Milnesium cfr. tardigradum (Milnesiidae, Apochela, Tardigrada): a monitor of high altitude meiofauna on sub-Antarctic Marion Island

first_imgThe meiofaunal tardigrades Milnesium cfr. tardigradum, Echiniscus sp., and Macrobiotus sp. were extracted from high altitude moss and volcanic scoria samples on sub-Antarctic Marion Island. Gut contents of mounted Milnesium provided forensic evidence of a previously ignored diverse and abundant meiofauna including trophi of bdelloid rotifers, mouthparts and entire individuals of Diphascon sp. (Tardigrada).last_img

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Tabernacle to Build Viewing Plaza for Historic Tree

first_imgBy TIM KELLYThe preserved remains of an historic tree, a treasured relic linking the Ocean City Tabernacle to its founding and that of the city, will receive a new place of honor on the grounds of the house of worship, Pastor Jay Reimer said on Thursday.The tree, a cypress, was growing at a location near North Street in 1879 when the Tabernacle was founded, the same year as the town itself.The Reverends Ezra B. Lake, S. Wesley Lake and James E. Lake, all brothers, along with the Rev. William H. Burrell, dedicated the resort “under this tree with a prayer to God … as a Christian Seaside Resort,” states a plaque, which formerly stood in front of the tree, and will be re-installed.Pastor Reimer, who serves as president and chief executive officer, said the Tabernacle’s board voted to move the tree to a soon-to-be developed “Founder’s Plaza” on the grounds near the prominent corner of Sixth Street and Asbury Avenue.“This location has some of the best pedestrian and vehicular traffic on the island,” he said. “In this way many more people will have the opportunity to see it and learn about its history.”A plaque describes the historic significance of the tree in Ocean City’s founding as a Christian seaside resort in 1879.Pastor Reimer said Ocean City’s weekly Farmer’s Market in the summer, the block party, parades and many other events along Asbury will expose the symbol of the Tabernacle and city’s founding to a much larger audience in its new location.“Where it is located now, (indoors, in the building’s narthex, or antechamber) most people who visit Ocean City have access to it 16 times a year. This will enable so many more people, beyond those who come inside the Tabernacle, to see it 24-7.”He said the historic tree and its plaza are envisioned as a place to “honor and link the founders of the Tabernacle, as a place of prayer, and the City of Ocean City as a Christian seaside resort.”One of the tipping points for the decision to honor the tree was a letter Pastor Reimer received from a visitor to town who was disappointed the history tours of Ocean City did not include a stop at the Tabernacle.“It is hoped that by having such a prominent display, more people will learn of the connection” between the town and the house of worship, originally a camp meeting known as the Ocean City Association, Pastor Reimer added.Ocean City Tabernacle Pastor and CEO Jay Reimer, right, is shown with Philadelphia Eagles Chaplain Ted Winsley during a service in 2019.The tree is technically a large piece of petrified wood, he said, adding it was unknown when exactly the cypress died. The portion of the trunk stands an estimated 12 feet tall and has approximately 15 branch stumps extending from it.Pastor Reimer said steps are being taken to preserve the tree for its permanent home, including coating it with sealants to handle the weather, designing a raised viewing pedestal or platform of some kind and enclosing it behind fencing.“It has stood outside for all but about 15 years of the 140-plus years” of the Tabernacle’s existence, he said.This week, contractors removed the dirt and concrete from around the tree and moved it to an indoor location in preparation for the next step of placing it outside in the plaza.Pastor Reimer said that the removal of the tree will provide a clear view to the cross on the front wall of the sanctuary. The board members agreed that the first impression of those entering the building from the main entrance should be a cross.The cross is more reflective of the mission on which the Tabernacle is based, as a Christian house of worship “where the gospel of Jesus Christ is central,” he noted.At the same time, it was hoped the tree’s relocation will be a permanent symbol of “the prayer and faith of the founding fathers” of the Tabernacle, the pastor said.Ocean City Tabernacle is a spiritual, cultural and community anchor for the town.There is a practical reason for the change as well, Pastor Reimer explained. Removing the tree to an outdoor plaza frees space in the narthex for ministry events, social gatherings and special occasions such as the Christmas dinner that drew about 300 people last year.The upcoming Women of Faith Conference, expected to draw 250 women from most of the area’s churches on March 21, will benefit from the added space as well, he noted.It’s important, though, to celebrate what the tree has symbolized to the town and the Tabernacle. As part of the historic district, he said the founders mapped out the area bordered by Third and Eighth streets, from Central to Ocean avenues, and that more than 48 permanent homes sprung up within the first two years of the Tabernacle’s existence.“When you think about it, the founders were also the first planning authority and real estate board on the island,” Pastor Reimer said, adding that the founders would be pleasantly surprised to see how well Ocean City has evolved across the decades and endured as a family town.Now, he said, there will be a fitting place of remembrance and celebration of Ocean City’s earliest days and the vision of its founders.An early, undated photo shows the tree when it was alive on the Tabernacle grounds (Photo courtesy Ocean City Tabernacle) The tree, decorated with Christmas lights, prior to its removal from the Tabernacle’s narthex. (Photo courtesy of Ocean City Tabernacle)last_img read more

