WiFi rolled out across Greggs

first_imgGreggs is to install wireless broadband access across its 1,571 stores across the UK.The roll-out will start this month with 100 shops per week and will be completed by the end of summer, following a deal with provider The Cloud. Graeme Nash, head of customer and marketing at Greggs, the BB75 retailer, said: “We are constantly looking at ways of giving our customers a fantastic experience when shopping at Greggs. We have a number of outlets now with seating and our cafés and new coffee shops, Greggs Moment, are all ideal locations where our customers can benefit from free WiFi.”Vince Russell, managing director at The Cloud, said: “Greggs might not be the kind of brand you immediately associate with WiFi, but this deal shows how mainstream this technology has become.“It’s no longer the preserve of hotels or train stations, where businessmen log on to check their emails, it’s used by all sorts of people for everyday reasons, such as updating their Facebook, Twitter or Foursquare accounts when they’re on the go. It’s undeniable that the smartphone has changed consumer behaviour and now it’s changing the high street too.”It is believed that Greggs hopes customers will use it on their smartphones to pass the time when sitting in the café areas in larger Greggs outlets.last_img read more

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Link found between ALS and SMA

first_imgResearchers of motor neuron diseases have long had a hunch that two fatal diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), might somehow be connected. A new study confirms that this link exists.“Our study is the first to link the two diseases on a molecular level in human cells,” said Robin Reed, Harvard Medical School professor of cell biology and lead investigator of the study.The results will be published online today in Cell Reports.ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease, which has an adult onset, affects neurons that control voluntary muscles. As a result, muscles start to weaken, and patients eventually lose the ability to move their arms, legs, and other parts of the body. In contrast, patients who have SMA tend to be infants and young children. Symptoms are similar to ALS, with lack of ability to control muscles being the major symptom. In both diseases, the most common cause of death is the loss of muscle function in the chest, resulting in respiratory failure.Previous studies have shown that one of the causes of ALS is mutation of the FUS gene, and that a deficiency in a protein called the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein causes SMA disease. The SMN protein is present in bodies in the nucleus known as Gemini of coiled bodies, or gems. Reed’s lab connected the FUS protein to the SMN protein and the formation of gems in cellular nuclei.“Nobody really knows what the function of gems are,” said Reed. “The consensus so far is that they might be involved in biogenesis of crucial nuclear RNAs.”The researchers arrived at this pathway by studying human fibroblasts, cells that form the basis of connective tissue. “Unlike other studies of ALS and SMA, in which post-mortem tissue is normally used, we used fibroblasts from patients. These cells are easily accessible because they can be obtained from patients’ skin, and [they] may provide a better idea of what happens in the human body,” said Reed.Reed and colleagues began the study by showing that the FUS protein is essential for normal gem levels. Without it, gem levels in ALS fibroblasts are much lower than in control fibroblasts.This feature of ALS fibroblasts led the team to connect the disease with SMA. Previous studies had shown that when cells were deficient in SMN protein, fibroblasts also lacked gems in the nuclei. The loss of gems as a final result in both the SMA and ALS pathways led Reed and her team to believe that they might, in fact, be part of one larger pathway.“The question now is whether the loss of gems is a cause of the disease or a marker for the disease,” said Reed.Reed is hopeful that even if the loss of gems is a marker, it could be used as a diagnostic tool to determine whether someone who is presenting symptoms has ALS. “We will need to find out if the loss of gems is applicable to all cases of ALS or if it is specific to ALS patients with mutations in the FUS gene,” added Reed.Either way, Reed describes these findings as killing two birds with one stone. “This common pathway may mean common treatment and resources.”This work was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, as well as aid from Toyobo Biotechnology Foundation, the ALS Therapy Alliance, and the ALS Association.last_img read more

