate training opportunities for over 2,200 Vermonters and deny the state an important economic development tool. H.441 also reduces funding for the Vermont Telecommunications Authority (VTA) by $500,000 effectively shutting down the VTA by September. I will not support a budget that leaves this important economic development work unfinished. To provide economic opportunities for Vermonters in every corner of our state, we must continue to work toward the goal of universal broadband and cell phone coverage by the end of next year.***This budget fails to address the significant deficits we face in our Unemployment Insurance (UI) Trust Fund. There is broad consensus that the need to address the downward trajectory of the fund is urgent. While employers are understandably concerned about increased unemployment insurance taxes, especially in these difficult economic times, they recognize that a balanced approach that also makes reasonable adjustments to benefits is in the best long-term interest of all Vermonters. Failure to take action leaves a $160 million deficit in the fund by the end of next year. Vermont will be forced to borrow more money from the federal government that will have to be paid back with interest from the General Fund placing another burden on the backs of Vermonters and Vermont businesses. Any plan to address UI must be balanced and comprehensive. It is not enough to raise taxes on businesses and not make a reduction in our incredibly generous benefits structure. While some have suggested that freezing the maximum weekly benefit is a good start, that will not be enough. We must ask benefit recipients to take a modest $16 reduction in their maximum weekly benefit from $425 to $409, helping us begin to bend the curve and shore up this fund.***H.441 contains language that threatens the separation of powers among the branches of government and unduly burdens the Executive Branch as it carries out its constitutional responsibilities. One of the most troubling language additions interferes with the relationship between the Administration and the Vermont State Employees Association (VSEA). Legislative micro-management impairs the State s ability to carry out the necessary work that Vermonters demand and deserve of their government. H.441 prevents the Administration from implementing reductions in force without the approval of a legislative committee of 10, should negotiations be unsuccessful. It is the obligation of the Executive branch and its department heads to use their expertise and familiarity with their departments to manage the workforce and to make reductions in the least disruptive manner possible. The budget language impedes this responsibility to carry out the Executive s constitutionally-assigned function. H.441 also requires the Administration to conduct an incredible 40 new studies and reports, more than double the 17 required last year. Each of these reports and studies requires hardworking state employees to take time away from the programs they administer and the people they serve. Additionally, there are 4 legislatively-led studies that will require a minimum of 15 legislators to continue their work into the summer. Not only do these reports and studies take staff away from more pressing work, but they will cost Vermonters tens of thousands of dollars. In an effort to increase legislative control over the Vermont Housing and Conservation Board, language unrelated to the budget has been added that will change the composition of the board and eliminate economic development involvement. Such a policy change should be vetted through the normal committee process so that all legislators can understand the implications of this action. Further, within these very sections is a provision that ostensibly became effective upon passage by the house and senate. This is either a blatant disregard for, or a fundamental misunderstanding of, the Vermont Constitution that requires, [e]very bill which shall have passed the Senate and House of Representatives shall, before it becomes a law, be presented to the Governor ¦.***H.441 is a budget that fails the most basic test: it is not in the best interests of Vermonters. It needlessly increases taxes, it does not adequately address our economic development needs, and, perhaps most importantly, creates a more than $200 million deficit in future years. For those reasons and others, I cannot allow H.441 to become law with or without my signature. If this veto is overridden, legislative leaders shall carry the responsibility of this bill s effects squarely on their shoulders. Because my Administration must begin work on the fiscal 2011 budget shortly and because we still must address a more than $200 million deficit in the next two years, I will request from the Speaker of the House and the Senate President Pro Tempore their plan to address these shortfalls. If this veto is sustained, I will continue to listen to the ideas and concerns of lawmakers so that we can find common ground to craft a compromise budget in the coming days that meets the very real needs of Vermonters.last_img read more

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January 2014 Issue of BRO is Live!