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Circles Around The Sun Announces 2019 Colorado Run

first_imgCircles Around The Sun will return to Colorado with a three-night run this January! Starting on January 3rd, the instrumentalists will perform at the Crested Butte Center for the Arts in Crested Butte. From there, they’ll head to the 10 Mile Music Hall in Frisco on January 4th and the Boulder Theater in Boulder on January 5th. Tickets will go on-sale this Friday, November 9th at 10 am MT here.Recently, Circles Around The Sun released a double album, Let It Wander, via Rhino, marking the first release since the band’s acclaimed 2015 debut record, Interludes For The Dead, which was composed especially for the set break music at the Grateful Dead’s “Fare Thee Well” concerts in 2015.Circles Around the Sun is comprised of guitarist Neal Casal and keyboardist Adam MacDougall (bandmates in the Chris Robinson Brotherhood), as well as bassist Dan Horne and drummer Mark Levy.After the January run, Circles Around The Sun will continue on the road with Greensky Bluegrass. For a full list of upcoming tour dates, head to CATS’ official website.last_img read more

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Students should know their rights, attempt to cooperate to avoid trouble with drinking

first_imgAs the school year begins and students attend off-campus parties, local lawyers’ advice is to understand not only the law, but also the value of cooperative behavior in encounters with police officers. Notre Dame Law School graduate Rudy Monterrosa said it is crucial for students to know the law. He practices law in South Bend and has experience defending students charged with alcohol-related offenses. “I do believe that it’s an issue that students do need to be aware of what their rights are and what they can and cannot do,” he said. Underage consumption of alcohol by a person under the age of 21 in Indiana is a Class C misdemeanor and an arrestable offense, said attorney Michael Tuszynski, of Stanley, Tuzynski & Associates in South Bend. Underage students who are stopped by police officers are often issued citations, Tuszynski said, which are also known as proxy arrests. In these cases, the offender is released based on a promise to appear in court when summoned. The decision whether to arrest or issue a citation is at the discretion of an individual police officer in each situation, although cooperation with the police can work to a student’s advantage, Tuszynski said. “A little bit of civility can go a long way,” he said.   In the state of Indiana, both the Indiana State Excise Police and city police can respond to situations involving alcohol. According to the state of Indiana’s website, the Excise Police are the law enforcement division of the state’s Alcohol and Tobacco Commission. “South Bend Police, they’re in charge of enforcing the laws here in the city of South Bend,” Monterrosa said. “Excise police specifically target certain types of violations.” City police typically would respond to a dispatch call such as a noise complaint about a party, Monterrosa said. They can issue citations, make arrests and also call in a unit of Excise Police. When either South Bend or Excise Police arrive at the site of a party, Tuszynski said a warrant is typically required to enter a home. “The home is sacred under the Fourth Amendment as well as Article 1, Section 11 of the Indiana Constitution,” he said. If a police officer knocks at a door, asks to enter and is granted permission, Tuszynski said the requirement for a warrant is waived. There are also exigent circumstances, which he said allow officers to enter a property without this permission. One such example would be a situation in which a person fled police by entering a home. “It’s extremely fact specific,” Tuszynski said. Monterrosa said if police knock on a door and see what appears to be criminal activity, such as very young people drinking alcohol, they have the right to investigate the situation. Once inside a residence, police officers may ask students for their identification and request they take a breathalyzer test, Monterrosa said. Students may refuse this test, but it is more likely they will be arrested if