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[The Source Podcast] Dell EMC Forum 2017 Keynote, Minneapolis

first_imgThe Dell EMC Forum is a multi-format event experience designed for IT decision makers and executives seeking insights to cloud solutions and opportunities to engage with peers.“Realize your Digital Future”, this year’s Dell EMC Forum theme is all about helping IT become the business. Featuring executive keynotes and breakout tracks that cover Digital Transformation, Best of Breed Infrastructure, Converged Systems, Cloud Strategy and Workforce Transformation, the Dell EMC Forum offers something for everyone.Upcoming events in North America include: New York City, Chicago, Toronto, Boston, Montreal, Dallas, Vancouver, Seattle, Houston and St Louis. Register for the free event at www.dellemc.com/forumAaron Chaisson (@AaronChaison), VP Global Portfolio Messaging, was the Keynote Speaker for Minneapolis, MN. I caught up with Aaron in the field level suite of US Bank Stadium right after his keynote; that interview, and the full Keynote address is in this week’s Dell EMC The Source Podcast.Don’t miss “Dell EMC The Source” app in the App Store.  Be sure to subscribe to Dell EMC The Source Podcast on iTunes, Stitcher Radio or Google Play and visit the official blog at thesourceblog.emc.comDell EMC: The Source Podcast is hosted by Sam Marraccinilast_img read more

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Vermont Electric Co-op wins Service of the Year award from IEEE

first_imgVermont Electric Cooperative, Inc,The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Green Mountain Section presented Vermont Electric Cooperative (VEC) with the Service of the Year award during their annual meeting banquet dinner held on December 2 at the Inn at Essex. One of nine awards presented during the evening, recognized VEC for its role in driving improvements to the state of the art of smart grid technology and services.  Specifically IEEE commended VEC on its deployment of smart meters, and most significantly, the Cooperative’s effectiveness in demonstrating the benefits of smart meters to its consumers.  ‘Service innovation including information management, data analysis, and optimization helps create a more flexible and responsive grid’ says Pascal Nsame, the IEEE Green Mountain Section Chair.  ‘We are honored to have received IEEE Green Mountain Chapter’s Service of the Year award that recognizes VEC for its accomplishments’ said David Hallquist, CEO. ‘We believe we have only scratched the surface of our smart grid technology and will continue to seek innovative solutions that provide value to our members.’ In 2005, VEC began deploying automated meters to reduce outage frequencies and durations while reducing operating costs.  Since the introduction of a sophisticated outage management system in 2008, operations staff is provided with near- real time outage information to quickly develop effective system restoration strategies and send line crews directly to the source of outages.  Before smart meters, for example, crews often had to patrol VEC’s rural system on foot to locate outage points.  And when an outage occurs, information is displayed automatically on VEC’s website which provides consumers with outage details and restoration times. Another significant benefit is that with smart meters, VEC consumers are provided with detailed information about their electricity usage that can be used to make more informed decisions about power usage.   VEC’s wattWATCHERS web-based application, introduced in 2009, displays hourly and daily consumption data over a 90 day period.  More information about VEC’s Smart Grid Story can be found atwww.vermontelectric.coop(link is external). VEC is Vermont’s third largest electric distribution utility serving approximately 34,000 households and businesses in 74 towns throughout northern Vermont. Founded as a cooperative, VEC is locally owned by its consumers or members. A national leader in technology and innovation, including the use of automated meters, VEC has been providing energy solutions to Vermonters since 1938. The IEEE Green Mountain Chapter annually recognizes Vermont companies and individuals for significant contributions to the advancement of the engineering profession during its annual meeting banquet.  IEEE is the world’s largest professional association dedicated to advancing technological innovation and excellence in areas ranging from aerospace systems, computers and telecommunications to biomedical engineering, electric power and consumer electronics.  IEEE and its members inspire a global community through IEEE’s highly cited publications, conferences, technology standards, and professional and educational activities. For more information about IEEE visit: www.ieee.org(link is external)last_img read more

