Marcus King Jams With Eric Krasno And Marco Benevento In Charleston [Gallery/Videos]

first_imgFortunately, photographer Ellison White was on hand to capture this great show! Check out the photos below. Last week, Eric Krasno and Marco Benevento joined forces for a double billed run of shows in the Southeast. The two stars ended their run at the Pour House in Charleston, SC on October 22nd, where they had the pleasure of welcoming guitarist Marcus King during the performance. As if Krasno and Benevento weren’t enough to bring out the music loving fans, King has become a rising star and amassed a loyal following as well in the Southeast. This meeting of the minds was surely a remarkable way to spend a Saturday evening.Krasno and King put down a great version of “Them Changes,” and King also sat in for an extended period during Benevento’s set. You can watch videos of Benevento with Marcus King below, courtesy of yuforic. Load remaining imageslast_img read more

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Water, life, and climate change in South Asia

first_img Strengthening Harvard’s ties to South Asia The monsoon is often referred to as India’s “finance minister,” writes author Sunil Amrith, because the economy of South Asia is so deeply tied to the amount of rainfall the monsoon brings each year — filling aquifers, irrigating agriculture, and driving hydroelectricity. But climate change is threatening to shift its patterns, making it more erratic, with the potential to destabilize livelihoods throughout the region. In fact India just had its driest June in five years due to a delay in monsoon rains, according to government data. But in parts of the country recent heavy rains have brought deadly floods.In his latest book, “Unruly Waters: How Rains, Rivers, Coasts, and Seas Have Shaped Asia’s History,” Amrith, the Mehra Family Professor of South Asian Studies and chair of the Department of South Asian Studies, traces the intricate role water plays in the interconnected economic and social structures of South Asia and tells the stories of people and institutions that have undertaken massive efforts to harness water and control its distribution.Q&ASunil AmrithGAZETTE: How would you describe the summer [or southwest] monsoon to someone who has never experienced it?AMRITH: It feels like the world is dissolving. Both the intensity and the pervasiveness of water during those months of the year are what characterize them. And if you’re in a big city like Mumbai, you are certainly in this “floating city” to some extent.I think one of the defining features of the monsoon climate is its period of waiting, which is culturally very resonant in South Asia. Going back to the great Indian epic poems, you have this account of waiting for the rains to come, and of course they come after the heat has built and built and built through April and May. The phrase often used is “the burst of the monsoon.”GAZETTE: It’s fascinating to realize that all the rivers that course through South Asia originate in the Himalayas. What is the relationship between the mountains and the monsoon in terms of supplying water to the region?,AMRITH: They are such an integrated system. The Himalayan rivers are year-round rivers because they are supplied and fed both by rainwater and by snowmelt from the mountains. But they vastly increase their volume during the monsoon season from April to September, so it really is a sort of feedback loop between the meltwater of the Himalayas and the rains. The Himalayas also act as a barrier to the southwest winds, concentrating most of the rainfall on the Indian Gangetic Plain.Increased snowmelt and the recession of glaciers have major implications. A recent study shows that the rate of snowmelt is even worse than we feared. And so it’s precisely the interaction between seasonal rainfall, the enormity of the Himalayas — which have such an effect on the world’s climate that they have been called the “third pole” — and the sheer number of people who depend on these waters that positions South Asia at the front line of climate change. The fact that so many of these rivers cross national borders complicates all of this.GAZETTE: Which parts of the monsoon system are thought to be affected by climate change?AMRITH: All of it. For example, if the oceans are warming faster than the land, which many studies have shown to be true, that actually narrows some of the thermal contrast needed to drive the monsoon system. This may be one reason why the monsoon system has not behaved as many models would predict that it should, with many studies suggesting a diminution rather than an increase in mean annual rainfall, despite surface warming.GAZETTE: Although you are not a scientist, you’ve had to become a student of climate science in order to write this book. Based on your understanding, to what extent is there scientific certainty that the monsoon is changing?AMRITH: Based on my reading of the climate science, and my discussions with scientists, there’s reasonable confidence that the monsoon is changing, but huge uncertainty about exactly how and exactly why and on what timescale. I think the overall patterns around which there is something of a consensus is that there’s been a rise in extremes.What rainfall there is tends to be more concentrated in periods of very intense precipitation. An important study suggests that there’s been a decline in average rainfall of about 7 percent since the 1950s, though some suggest this has reversed over the past few years. What is clearer is that the monsoon has been more prone to extremes of wet and dry.GAZETTE: In order to redirect water from the rivers, India and other countries in South Asia went through a period of dam building in the 1950s and 1960s. Subsequently, India went through an extensive period of well digging