they do so. Without a breathalyzer result, there is no evidence the student was drinking. This lack of evidence makes it extremely difficult to charge the student with a misdemeanor, but they will likely be booked into jail. “And that’s the catch-22 that you’re in,” Monterrosa said. “Between a rock and a hard place.” If students take the breathalyzer test, Monterrosa said it is still a police officer’s discretion whether to arrest or issue a citation. “I would tell you that typically I don’t see too many people getting arrested for minor consuming,” he said. Tuszynski said students who are arrested must both post a bond and test below a certain blood alcohol level before they are released. Students who are on public property, such as a sidewalk, Monterrosa said, may be approached by police officers. In these cases, reasonable suspicion of underage consumption of alcohol is required for a breathalyzer test. “They call it a walk and talk,” he said. “In talking to them if they get any other information of a crime being committed then they can follow through with that. So an officer can go up to you and talk to you, but I’d say that they need to have at least reasonable suspicion that some criminal activity is going on.” Once students have either been released from jail or issued citations, they will receive a court summons in the mail, which makes it crucial that students provide police officers with correct and current addresses, Monterrosa said. Tuszynski said prosecutors will file formal charges, and cases are then resolved in one of three different ways: trial, plea or dismissal. There is also the opportunity for a pre-trial diversion program, which would involve a fine, community service hours and potentially other conditions. There is no criminal conviction associated with this program. Monterrosa said the pre-trial diversion program is a preferable option for students because the case never goes to court. They can qualify for it if they have no past convictions. “By no means should they ever proceed with a criminal case,” he said. “Especially if you’re at Notre Dame or you’re at Saint Mary’s, you’ve already worked that hard to get to that point. “But I think that it’s very best to have misdemeanor conviction avoided at all costs.” If the pre-trial diversion program is completed, Tuszynski said it is important to understand the charges are never erased from a person’s record. When graduate schools or employers ask students if they have been charged with a crime, students must answer yes. These charges would also surface if a background check is run on a student who had completed a pre-trial diversion program. Monterrosa said any traces of a charge may be erased through expungement, which can be done with the help of a lawyer, but is not necessary. Graduate schools and employers would only be truly concerned with whether an applicant had been convicted of a crime, he said. Regarding students over the age of 21 who host parties where alcohol may be served to minors, Tuszynski said the same legal process would apply. Posting a sign at a party forbidding drinking under the age of 21 might factor into the situation, but it would not protect the student hosts. “I certainly wouldn’t rely on that,” he said. “When you have a party and you serve alcohol, you really kind of put yourself in peril.” While Monterrosa said it is easier said than done, the only way to avoid encounters with the police is to avoid minor consumption, public intoxication or hosting parties at which underage students are present. Once a student is in a situation with the police, he said it is most important to be cooperative because the final outcome is left to police discretion. “Certain things are going to happen depending on whether you cooperate or not with law enforcement,” he said. According to Monterrosa, students also need to understand that they are a part of the city of South Bend. “I have to say if somebody’s having a party just keep it low key and keep it inside the house, but I guess it’s easier said than done,” he said. “I think people just need to be aware of what the laws are.”last_img read more

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Students, faculty join community to fight cancer