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Worth Dying For

first_imgThe recent death of champion freestyle skier Sarah Burke was nothing short of a tragedy. The world lost a young athlete with limitless potential. Sarah was as comfortable in the X-Games superpipe as she was on the red carpet, and she recently succeeded in getting the sport of free skiing into the Olympics. She was an icon, and her family, her sport, and her nation are still mourning her. That accident brings something to the forefront that we as athletes sometimes try to push out of our consciousness… the sports that we love can sometimes take our lives.The most disturbing part of Burke’s death is the circumstances. She was performing a routine trick in a non-competition setting, and was wearing proper safety equipment. She died as a result of a severed neck artery that led to cardiac arrest, and doctors said that better protective gear would not have changed the outcome. When events like this occur, they force us to explore the relationship with risk in our own lives, and ask the question: Is it worth dying for?This is a never-ending consideration that adventure sports athletes have grappled with. Climbers want to climb larger mountains, skiers want to ski more difficult lines, and kayakers want to push the envelope of runnable whitewater. These adventurous desires exist inside all of us, and those who possess a larger than normal helping are the ones who are out there pushing their sports to new levels. Climbing Everest, surfing the most massive waves that the planet can produce, or flying a wingsuit is inspiring to the rest of the world, and lifts the hearts of the entire human race to imagine the possibilities.But where do you draw the line? The inevitable reality of this flirt with the limits is that a few of us may actually find them. Passing away as a result of chasing what you love is something that is embroiled in controversy. You will probably hear as many opinions on this subject as the number of people you ask about it. But fatalities in the outdoors occur for a number of reasons, and are not always the result of negligence or bad decisions.Sometimes, things just go wrong. One saddening example of this was when professional kayaker Pat Keller lost his best friend on a remote river in British Columbia, Canada. The two were paddling together, and a freak surge sent the young man back upstream into a dangerous rapid after the two had walked around it.  Pat was helpless to assist, eventually falling into the river himself from his rescue efforts. He did everything that he could, and then made the walk out of that river all alone to find help.Nearly ten years later, Pat describes his bittersweet relationship with paddling:“As I get older, I have to constantly balance those risks with the consequences that I know are there. And oftentimes these days I find myself being more conservative.”This was an example of a misfortune that could not necessarily have been avoided. The other side of the coin is that the youth seem to have different proclivities with regards to risk today than in the past. Don’t get me wrong: every generation seems to have those opinions about the previous generation, but there are major societal forces at work today that influence the judgment and aspirations of the impressionable youth. Massive corporations are shifting their marketing budgets to enable willing athletes to push their sports to new heights through death-defying stunts. Extreme sports are edging their way into the mainstream via reality TV shows such as Nitro Circus, and people are now turning their attention from other traditional New Year’s Eve pastimes to watching hugely publicized motorcycle, snowmobile, and car stunts. It definitely seems as though “invincible” public figures are glorified, and although these stunts are extensively planned by professionals, the average teenager watching TV may not understand this. It would certainly be difficult to turn down: fame and riches in exchange for pushing your sport to its limits.Growing up as a whitewater kayaker, things weren’t always like that. As a kid, I was taught a solemn respect for nature and to never push it too far or too fast. Through the course of my life, I have definitely been told that what I do is foolish. I usually let that kind of thing slide, but it cuts a bit deeper when I hear it from family. I do not consider myself to have a death wish at all, and I look forward to a full life in which my contributions to the sport of kayaking are only the beginning of what I have to offer the world.I do not resent those who say these things to me, because I know that their feelings ultimately stem from fear. It seems as though Americans today fear a great number of things, but the recurring theme is the unfamiliar. Whether it is disease, terrorism or heights, we fear that which we do not understand, and subsequently judge those who don’t fear the same things. That is a dangerous state of mind, and flies in the face of the adventurous spirit that founded our country in the first place. What ever happened to the “go out and skin your knee” mentality that used to exist? Is