to access groundwater in the 1970s, which led to the so-called Green Revolution. Which of these two approaches had the most impact?,AMRITH: Dam building did not play a major role in the Green Revolution. It was mostly driven by access to groundwater [digging wells, pumping water out of the ground].I think we can accept two things about the Green Revolution as both being true. One is that it saw absolutely astonishing gains in food production. So, for the first time in the 1970s, India became self-sufficient in food, which it hadn’t been since the late 19th century — if not before that. China too saw enormous increases in agricultural production without any expansion of the amount of land given over to agriculture.And, alongside this, I think we need to acknowledge two negative effects of the Green Revolution. One was dramatic deepening of rural inequalities, so that the gap between those farmers who benefited from the Green Revolution and those who did not grew ever sharper in India. The poorest farmers today in India are those who still have access to no irrigation whatsoever. So, there’s the inequality question, but there’s also the sustainability question. Regions of India that most benefited from the Green Revolution — the northwest, Punjab, parts of western India, parts of southeastern India — have water tables that are critically depleted today. So, it is not clear whether that model of agricultural expansion is inherently sustainable.GAZETTE: Do people in India today have to pay for water?AMRITH: Some do and some don’t, and that’s part of the question of inequality. Groundwater is essentially a free resource for those who own the land and who have the technology to drill — and there are many who argue that that shouldn’t be the case because, in a sense, groundwater is a public good, a public good that is captured as a sort of private gain for those who own land. On the other hand, many of the poorest people in India do have to pay for their water, particularly those who live in underprivileged urban neighborhoods. They pay the so-called “tanker mafia” for access to water. So, the questions are: Who pays for water and who pays for electricity? One of the stories behind India’s so-called groundwater revolution is that large farmers have enjoyed heavily subsidized energy, which they used to power the pumps that dig wells. That has had perverse effects in terms of inequality.GAZETTE: What are examples of “downstream” consequences in the accessing and controlling of water? “South Asia is interesting for one simple reason: This is an example of a large and complex society that has always lived with and has devised many distinctive ways of managing climatic uncertainty, long before anthropogenic climate change.” Lakshmi Mittal family gift expands opportunities for regional engagement Related Student-run nonprofit at Kennedy School wins innovation competition A lifeline to India’s farmers on the edge of despair AMRITH: In many ways the control of water was part of the post-independence project of democratization in India. The idea was that harnessing water would liberate Indian farmers from being prisoners of the monsoon, and that they would be able to access irrigation water year-round.Things didn’t turn out that way, and I think one of the tragedies of the story is that those large dam projects ended up deepening inequalities. If you think of the vast numbers of people displaced by these large dam projects in India — that’s not random. It has tended to be people from marginalized Adivasi communities who lose their land, because it is taken over by the giant reservoirs that dams create. They are not compensated; they are uprooted from their lives and their livelihoods because they are denied the political power to negotiate with the state. Some of the largest social and political movements in Indian history in the late 20th century have had to do with large dams and mobilizing against some of their effects.GAZETTE: Thinking about our current global climate crisis, what lessons can we draw from South Asia’s experience that might suggest a way forward?AMRITH: South Asia is interesting for one simple reason: This is an example of a large and complex society that has always lived with and has devised many distinctive ways of managing climatic uncertainty, long before anthropogenic climate change.More immediately, progress made in South Asia has always been as a result of political pressure and mobilization. One of the features of the history of South Asia since the 1970s and 1980s is its powerful environment movement — one that has been an inspiration to movements in other places and which might continue to be so. By no means have they always been successful — probably more often than not they haven’t.Finally, the history of water in South Asia adds weight to the many voices in the debate about global climate change saying to us that we really have to think more about inequality. Yes, climate change is a shared problem on a planetary scale. But it affects some people much more profoundly than others, and some people have many more resources to deal with or mitigate it than others do. That, for me, is the biggest lesson that comes out of my book and my work on South Asia. We need to put inequality at the heart of the story when we are thinking about climate and climate change. The other lesson, and the note on which I end “Unruly Waters,” is a conviction that the sharing and harnessing of water never has been, and never could be, purely a technical question. It is a political, moral, and economic issue. There is no quick solution to these problems, and yet we remain addicted to technological fixes.This story has been edited for clarity and length. To read the full story, visit the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs.last_img read more