first_imgSteph Wulz This weekend, students, faculty and local community members will fill the Compton Family Ice Arena to fight cancer in the 10th annual Relay for Life.Andrea Romeros, a junior accounting major, and Erika Wallace, a senior Spanish and pre-professional psychology major, are the student co-chairs for this year’s event, which begins Friday at 6 p.m. and ends Saturday morning.“Relay for Life is a fundraiser for the American Cancer Society to celebrate those who are bravely fighting against cancer, remember those who we have lost and to fight back to end this disease,” Romeros said. “We have a lot of events planned for people of all ages this weekend.“There will be children’s games throughout the evening, performances by the Glee Club, Harmonia and Alligator Blackbird, and other fun activities such as a penalty box photo-booth and a mobile auction.”Romeros said 83 teams are currently registered for the event, which she hopes will raise $200,000 for Relay for Life.“The money goes toward support for caregivers and survivors and toward cancer research,” Romeros said. “Actually, Notre Dame has received 11 American Cancer Society grants totaling over $3 million for cancer research.”According to a University press release, Notre Dame Relay has raised more than $1 million for the American Cancer Society in the last 10 years.Each year, Notre Dame Relay selects two honorary chairs of the event from the Notre Dame community. The 2014 chairs are sophomores Patrick and Shannon Deasey, two of a set of triplets from Edina, Minn., the press release stated.“Both were born with a rare form of cancer, retinoblastoma, and were successfully treated as infants,” the release stated. “At 18, Patrick underwent treatment for a second time, to fight an osteosarcoma of the sinus.“Today, Patrick, Shannon and their brother Michael, also a student at Notre Dame, are cancer-free.”Romeros said a luminary ceremony is planned for Friday at 9:30 p.m. to celebrate the co-chairs.“This event is powerful because we take the time to recognize our two honorary survivor co-chairs, Shannon and Patrick Deasey, and we pledge to do our part to fight against cancer by walking around the ice rink throughout the evening, showing our solidarity with both the survivors and caregivers who have been affected by cancer,” Romeros said.Romeros, who first became involved with Relay for Life in high school, said working with the organization at Notre Dame is very rewarding.“[I’m] passionate about Relay for Life because cancer is a disease that, unfortunately, every person has a connection to, and we just want to do our part to join the fight,” she said.Activities will be held throughout the night at the Compton Family Ice Arena, the release said. Ice-skating, a photo booth, a broomball tournament, balloon twisters and face-painters are open to the public.In addition, public fundraisers, such as cupcake sales, T-shirt sales and auctions, have been held across campus this week in preparation for the relay, the release said.Friday, Notre Dame Relay will hold a mobile auction offering items such as framed prints, Blackhawks tickets and restaurant packages.A full event schedule can be found at relay.nd.edu.Tags: American Cancer Society, Relay for Lifelast_img read more

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Watch Ramin Karimloo & More Take On Prince of Broadway

first_img Star Files View Comments Finally we get to have a proper sneak peek of the long-in-the-works musical Prince of Broadway! The production celebrates the career of the 21-time Tony-winning director and producer Hal Prince and is currently making its world premiere in Japan. Although we’re still super-bummed that we don’t have enough air miles to check out the tuner in person, we do now have footage of Ramin Karimloo, Shuler Hensley, Tony Yazbeck, Emily Skinner and more taking on numbers from shows including West Side Story, Cabaret, Sweeney Todd, The Phantom of the Opera and Evita. Take a look at the video below…Next stop the Great White Way?center_img Tony Yazbecklast_img

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Taylor Louderman Starts Performances in Broadway’s Kinky Boots

first_imgTaylor Louderman(Photo: Bruce Glikas) View Comments Welcome to the Land of Lola, Taylor Louderman! The performer returns to Broadway in Kinky Boots beginning on January 16. She steps into the role of Lauren, replacing for Haven Burton, who took the stage for her final performance on January 15.Following her Broadway debut in Bring It On, Louderman took flight as Wendy in NBC’s Peter Pan Live! Her additional credits include off-Broadway’s Ride the Cyclone and Gigantic. On screen, she has appeared in High Maintenance and Shadowland.Featuring a score by Cyndi Lauper and a book by Harvey Fierstein, Tony-winning musical Kinky Boots has played more than 1,500 performances and recently surpassed Evita to become the 50th longest-running Broadway show of all time.In addition to Louderman, the cast of Kinky Boots includes Olivier nominee Killian Donnelly as Charlie Price, Todrick Hall as Lola, Shannon O’Boyle as Nicola, Daniel Stewart Sherman as Don and Marcus Neville as George. Kinky Bootscenter_img Show Closed This production ended its run on April 7, 2019 Related Showslast_img read more

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Blue Ridge Outdoors Holiday Gift Guide: Ideas for the Outdoor Enthusiast