first_imgAnother year down, another great rotation around the sun for Blue Ridge Outdoors magazine. We have enjoyed 2013 immensely, but now it’s out with the old and in with the new!We have exciting things planned for the upcoming year, and it all starts with this January 2014 issue of Blue Ridge Outdoors.The centerpiece of this issue is our Blue Ridge Outdoors Ultimate 100. We list 100 activities, goals, and hotspots to guide you through a year of outdoor adventure in the Southeast, mid-Atlantic, and Blue Ridge Mountains. Join the BRO staff in ticking off the adventures throughout the year. We’ll be updating our status year-round and we want to hear from you using #BROUltimate100. For more details on the project, check out the story.We also want to help you get 2014 started on the right foot, and that means keeping that New Year’s resolution to be more active and maybe even drop a few pounds before Easter. Our Adventure Fitness Guide gives you the tools to do just that by staying out of the gym and getting back to basics with natural workouts. We also list the top 10 outdoor jobs to strive for in the new year.In Departments, we interview the youngest A.T. thru-hiker in the history of the trail, the top female collegiate ski racer in the Southeast, and banjo virtuoso Bela Fleck on his new classically inspired album. Plus we list the best winter paddling gear, because the rivers don’t stop when the temperatures drop, and taste the newest innovation in brewing: beer concentrate for your next backcountry adventure. Then our experts get into the mix with a debate on whether CrossFit is bad ass or a bad idea.Welcome to 2014 readers! It’s going to be another great year.FeaturesThe Ultimate 100Adventure Fitness GuideTop 10 Outdoor JobsDepartmentsDebate: CrossFit – Bad Ass or Bad Idea?The Youngest A.T. Thru-HikerThe South’s Collegiate Ski ChampBackcountry BeerThe Best Winter Paddling GearTrail Mix: Bela Fleck Goes ClassicalEssayHow to Date a Paddlerlast_img read more

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Hope mixed with worry and uncertainty as football reawakens

first_imgFootball is re-awakening amid the COVID-19 pandemic but the sense of hope at teams which have started training is mixed with worry over whether it might be too soon and the uncertainty of how to keep players safe.On hold since mid-March, many European leagues are hoping to start up again in the next two or three months, without spectators, and training has begun in Germany and Austria. Yet re-starting remains fraught with difficulties.”There is a huge logistical and medical/scientific question about testing and protocols but also a social one,” said Jonas Baer-Hoffmann, secretary general of the global players’ union FIFPRO. “We need guidance and protocols on how to return in a healthy and safe manner. Football is a contact sport and we feel very high protection standards are required.”There was also a moral question. “Are we sending the right message to society, and are we encouraging a healthy return to normal life, or are we sending a bad signal that football has different rules to the rest of the world?” he added.On the other hand, the Swiss Football League said a successful re-start, under scientific supervision with a risk management concept, could allow football “to send a signal that it is possible to return to something closer to normality”.Several leagues around the world have produced a medical protocol for training, mostly along similar lines. These generally involve thorough testing of players to ensure they are not infected and dividing the squads into groups of six, observing social distancing guidelines.Yet many details for the re-start of competitions, such as whether teams would have to be isolated until the league is finished and what happens if a player tests positive, remain unclear.As Christoph Freund, sporting director at Austrian champions Salzburg, said on Tuesday: “It can’t be that if one player, or one accompanying person or a trainer, gets the virus that the whole round has to stop, or that things stop again for two or three weeks,” he said.Germany’s Bundesliga may well be the guinea pig as it is the closest of the major leagues to resuming. Like other leagues, it can only start with a green light from the government.On Thursday, the Bundesliga said players will be monitored by an appointed team health official and would have regular testing.An infection to a player will be reported to authorities who will be in charge of any other steps. The team, however, would not be automatically quarantined.Big questions Geoff Dreher, an assistant professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said there was not much point in re-starting if a single case resulted in a whole league being stopped again, while other questions also had to be answered.”If, on the home team, someone gets sick there, what do you do?” he told Reuters. “If it is on the away team and they are travelling, how do they respond and get back to their home location?””Are they happy with potential quarantine, with isolation from friends and family… for an extended period of time? That is a big question,” he added.”If one of my team mates got the virus, am I okay to continue to play? It (needs) input from a lot of people and I think the reason we don’t have a lot of ideas about this is because people are (still) trying to answer these questions.”There was also the question of whether there was enough staffing and resources to deal with ill and injured players — a natural risk in soccer.Carl Bergstrom, a biology professor at the University of Washington, said one possibility was a ‘bubble’ strategy where players and staff are isolated for the duration of the season.”The logistics of this would still be difficult,” he told Reuters. “Food has to come from somewhere. Medical care has to come from somewhere. Any contact with the outside world comes at a risk of infection.”An alternative would be to have a “weak isolation” from the outside world and rely on daily testing throughout the season.”This could work if testing capacity can be attained and infected individuals test positive before or around the same time they become contagious. If people can transmit while testing negative, this strategy would not work,” he said.Bergstrom added that the leagues would have to invest in testing to the extent they had excess capacity which they could provide to local communities, including hospitals.”Otherwise they risk a public relations disaster from taking tests away from those who need them more urgently,” he said.More than 2.64 million people have been infected by the new coronavirus globally and 184,910 have died.center_img Topics :last_img read more