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Asia Today: S. Korea steps up virus prevention for holiday

first_imgSEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korean officials are taking steps to limit travel and gatherings during next week’s Lunar New Year’s holidays as they fight a steady rise in coronavirus transmissions. More thermal cameras will be added, train operators will be allowed to sell only window seats and passenger vessels are being restricted to half capacity. Travelers must wear masks at all times, and eating at highway rest areas will be prohibited. A Health Ministry official announced the plans on Wednesday while repeating a plea for people to stay home. Lunar New Year is celebrated around Asia and a popular time for people to visit their relatives. China also has tried to discourage travel during the holiday to avoid the risk of viral outbreaks.last_img

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Eat more chicken

first_imgThe poultry industry in Georgia has grown steadily since the 1940s. Like all of agriculture, poultry has had its share of ups and downs. Right now, it’s facing a perfect storm created by high corn prices, escalated fuel prices and a down economy. Georgia produces 1.4 billion birds and 3 billion eggs annually, giving poultry an economic impact of more than $13 billion a year on the state of Georgia. The industry also accounts for more than 100,000 jobs. “If Georgia were a country, we’d be the fifth largest producer in the world,” said Mike Lacy, University of Georgia poultry scientist and head of the poultry science department in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Most of the cost of producing poultry meat and eggs is in the feed. In July 2010, corn cost about $3.50 per bushel. By June 2011, corn had jumped to $8 a bushel. Fuel costs have increased almost as fast as feed prices. And a tough economy worldwide has kept demand for meat and eggs at a lower level than experts predicted. As a result, poultry producers have not been able to raise prices sufficiently to balance out higher feed and fuel prices. To bring supply and demand into balance, producers are reducing flock sizes. Small flock sizes will help them be more profitable, Lacy said.Despite the downsides, the future of the poultry production in Georgia is bright, Lacy told a group of Georgia Farm Bureau members assembled in Athens, Ga., for their annual commodity meeting. Demand for poultry meat and eggs will increase as the world’s population grows and the economies of developing countries inevitably improve. “Being in Athens gives our experts [at Georgia Farm Bureau] insight into the research taking place at UGA, and they have the opportunity to talk about policy issues in the industry,” said Zippy Duvall, Georgia Farm Bureau president. “It also gives researchers the opportunity to hear from producers and learn what issues they have, as well as making connections at UGA that can benefit them on their farms.” Duvall is a poultry farmer in Greensboro. Despite the uncertainty of the industry, he is rebuilding and remodeling his entire poultry operation. “My comfort comes from being a grower for one of the most profitable plants in the state,” Duvall said. Duvall attributed some of the decreased demand for Georgia poultry products to trade policy. “We’ve been left out of the world marketplace, and we need to support bilateral trade,” he said. For poultry to grow, Lacy said that Georgians would have to continue to invest in research and technology. Current UGA poultry research projects include searching for alternative feed ingredients for poultry diets, identifying genes in chickens that allow more efficient use of feed, increasing egg production in broiler/breeder flocks and attempting to skew sex ratios to favor male or female offspring.last_img read more

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LandVest Announces New Project Manager

first_imgWoodstock– The Woodstock, Vermont, office of LandVest, Inc., a Boston based real estate firm and the Christies affiliate for the northeast, announces the addition of Janine Williamson Kanzler, Project Manager to its team of real estate sales personnel.Janine has lived in Vermont most of her life and began her real estate experience in the 1980s with Georgina Williamson, Inc. in Woodstock. Janine brings an extensive knowledge of the Upper Valley area and historical insight of Woodstock to the LandVest team.If you are considering listing your property for sale, or looking to buy that perfect new home, Janine can be reached at 802-457-4977 or [email protected](link sends e-mail).last_img