first_imgNot sure what to wrap up for the outdoorsmen and women in your life this holiday season? Good news: we’ve done the hard work for you in our 2014 Blue Ridge Outdoors holiday gift guide. Here’s our take on some of the best gifts sure to please all year ’round.Green Guru Upcycled Zip PouchGreen-GuruGreen Guru is on a mission to give your gear an ecological makeover. Based out of Boulder, Colorado, these guys don’t let anything sit in the trash – bike tubes, wetsuits, climbing ropes, and plastic bottles all contribute to the magic. Recycled, or “upcycled”, old rubber bike tubes make up their line of Zip Pouches. These simple bags come in a variety of sizes, to hold anything from loose change to your phone, wallet, or travel accessories. Green Guru’s Zip Pouches redefine waste without sacrificing style or quality, and give your gift an extra kick with a creative background story.Wojo WalletA fancy leather wallet might impress your friends at the office, but won’t do so well in the great outdoors. The Wojo Wallet offers an alternative that can stand up to the elements while also cutting your wallet size in half. This minimalist storage system, made from tough silicone and neoprene, fits up to six cards in its main sleeve and can carry cash or a key under its secure outer band. The rubbery material keeps this wallet safe in your pocket, and protects against water or sweat. With Wojo, you won’t have to worry about losing your wallet during your outdoor adventures or ruining it along the way.SOG BladeLightSOG Blade LightThe name says it all: Blade + Light = BladeLight. This folding knife from SOG combines these two outdoor essentials into one compact product. The handle boasts six powerful LEDs built in at the base of the blade, carefully oriented to shine without shadows even when the knife is open. Each of the features can be used together or separately, so the choice is yours; cut, shine, or both. Nice and simple, the SOG BladeLight does the multitasking for you.Kavu Beber BeltThe scene: you walk in the door after a long day at play or on the job, ready to enjoy that refreshing beer you’ve been looking forward to. The problem: your bottle opener has gone MIA. Rather than put your teeth at risk or bang the bottle against the counter, look no further than your trusty Beber Belt. The Beber Belt from Kavu not only holds up your pants, but also solves this all too familiar beverage frustration with a built-in bottle opener on the buckle. The belt itself, made from sturdy nylon webbing, is easily adjustable and comes in three different patterns. You never know when beer will strike, so make like a Boy Scout and be prepared with the Beber Belt.Farm to Feet Wool SocksSecond only to a steaming hot tub, wool socks are one of the best ways to warm up those chilly feet when temperatures take a dive. Farm to Feet serves thisMount Airy important person with the added benefit of a 100% American supply and manufacturing process. Farm to Feet uses merino wool from sheep industry ranchers across the country, and produces their first-rate socks through local East coast factories. The Mount Airy sock and the Conover sock each work as an everyday versatile choice from the office to the trail, complete with a snug compression fit to give your foot that extra comfort it craves. The Mount Airy features full density padding all throughout the sock for the highest quality support, while the Conover favors a simpler design with lighter padding along the bottom of the foot. Plus, both socks come in fun and colorful patterns to make your morning dress routine just a bit more exciting. No matter your style or comfort needs, Farm to Feet gives the priceless gift of cozy toes.Rocket BearAs every parent on a plane with a screaming child in hand can tell you, traveling with kids can be a challenge. But there’s no denying the fact that global experiences have a big impact on young minds. So when travel plans don’t pan out, the Rocket Bear takes over. Rocket Bear, a unique subscription service, sends a postcard to your child every week from a different location. The postcard presents each place with a colorful picture of the bear on-site and interesting facts about his adventures. For either a sixth-month or full-year period, Rocket Bear makes the foreign world a little bit more familiar and gives your kids a present that lasts long past the holidays.Hydrapak Stash BottlehydrapackIt’s pretty obvious that water tops the list for any camping or traveling plan, but empty bottles can be a major burden for the weight- and space-conscious packer. Hydrapak‘s unique Stash Bottle, however, finally takes this issue off the table. The bottle stores 750 mL of water at a full height of 7.2 inches, but folds down to a mere 2 inches when empty. The collapsed disk is then small enough to fit in any compact pocket, freeing up those precious inches for whatever else you tow along.Backcountry: The Game of Wilderness SurvivalMost BRO readers will agree that hiking certainly makes for a day well-spent, but could sometimes use some extra perks – especially on a tired night after plenty of miles on the trail. Backcountry: The Game of Wilderness