it possible to have those same experiences via the Internet or video games? One interesting paradox lies in the fact that automobile accidents are a huge cause of death in the U.S., and most of us aren’t filled with dread when we put the key in the ignition every day.I will admit that I’ve had a few brushes with death during my 15 years of paddling whitewater. One instance in particular could easily have gone the other way. I was paddling the Chattooga River one Christmas Eve, and I managed to pin myself in a slot on one of the rapids of the dangerous Five Falls section of the river. My boat sank deeper and deeper as the force of the current wedged it into an underwater crack, and to my surprise I realized that I could not get out of the boat. The current was pinning me down, and my legs were trapped.The situation went from a fun, carefree day with friends to a struggle for my life in a matter of seconds, and as I flailed underneath the infinitely powerful waters of the river, I suddenly felt very guilty. How could I put my family through this on Christmas Eve? After my own death became a dire possibility and that thought flashed through my brain, I fought like I’ve never fought before. I very easily came to the realization that I wanted oxygen badly enough that nothing else mattered, and I somehow kicked off my shoes inside the boat, and made every effort to bend my legs sideways to slide out of the boat. In my mind, breaking my legs at the kneecaps was completely acceptable. They bent in a way that they never had before, and I tumbled out of my boat after over a minute of struggling. I couldn’t walk for a week, but I survived.That experience was a reminder of something that I already knew: the decisions that we make out there can have very real consequences. It also reinforced my determination not to die on the river. I have lived my life in a somewhat non-traditional way… doing my last year of high school by correspondence to travel, taking a year off between high school and university, and making the outdoors and discovery of nature a high priority in my life. If I were to pass away doing what I love, the people who criticized me in the past would say, “it was only a matter of time,” and would take my death as a validation of their own ignorant assumptions. I’ve always wanted to prove that the rat race is not for everyone, and that I can live my life the way that I love without compromise. That may take different forms as I grow older, but I hope that I can feel as though I’m doing that forever.So how do we reconcile ourselves with this (sometimes unavoidable) risk that comes with our sports? The first step in my opinion is to acknowledge that it is present, and to think very seriously about how much risk we are comfortable with accepting in our lives. This will help to guide every decision in the future, and will be different for every person.Once this is done, it’s important to become as educated as possible on the many ways to minimize that risk. No matter what your sport, it is important to carry with you the appropriate safety gear and know how to use it. Think avalanche beacons, pin kits, and medical provisions. The aim should always be to turn yourself into the biggest possible asset to your group, and as I write this I can think of a few ways that I will improve my own portfolio of skills this year.It’s also important to learn any lessons possible from past accidents or tragedies in your field. It is never productive to point fingers after an event like this, but knowledge can often be drawn from these events, and carried with us for use in case of a future crisis.Finally, when it comes down to the moment, we should affirm that the decision to go is for the right reasons. Taking a calculated risk should not be for the cameras, to impress anyone, uphold a reputation, or because it will create a legacy. Do it because it feels right, and because you are 100% sure that you can follow through successfully. Make decisions for yourself, and follow your gut.This dialogue brings up a final and pivotal question that seems to be at the heart of this fine balance: On a subconscious level, is this risk and the stark reality of our own mortality part of what draws us to these sports?Perhaps making life and death decisions and proceeding with confidence is in fact an infinitely purifying and rewarding process. Believing in your own abilities with the ultimate price on the line is something that few people have actually experienced, and that self-confidence can transfer to and carry value in any aspect of life, from business to relationships. There is a part of us that still needs to live the primal life. It is our way of facing the tiger and reacting swiftly and confidently.Our sports can be dangerous at times, but with humility and a safety-minded approach, they can provide a lifetime of joy.“The sensations one feels in these activities is comparable to falling in love,” says Keller. “You never know when your heart may break, but until that point, it’s all love.”For some amazing music from the likes of Great American Taxi and Paul Thorn check out this month’s Trail Mix!last_img read more