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U.S. fracking giants prepare for repeat of 2016 collapse, expect little help from Wall Street

first_imgU.S. fracking giants prepare for repeat of 2016 collapse, expect little help from Wall Street FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Bloomberg:Two of the world’s biggest oilfield service companies are warning of a bigger shale crash than the one that hit the U.S. and Canada just five years ago.While the decline in North American drilling rigs could approach the lows seen in 2016, the drop could be much faster this time around, Schlumberger Ltd. told analysts and investors Tuesday on a webcast hosted by Scotia Howard Weil. And as the most financially troubled oilfield service providers seek to stay afloat, there’s not much help this time around, Halliburton Co. said on the same webcast.“Wall Street is shut to the industry,” Lance Loeffler, chief financial officer at Houston-based Halliburton, said during the webcast. “There is no more lifeline. Financial markets aren’t lending their support.”Halliburton, which generates most of its business in the U.S. and Canada and leads the world in fracking, is planning for the possibility that nearly two thirds of rigs in the region could be shut down by the final three months of the year. Schlumberger, the world’s biggest overall oilfield services provider, said it’s slashing its own spending by as much as 30% in 2020.While changes to rig activity generally lag the movement of oil prices by several months, shale explorers have wasted no time cutting where they can. Oil drilling in the Permian Basin of West Texas and New Mexico, home to the world’s biggest shale patch, plunged to its lowest level since the nadir of the last crude-market slump in early 2016.At its worst, the U.S. rig count could see a 70% drop over a six-month period, eclipsing the greater than 60% cut in 1986, according to Raymond James.[David Wethe]More: Fracking giants warn shale crash will be faster this timelast_img read more

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Long Island Press Co-Publisher Featured on News 12 Long Island

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York News 12 Long Island named the new co-publisher of Long Island Press one of “12 Making a Difference,” a monthly segment highlighting locals that work to make a difference in others’ lives.Vicki Schneps-Yunis, who last week bought the Press with her son, Joshua Schneps, was featured on the local news channel for her work in founding Life’s WORC, a nonprofit group dedicated to helping people with autism and other developmental disabilities learn to be independent.“Vicki has been a trailblazer since she started the organization over 40 years ago,” Life’s WORC CEO Janet Koch told News 12‘s Elizabeth Hashagen in a story that aired Friday.The nonprofit group recently opened The Family Center for Autism in Garden City and offers comprehensive services to more than 1,200 people as well as provide running group homes to over 250 more adults with disabilities in Nassau and Suffolk counties as well as Queens.Vicki founded the group in 1971 out of the needs of her daughter, Lara, who was a resident in the baby buildings of the infamous Willowbrook State institution on Staten Island. She gave interviews to reporter Geraldo Rivera, helping him expose deplorable conditions there before she and her husband filed a federal class action lawsuit that closed the institution.“I get it about, what the parents have gone through, because I’ve been through it,” Vicki told News 12 Long Island.last_img read more

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H1N1 FLU BREAKING NEWS: Working while ill, Sanofi’s vaccine, ICUs could be swamped, China first to vaccinate, Canada’s vaccine deliberations