Survival first reared its head when the founders of Trailside Games, John Isley and Jason Butler, decided to bring a little more excitement to their quiet campsite during a long trip through the Tetons. The game, now available for a variety of backcountry locations (including our very own Appalachian Trail), uses a map and a set of instructional cards to lead players on a fantastical wilderness adventure within their own real one. Keep the thrill of the outdoors alive no matter where you are with a game of Backcountry in your pack.Oru Folding KayakOru kayakOru Kayak has tackled one of the most difficult problems to face boaters on the move – packing. Kayaks don’t transport well, either in the car or in your arms, and can turn a fun sport into a giant burden without the right planning. But with the Bay Kayak from Oru, your boating adventures don’t have to be a hassle. This innovative kayak features all the size, space, and quality of a standard recreational kayak, while also boasting extreme portability. When not in the use, the boat folds down from an impressive twelve-foot long water machine to a convenient 32 x 13 x 28 inch box. Both mobile and powerful, the Oru Bay Kayak is up for any challenge.Voltaic Solar ChargerNature doesn’t have charging stations. But for all those eye-catching sunsets and exciting summits that just beg to be remembered, Voltaic Solar Charger Kits can help keep your battery full and ready to capture that perfect moment. Available in a variety of sizes and powers, from 2 watts to 18, these chargers can handle your smartphone, camera, or full-on laptop. Simple, compact, and energy-efficient, Voltaic Solar Chargers make room for technology anywhere the sun may shine.SteriPEN UV Water PurifierSteripenWater may be easy to take for granted in the comfort of your own home, but unfortunately your kitchen sink can’t travel with you. Steripen Freedom UV Water Purifier makes it easy to stay healthy, safe, and hydrated throughout your outdoor adventures. In a mere 48 seconds, this turn that dirty stream water into your next clean beverage. Small but powerful, the 2.6 ounce Freedom UV Water Charger has all your best interests in mind.Bristol Rhythm and Roots Weekend PassBRRR Christmas Box 2We asked, you voted: The Bristol Rhythm and Roots Reunion, a celebration of musical and cultural heritage in the Blue Ridge, recently won the prestigious award of “Best Festival” in our annual reader poll. Now, the festival is offering the exclusive chance to attend the weekend event for only $50 with a discounted Weekend Pass Holiday Gift Box! Great experiences come in small packages, so wrap up a piece of future fun and start counting down the days.Oxygen PlusunnamedDon’t let high altitudes make your lungs angry. Oxygen Plus gives you the priceless gift of easy breathing, from base camp to the summit. Portable O+ Oxygen Containers store 95% pure oxygen in a variety of sizes to suit whatever heights and journeys call your name. The O+ Mini holds 24 full breaths in a mere 1.5 ounces, while the Skinni fits 50 in a “tall and trim” 8 inches and the Elevate Pack offers reusable refills. With these three styles to choose from a flavors ranging from Natural to Peppermint to tangy Grapefruit, Oxygen Plus has you covered.Fugoo Go Anywhere SpeakerFUGOO_Tough_JacketNo matter your choice of adventure, the Fugoo Go Anywhere Speaker is ready to put a soundtrack to your journey. Through wind and water, dirt and dust, this speaker can handle it all. In all its durable glory, the Go Anywhere Speaker can survive 3 feet of water for 30 full minutes, falls on concrete from up to 6 feet, and even a trip under your car tires. Plus, a 40-hour battery life keeps the tunes playing through every bump and bang.ThermaCELL Heated InsolesWarm feet are happy feet, and ThermaCELL wants to keep those piggies cozy this season.ThermaCELL InsolesStick these Heated Insoles in your ski boots, running shoes, or even your bedroom slippers to keep your feet ready for the cold. Choose your level of heat, from 100 degrees to 111, with the touch of a button on the included remote-control. Find full winter comfort in seconds with ThermaCELL, and thank your feet for a job well done out in the cold.ColdPruf Performance LayersShow those winter chills who’s boss with base layers from ColdPruf. Both Classic and Premium Performance lines offer warmth no matter what the weather report may read, from lightweight tops and bottoms of simple 100% merino wool to heavier pieces in polyester and spandex. Throw on some ColdPruf this snowy season and take those low temps by storm.Swix WaxSwix Wax KitGet your skis slop-ready with Swix, offering a full line of updated waxing gear for the fast-approaching snow season. Cera Nova X packs in a wide range of Glide Waxes and Cera F Powders, Liquids, and Solids for you to choose from. Completely redesigned and updated just this year, this quality wax will help protect your gear from all the winter wear and tear that lies ahead while also giving your slope style an added boost at every turn. Swix Wax will do you the favor of keeping both you and your skis at the very top of your game.last_img read more