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Here’s a Presidential Campaign Trump Could Win Hands Down—And That’s No Lie

first_imgCan anyone ask for a more consistent track record?Eat your heart out, Bernie Sanders. While you’ve espoused the same values and principles for a few decades, the Donald has been lying his entire life.When questioned about his image, Trump supposedly replied: “Do I lie? Of course I do. I didn’t get to where I am today by telling the truth. But I love integrity!”Most impressive of all may be Trump’s delusional self-perception. A stretch, perhaps, for the Liar’s Club requirements, but let’s not forget that a delusional person is more likely to have little or no remorse when lying. And we know the Donald does not apologize even when caught red-handed.Who better to lead an organization of spin doctors than a man who comments that Mexican immigrants are rapists and criminals, and in the next breath says that he will win the Latino vote because the Latino voters love him? That’s lying bordering on the psychotic! He’s a shoo-in for the job.But who to select as his running mate? Those in Trump’s inner circle report that he is considering Joaquin Guzman Loera, aka El Chapo, the Mexican drug lord. Smart. Thinking outside the box. Who better than a billionaire drug smuggler to appeal to the Latino constituency? And, what’s more, El Chapo shows signs of being as delusional and grandiose as Trump. The New York Times reports that he has said that drugs destroy, but he has found no other way to make a living. When asked about the trail of blood he leaves behind in his drug business, El Chapo replies that all he does is defend himself. “But do I start trouble? Never.”And, most Trump-like of all, he had plans to make a movie about his life.A liar with international creds and box office potential.Told that El Chapo had been recaptured by the Mexican police, Trump laughed. “I’m rich,” he chortled. “Think those lowlifes won’t give me what I want? Think again. I’m a business man. I make deals. I want this guy. He’s tough. He’s a winner. I like winners.”Trump, fully aware of the birther issue, insists that he has uncovered documents that certify that El Chapo is actually an American citizen. Case closed.Can’t you just see it now? Masses of the faithful gather at a “Trump for Liar’s Club President” rally, waving placards that scream new Trump sound bites, keeping the Liar’s Club members in thrall:“Fake it ‘til you make it.”“The truth is overrated.”“We’re going to lie so much, you’re going to get sick and tired of lying.”They are hungry for more Trump–no matter what he says, no matter what his goals.And the Donald, poised to address them, dons his baseball cap, emblazoned with his new message: White Lies Matter   It goes without saying that we’re sick and tired of being lied to.But we love this guy.“A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its pants on.” ~Winston Churchill Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York “You long to ‘leap at a single bound into celebrity.’ Nothing is so common-place as to wish to be remarkable. Fame usually comes to those who are thinking about something else, – very rarely to those who say to themselves, ‘Go to, now, let us be a celebrated individual!’ The struggle for fame, as such, commonly ends in notoriety; – that ladder is easy to climb, but it leads to the pillory which is crowded with fools who could not hold their tongues and rogues who could not hide their tricks.”  ~Oliver Wendell HolmesBy Arnie DodgeDespite what happened in Iowa, Donald Trump may yet have his way and become the 45th President of the United States. If he does, his head is very likely to explode. The run up to the nomination is a narcissist’s dream. Imagine if he actually makes it all the way. The pressure on his psyche is sure to be uncontainable. At the Inauguration we may watch a blood-soaked Supreme Court Justice and five to 10 of Trump’s concubines—there to celebrate their emperor’s coronation–screaming in horror, as they witness the incipient leader of the free world self-detonating before their eyes.Now, let’s imagine that Trump does not win the election. He is a loser. In fact, he is the biggest loser. How can he possibly go on, his megalomania fatally damaged? What does he do? Go home and get under the covers? Build another Trump tower? Fire more employees. Offer a billion dollars to Kim Jong-un to step down so he can assume the presidency of North Korea? After all, president of some country is better than president of no country.Or, is there another possibility for fame? A post that may be more suited to his gifts. One that ensures that millions of his followers–still sick and tired of politically correct politicians—will stay the course and follow their leader.Rumor has it that Trump, should he lose the election, will try for the Presidency of The Liar’s Club.Herewith a quote from one of the members of the club found on “The Liar’s Club, A Blog by People Who Lie for a Living”:“Lying is essential to good story-telling. Daily, we writers . . . write down a bunch of untruths, piling one on top of another, page after page. We compound them, massage them, edit them, spin them, until we’re satisfied that, despite how outlandish or other-worldly these lies are, you the reader will swallow them.”Can there be a more appropriate leadership opportunity for the Donald?Getting ahead of the curve, sources report, he is already considering his Board of Directors.  Names on the short list are Charles Ponzi (posthumously), Richard Nixon (posthumously) and Bernie Madoff (ex officio).Circulating Trump’s bona fides for the new position will be an easy task for his team. His credentials for residency in the liar’s club executive suite will be drawn almost exclusively from his national presidential bid. Most would agree that Trump, during his rallies, the debates, the interviews with journalists, has taken prevarication to a whole new level, one that followers and detractors alike find breathtaking. The Trump brand, if you will.Gross exaggerations, sociopathic insults based on stereotypes, torrents of slurs and half-truths, outlandish (and transparent) contradictions, impulsively spewed epithets, calculated misstatements designed to reinforce his position, grandiose declarations about international issues that are stunningly incorrect, accusations based on hearsay, ad hominem attacks on rivals to divert attention from his inability to answer a question. And behavior, throughout these public displays, befitting a troubled adolescent: tantrums, bathroom jokes, rants, threats.last_img read more