first_imgSep 21, 2009Poll: Many workers feel pressure to work when illMore than 80% of workers feel pressure to come to work when sick, and 69% have received little direction from employers on pandemic H1N1, according to a survey released today. The poll of 1,028 employees by Mansfield Communications found that 84% of workers believe the recession creates more pressure to show up for work, even when they’re feeling sick. Mansfield’s Rob Ireland said that employers need to communicate clearly about extended sick-leave policies and how to minimize disease spread.http://www.reuters.com/article/pressRelease/idUS58759+21-Sep-2009+BW20090921Sep 21 Reuters storyUS orders 27.3 million more doses of Sanofi vaccineThe US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has ordered another 27.3 million 15-microgram doses of pandemic H1N1 vaccine from Sanofi Pasteur, bringing the total government order of Sanofi vaccine to 75.3 million doses, the company announced today. HHS had previously ordered a total of about 195 million doses from five companies. Sanofi’s H1N1 vaccine and versions made by Novartis, CSL Ltd., and MedImmune were licensed by the Food and Drug Administration last week.http://www.vaccineplace.com/docs/US_ADD_ORDER_H1N1_VACCINE_ENG_210909.pdfSep 21 Sanofi press releaseSanofi projects mid October for US vaccine deliveryAn official from Sanofi said today that the company would begin delivering pandemic H1N1 flu vaccine to the United States by mid October, the Associated Press (AP) reported. Chris Viehbacher, head of the France-based company, said Sanofi would be able to produce at least 800 million doses of pandemic flu vaccine per year.http://www.wtopnews.com/?nid=105&sid=1767120Sep 21 AP storyWHO’s Chan says severe cases could overwhelm ICUsMargaret Chan, director general of the World Health Organization (WHO), told a WHO Western Pacific regional meeting today that the overall clinical picture of the pandemic H1N1 virus is reassuring, but health officials are increasingly concerned about a small group of patients who rapidly become severely ill. Though numbers have been small, they could burden intensive care units as infections spread. She said the second wave of the pandemic appears to be beginning.http://www.who.int/dg/speeches/2009/WPRO_ceremony_20090925/en/index.htmlSep 21 Margaret Chan speechChina begins immunizing studentsChina today became the first country to start administering the pandemic H1N1 vaccine, Agence France-Presse (AFP) reported. Medical workers are vaccinating students who will take part in National Day celebrations. Health workers, border inspectors, and transportation workers will also be among the first to receive vaccine, followed by the military, police, children and their teachers, and those with chronic conditions.http://health.yahoo.com/news/afp/healthfluchina_20090921133554.htmlSep 21 AFP storyCanadian experts applaud deliberate vaccine process|Some of Canada’s infectious disease experts are applauding the country’s decision to put its pandemic vaccine through the full approval process, rather than speeding it through with an emergency use authorization, the Canadian Press reported. One expert said the vaccine uses an adjuvant that hasn’t been used before, and a more thorough and deliberate review could avoid future problems and build public trust in the new vaccine.http://www.google.com/hostednews/canadianpress/article/ALeqM5g3xUqfcj5tds9LjeSUvnZSpdrJQASep 20 Canadian Press storyHealth departments’ job losses accelerateBudget cuts forced public health departments to cut 8,000 positions between January and June, according to a new survey from the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO). The trends reflects a big increase in the continuing erosion of the health department workforce, which lost more jobs in the first 6 months of 2009 than all of 2008. The news comes as departments prepare to launch two immunization campaigns, one for seasonal flu and the other for the pandemic H1N1.http://www.naccho.org/press/releases/0921.cfmSep 21 NACCHO press releaselast_img read more

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Weekly Update: Protecting Women’s Reproductive Rights, Standing Up for the Middle Class, and Fighting the Opioid Epidemic