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Fanny Brice: Huntington’s Hollywood Star

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York “Hello, Gorgeous!”Those were the first words spoken by Barbra Streisand in Funny Girl, a sanitized Hollywood musical about the vaudeville star and Broadway comedienne Fanny Brice. The lavish greeting could equally apply to the big summer house overlooking Huntington Bay that Brice owned from 1919 until 1946.One of the most famous performers in Ziegfeld Follies’ talented roster—along with W.C. Fields, Eddie Cantor, Billie Burke and Will Rogers, to name a few—Brice had a flare for the dramatic, on stage and off. At her Bay Avenue place in Halesite, she remodeled the front stairs, widening the bottom landing a few feet in the foyer so she could make a dramatic entrance to welcome her many guests and admirers.As Brice herself said, possibly in jest, “I’m a bad woman but I’m damn good company!”A posthumous winner of a Grammy, Brice never won an Oscar, although she did do movies as well as theatre and radio shows. For her many accomplishments, her star shines on Hollywood Boulevard’s Walk of Fame. Funny Girl was Streisand’s first film and it won her the Academy Award for Best Actress in 1968—although she had to share the prize with Katherine Hepburn, who’d starred in The Lion in Winter. The 86th Academy Awards ceremony is broadcast on March 2 this year. Although no musical is up for an Oscar—nor is Streisand a nominee—it is a fitting time to pay tribute to an entertainer born Fania Borach in New York’s Lower East Side, whose life links Huntington to Hollywood.Today Brice’s Bay Avenue property is lovingly preserved by Lynn and George Pezold. They bought it in 1982, not because the home had belonged to Brice but because they had been to a party there, and when the house came on the market a year later, they knew they wanted it. In fact, they didn’t know about Brice’s connection until afterwards.“We’ve learned so much!” says Lynn Pezold with a laugh, as she leans forward conspiratorially at the kitchen table, sharing anecdotes and coffee recently with visitors.Upon occasion, they put Brice’s portrait on their piano in the living room along with sheet music from one of her popular songs, like “Second Hand Rose,” on the music stand. The Pezolds had to replace the main beam because the first floor had buckled under the weight of the expanded staircase—not to mention the toll the termites had taken. The original owner, John L. Doughty, had built the main house in 1897 and added a kitchen in 1902. The Allard family bought it in 1911 and sold it to a fellow named Jules W. Arnold in 1919. That name was one of the aliases used by Nick Arnstein, Fanny Brice’s notorious gangster husband, who was a far shadier character than the way he’s played in Funny Girl by the suave Omar Sharif, who’d starred on the big screen in Lawrence of Arabia and Dr. Zhivago.“That house was the only thing Nick ever bought,” said Brice much later. “He made some money gambling and paid $14,000 for it. I paid $25,000 to have it remodeled.”“She added all sorts of ‘modern things’ to the house,” says Pezold. Brice added a wrap-around porch, expanded the back of the house with a big family room with a view of the harbor, as well as installing French doors throughout the downstairs to make it brighter, and enlarging the living room and the parlor space so they flow together better—perfect for big parties.But what Brice didn’t do was insulate her summer house, admitted Pezold with a feigned shiver. After Brice had sold the place and permanently moved to Los Angeles, where she died in 1951, a steam riser from the boiler in the basement was added to supply heat to the radiators upstairs, but unfortunately it thrusts right up through the vestibule by the front staircase that Brice loved so much.Fanny Brice, the quintessential Ziegfeld Follies vaudeville star, was immortalized by Barbra Streisand’s Oscar-winning portrayal in Funny Girl. For many summers after World War I Brice relaxed with her gangster hubby, Nicky Arnstein, and their young family in Huntington.The house in Funny Girl got the Hollywood treatment—portraying her Huntington digs as more of an opulent mansion than it really is.“To tell you the honest truth, I don’t think anything would have made Fanny happier [than seeing it that way],” says Lynn Pezold. “She was not afraid to get a nose job after she’d been a star of the Follies.”Love is blindAs for the passionate relationship at the center of Funny Girl, both the film and the original Broadway musical that had also starred Streisand deviated significantly from the real story—no doubt due to the fact that Arnstein was still alive during its development and itching to sue.When Brice first met Arnstein, he was still married—she found out later. His divorce only came through two months before their daughter Frances was born at their new Huntington home in 1919, according to Brice biographer, Herbert G. Goldman. Arnstein was part of a gang of swindlers that stole $5 million worth of Wall Street bonds in 1920 and he was