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Cops: Freeport Man Killed in Motorcycle Crash

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 33-year-old Freeport man was killed Saturday morning when his motorcycle crashed into a double parked tow truck in his hometown, Nassau County police said. Edgar Menendez was operating a 1999 Yamaha motorcycle southbound on North Main Street at 10:20 a.m. when he attempted to change lanes and struck the rear corner of a double parked tow truck, police said. Witnesses at the scene told police that the motorcycle was traveling at “a high rate of speed,” police said in a news release. Menendez suffered multiple chest injuries and was pronounced dead at the scene, police said. The motorcycle was impounded for a brake and safety check, police said. The tow truck driver was issued a traffic ticket for being double parked, police said.last_img read more

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GE’s subsea systems for Eni’s Coral FLNG

first_imgItalian oil and gas company Eni has signed a long-term cooperation agreement with GE Oil & Gas for work on Eni’s offshore gas developments in Mozambique.GE said on Monday the agreement comprised a multi-year contract to supply subsea production systems, ancillary equipment and services for Eni’s recently approved Coral FLNG project in the Coral South FLNG project and is the first phase of Eni’s development plans for the Rovuma basin Area 4.According to GE, the agreement also covers Area 4 future potential upstream projects. It includes a separate five-year aftermarket services contract for Life of Field of the subsea infrastructure, plus one five-year option and five three-year extensions.GE Oil & Gas has secured orders for the Coral South FLNG from EEA for the supply of seven xmas trees, three 2-slot manifolds with integrated distribution units, MB rigid jumpers, seven subsea wellheads with spare components, a complete topside control system to be installed on the FLNG facility, and associated Services equipment and support including IWOCS and Landing Strings, tools, spares and technical assistance for installation, commissioning and start-up.“Coral South FLNG is the first major subsea development in East Africa and provides GE Oil & Gas with the opportunity to affirm our leadership in large bore technology and our standardized portfolio of subsea equipment and services for deep water projects,” said Neil Saunders, President and CEO of Subsea Systems & Drilling, GE Oil & Gas.  “As the only subsea production systems supplier in-country and in East Africa, it provides tremendous opportunities to grow our operations in the region and it further underlines our commitment to drive productivity and cost-efficiency improvements for global projects by building long-term relationships with industry players in place of more outdated transactional approaches.”Ado Oseragbaje, President and CEO of Sub-Saharan Africa, GE Oil & Gas, added: “With the award of this project in Mozambique following the recent OCTP Project in Ghana – with first oil delivered ahead of schedule and in record time-to-market – GE reaffirms its subsea leadership in Africa, operating in all the major oil basins and with all international and National Oil Companies. GE is committed to building capacity in Africa and with the Mozambique project, like we have already demonstrated in Nigeria, Angola and Ghana, we will continue to invest in the years to come, developing a local highly-skilled and motivated workforce.”The Coral South FLNG project, the first phase of EEA’s wider plan of development for the Rovuma basin Area 4, will see the installation of an FLNG facility with a capacity of around 3.4 MTPA, fed by six subsea wells and expected to produce up to 5 TCF of gas, with an anticipated start-up in mid-2022.Eni is the operator of Area 4, and holds 70% of the Area 4 Concession. Eni (71.43%) and CNPC (28.57%) are shareholders of EEA.last_img read more

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Deep Down to Supply Isolation Valve for Shell’s Vito Field

first_imgDeep Down has received an order from Shell for work related to its Vito development in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico.The order is for the design, engineering, manufacturing and installation of an isolation valve system on the Vito floating production unit (FPU).The Vito FPU will be a new facility located in the Mississippi Canyon, approximately 150 miles south of New Orleans, Louisiana, in water depth of 4,050 ft.The isolation valve system will be installed onto the FPU to provide shutdown of production fluids, the company noted.Ron Smith, Deep Down’s CEO, said, “This award highlights another step in the strong commitment Shell and Deep Down share, of ensuring a safe future for the oil and gas industry.”last_img

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