first_imgThis is bad policy and a giveaway to the uber-wealthy and corporations. I urge Congress to vote no and work on real reform that benefits the middle-class. I am also gravely concerned that the trillion $ deficit from this bill will be used to cut programs like Medicare & Medicaid. https://t.co/8BtQT0Saxt— Governor Tom Wolf (@GovernorTomWolf) December 19, 2017 Weekly Update: Protecting Women’s Reproductive Rights, Standing Up for the Middle Class, and Fighting the Opioid Epidemic December 22, 2017 Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf By: The Office of Governor Tom Wolf SHARE Email Facebook Twitter The Blog,  Weekly Update On Monday, Governor Wolf was joined by Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney, legislators, local elected officials, and women’s reproductive rights advocates to veto Senate Bill 3. This bill would have severely limited women’s reproductive rights and health care options.“This legislation is a disingenuous and bald-faced attempt to create the most extreme anti-choice legislation in the country,” Governor Wolf said. “This legislation is an attempt to criminalize the decisions that women make about their own health care, and this legislation destroys health care options for victims of the horrors of rape and incest. For these reasons, I am vetoing this bill today.”The Governor continued his mission to support Pennsylvania’s working class by expressing his concern about the GOP Tax Bill on Tuesday. In a letter, the Governor urged Congress to vote no on the bill, noting the increased tax burden it would have on the commonwealth’s middle class, as well as concerns of potential cuts to Medicare and Medicaid because of the trillion-dollar deficit this bill would create.Multiple pieces of legislation came to Governor Wolf’s desk this week for his final approval. The Governor signed legislation that would regulate recovery homes to continue his fight against the heroin and opioid epidemic. He also signed a four-year funding plan to continue Unemployment Compensation operations through Pennsylvania’s Department of Labor and Industry.“I want to thank the House and Senate for working with my administration to create this compromise plan that provides an infusion of funding for the unemployment compensation system,” said Governor Wolf. “The agreement allows the commonwealth to provide much-needed stability to the system for dislocated workers, businesses and state employees.”Governor Wolf addressed Congress again this past Wednesday, joining a bipartisan group of governors to support the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. The Governor noted that each of the participants of this program have grown-up, been educated, and established their lives in the United States. The Governor has made it clear that the deportation of DACA recipients would be cruel, and Congress needs to act to protect the nearly 800,000 American immigrants that are enrolled in this program.On Thursday, Governor Wolf attended the United Way of the Capital Region to discuss the organization’s workforce development pilot program and address the importance of giving during this holiday season. The Governor noted the importance of donating his salary every year, as it helps programs like these which help the un- and underemployed obtain jobs where they earn a living wage.Continuing his commitment to fight the heroin and opioid epidemic, Governor Wolf joined with grandparents and their grandchildren, whose parents have been affected by the opioid crisis. By listening to individuals who have been directly affected by this crisis, the Governor is better able to reach real solutions to this complex and dangerous problem.“Make no mistake about it – we are in a fight, and these families are the victims of a disease. I pledge to continue to focus our energies and resources on stopping this crisis because we can no longer allow our neighborhoods, our communities, and our families to lose their loved ones to this disease.”Governor Wolf’s Week, December 17 – December 23, 2017Monday, 12/18/17Governor Wolf Vetoes Anti-Choice Bill that Severely Limits Women’s Health Care OptionsGovernor Wolf Announces Resource Guide to Help Evacuees from Puerto Rico and Other Devastated AreasTuesday, 12/19/17Wolf Administration Approves Two More Facilities to Begin Medical Marijuana ProductionGovernor Wolf Signs Legislation to Regulate Recovery HomesGovernor Wolf Urges Congress to Vote No on Tax Reforms that Prioritize the Wealthy Over the Middle-ClassWednesday, 12/20/17Governor Wolf Signs Unemployment Compensation Funding SolutionAhead of Holiday Travels, Governor Wolf Announces More Tools Available to Public via 511PAGovernor Wolf, Bi-Partisan Governors Urging Congress to Allow Dreamers to Remain in U.S.Governor Wolf Announces Approval of Funding for 125 New Community Projects Through Neighborhood Assistance ProgramThursday, 12/21/17Governor Wolf Visits United Way of the Capital Region to Discuss Workforce Development and Highlight the Importance of GivingGovernor Wolf Signs Executive Order Strengthening Fight Against Invasive Pests, Dangerous Plant SpeciesGovernor Wolf Acts on LegislationGovernor Wolf Visits Grandparents and their Grandchildren Whose Parents Have Been Affected by the Opioid CrisisFriday, 12/22/17Governor Wolf Appoints Karen Farmer White as State Board of Education ChairGovernor Wolf, DHS Rebuke Congress for Failing to Reauthorize CHIP Before HolidaysGovernor Wolf Acts on LegislationHighlights from TwitterI just vetoed the most restrictive anti-choice bill in the country because PA women don’t need Harrisburg politicians making their health care decisions. #SB3 pic.twitter.com/BVkMeOTFye— Governor Tom Wolf (@GovernorTomWolf) December 18, 2017last_img read more

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A former prime minister calls for foreign assistance to deal with investigations into alleged fire bombing incident

first_img Sharing is caring! 18 Views   no discussions LocalNews A former prime minister calls for foreign assistance to deal with investigations into alleged fire bombing incident by: – July 26, 2011 Share Sharecenter_img Tweet Share Mr. Edison James, former prime minister of Dominica. Photo credit; uwpdm.dmFormer Prime Minister and General Secretary of the United Workers Party Edison James is calling for the expertise of foreign nationals to assist in the investigation of a fire bombing at the home of former magistrate Mr. EmmanuelJames told a press conference organised by the UWP on Monday that the state led by the Chief of Police seems to be on a public mission to discredit a confession.“We have heard the Police Commissioner say that Mr. Emmanuel has never given a statement. I was at Mr. Emmanuel’s home on the morning when the police arrived and I saw and heard the police speaking to him. I do not know why the commissioner would say that” he said.There is a mystery and a lack of clarity around the situation with respect to one of the persons of interest.“The Police Chief has given the impression that he doesn’t know where the individual is, he has to make arrangements with his colleagues to contact him, yet we heard an interview that the individual is not in hiding and he is willing to come back…the public needs answers in this regard,” he said.He said the police must question Senior Council Anthony Astaphan regarding his role in all this.James said the authorities must get independent investigators to asist them in investigating this situation, and that the public lacks confidence in the local authorities.Dominica Vibes Newslast_img read more

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