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Nicklas ends Stanton’s win streak at Marshalltown

first_imgMARSHALLTOWN, Iowa (June 17) – Gene Nicklas won Friday’s IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stock feature, ending Eric Stanton’s perfect season at Marshalltown Speedway.Nicklas took command from David Simpson at lap four, and led all the remaining laps to the finish. His comfortable lead vanished when a caution came out on lap 13 for debris and bunched the field.On the restart, Stanton passed two cars, going from fourth to second and was looking for another miraculous win to keep his streak alive but it wasn’t to be, and he had to settle for second. This ended his perfect season at seven wins in a row.Leah Wroten, Gary Pfantz, and Simpson completed the top five.Adam Larson went home with the win in the Xtreme Motor Sports IMCA Modifieds, Donavon Smith won the IMCA Sunoco Stock Car feature and Sam Wieben was the winner in the Karl Chevrolet Northern SportModsLarson used the top side of the track to take home his first win of the season in the 20-lap Modified feature. Larson started eighth and was leading by lap seven. He put distance between himself and the pack until the closing laps when Joel Rust reeled him in.Rust’s attempt for more failed and he had to be content with a second place finish. Third went to Trent Jackson, fourth was Jacob Murray and Jon Snyder rounded out the top five.Jayme Duinink led the early portion of the Northern SportMod main and was soon having to hold back the fast-charging Wieben.Wieben bothered Duinink relentlessly until finally making the pass on the top side and taking the lead at lap seven. Wieben still led when a yellow flew at lap 14 but was able to hold the lead on the restart, and kept it to the checkers.Randy Roberts was second, Jared VanDeest finished third and Jake McBirnie and Curt Hilmer were fourth and fifth, respectively.Smith started ninth in the 20-lap Stock Car main and powered his way methodically to the front. He had to work his way by Michael Jaennette and Dave Atcher to take the lead at lap nine. From there on, he kept charge to the finish and the win.Damon Murty, last week’s winner, raced his way from 13th to finish as the runner-up. Third went to Austin Evens, fourth was Jaennette and Todd Reitzler was fifth.last_img read more

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Memorial services pending for Larry Larson

first_imgJerry Vansickel met Larson in the mid-1980s at an area go kart track. They’d become friends and frequent travel partners to tracks where Vansickel announced.  BUCKEYE, Iowa – Memorial services are yet to be scheduled for Larry Larson but when they’re held, friends will have countless stories to share of the race fan, pit crew member and National Anthem singer.  After the races were over, Larson joined more than a few drivers for victory lane photos, often displaying the checkered flag.  Larson, 59, passed away Tuesday, Jan. 21 at his home in Buckeye. White-bearded and almost always wearing a Rick Brown T-shirt, he was known for painting the lines in the pit area at Boone Speedway as well as singing The Star Spangled Banner at race tracks across the state.  “He was a fan turned crew member turned friend,” said long-time IMCA Sunoco Stock Car driver Brown. “Larry was at home when he was at the race track. He’d go up and down the pits and talk to everybody. He wished everybody good luck.” The Boeke Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. “Larry’s passion for the sport was second to none. He enjoyed the races and singing the National Anthem, but what he enjoyed most was the people,” related Vansickel. The number of people who knew him was just amazing. Larry was just a good, honest, wholesome human being. He was a great guy and liked by everybody.” last_img read more

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