wanted by the police. He’d already done time in Sing Sing for wiretapping fraud and so he went on the lam, forcing Brice to give birth to their son William without him around. Their son later became a successful painter and art professor at the University of California at Los Angeles, and was never mentioned in the movie by mutual consent with the film’s producer Ray Stark, his older sister’s husband.Brice worked feverishly and shelled out money constantly to pay for her husband’s mounting legal bills, but the law finally caught up with him. Arnstein spent almost two years in federal prison at Leavenworth, still claiming his innocence. In her revealing rendition of the song, “My Man,” which was a show-stopper both for Fanny Brice at the Follies in 1921 and Barbra Streisand on the silver screen decades later, she would sing, “But whatever my man is, I am his—forever.”Keeping Fanny Brice’s spirit alive in her former living room is Lynn Pezold. (Rashed Mian/Long Island Press)One story that Pezold has heard since they’ve owned the Halesite home was about the time Brice decided to throw a surprise party for her husband. Through the French doors leading from the kitchen, Arnstein saw the guests arriving before they could see him. He took off down the hill, grabbed a cab on East Shore Road and took a train from Huntington into Manhattan. At another occasion, Brice was entertaining when a fire broke out in the attic—Pezold says the burnt embers can still be seen up there—but the hostess didn’t want the party to break up. She pretended that she had also invited the men from the Halesite Fire Department to attend, and made sure they stayed for food and drinks—after they’d put out the fire.Her husband’s relationship with the department, however, was reportedly much rockier. Arnstein had set up a casino for the firemen’s fair one summer and, Pezold says, “Nicky bilked them out of $500,” so a wealthy neighbor had to chip in to cover the shortfall. She learned that story from the benefactor’s grandson. Recently Pezold heard from a local woman about an encounter her great aunt had had with Brice when she was working as a maid next door, where a school stands today. The maid and her friend had ventured into Brice’s apple orchard.Lynn Pezold, who with her husband George, have owned the entertainer’s vintage Halesite house since 1982. (Rashed Mian/Long Island Press)“They didn’t think anybody was home and suddenly the light came on, and Fanny came out on the porch, and said, ‘Who’s there?’ The girl said, ‘It’s just us and we’re stealing your apples!’ They had stuffed the apples in their bloomers—that’s how old the story is!” says Pezold. “And so Fanny just started laughing, and said, ‘There are more apples than I could ever eat. Enjoy!’”What finally caused Fanny Brice to run out of patience after 15 years with Arnstein was when she found out he was having an affair with an older, wealthier woman. As she told Marjorie Dorman, a reporter for the Brooklyn Eagle in 1928, a year after her divorce, “I’m done with a home and I’m done with men.” But there were rumors to the contrary, the reporter persisted, mentioning Arnstein and the Broadway impresario Billy Rose.“Talk about my being reconciled with Nicky is just bunk,” said Fanny Brice at the time. “No, I’m not going to marry Billy Rose or any other man. I’ll tell you what—if I ever saw a romance coming in my direction that looked dangerous, I’d run the other way.” And then she elaborated, Dorman wrote, “that showed her a bitter woman than one would have quite anticipated in view of her rattling line of comment, her devil-may-care attitude.” Brice told the reporter, “I don’t think any man can be happy with a woman who has a career.”Unfortunately, Brice may have been right about the men she was with—although she held onto the house in Huntington and bought bigger ones in L.A., and she did, indeed marry Billy Rose in 1929, only to divorce him in 1938. But had she been born in a different time, she may have been proven wrong.Funny, how it all works out sometimes—and how sometimes it doesn’t come close.last_img read more

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Armed robber holds CU branch employee hostage for more than six hours

first_imgAn armed robber walked into the Rockford, Ill.-branch of the $375 million Heritage Credit Union Friday, holding a 39-year-old female employee hostage for six and a half hours when he allegedly sexually assaulted her, according to Rockford police investigators.Shortly after 2:30 p.m., Rockford police and authorities from four other local, state and federal law enforcement agencies responded to a robbery in progress at the credit union’s branch at 5350 East State Street.SWAT team members surrounded the credit union and established contact with the suspect, Nicholas August, 39, of Rockford.Investigators learned that August entered the branch and threatened employees. He then took a female employee hostage and ordered the other employees out of the branch. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

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