Assemblage level variation in springtail lower lethal temperature: the role of invasive species on sub-Antarctic Marion Island

first_imgIt is widely held both in the physiological literature, and more generally, that the average characteristics of species within an assemblage differ among sites. Such generalizations should be based on investigations of whole assemblages at sites, but this is rarely done. Here, such a study is undertaken for virtually the full assemblage of springtails found at sub-Antarctic Marion Island, by investigating supercooling points (SCPs) of 12 of the 16 species that occur there. Assemblage level variation tends to be less than that documented for assemblages across northern hemisphere sites but similar to that found at some Antarctic locations. Across this set of species, the mean SCPs of the indigenous species (mean +/- SE = -17.2 +/- 0.4 degrees C) do not differ significantly from that of the invasive species (-16.3 +/- 0.7 degrees C). Overall, the introduction of several species to the island does not appear to have led to functional homogenization (for this trait). By combining the assemblage-level SCP data with information on the abundances of the species in each of four major habitats, it is also shown that severe but uncommon low temperature events could substantially alter species relative abundances. By resetting assemblage trajectories, such events could play an important role in the terrestrial system at the island.last_img read more

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Rose announces signing of Nate Hansen to NLI

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPROVO, Utah – BYU men’s basketball coach Dave Rose announced today that Nate Hansen has signed a National Letter of Intent to play for the Cougars.Hansen hails from Provo, Utah,  and plays for former Cougar Kevin Santiago at Timpview High School. In 2017-18, the 6-foot-3 guard helped lead the T-Birds to a record of 17-7 overall and 8-2 in region play while averaging 15.1 points and draining 53 3-pointers. He scored in double figures 18 times, had 20-plus points six times and registered season highs of 30 points, nine assists, eight steals and six 3-point field goals. Hansen plays for the Utah Mountain Stars and plans to serve a mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints following high school.“Nate is a tenacious competitor with an ability to really score the ball,” Coach Dave Rose said. “We love Nate’s feel for the game and believe he will be a great player here.”Other signees will be announced as their letters of intent are received. Written by November 14, 2018 /Sports News – Local Rose announces signing of Nate Hansen to NLI Tags: BYU Cougars Basketball/Nate Hansen/National Letter of Intent Robert Lovelllast_img read more

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Indiana Conservation Officers Announce Appointments

first_imgIndiana DNR Law Enforcement Director Danny L. East has promoted 4 Indiana Conservation Officers to serve in various administrative and leadership capacities.Operations Major Terry Hyndman has been appointed to Lieutenant Colonel/Executive Officer.  Lt. Col. Hyndman began his career in 1985 as a field officer in Marshall County.  He was promoted to District 1 First Sergeant in 1995 and served in that capacity for 2 years before being promoted to the South Region Captain in 1997.  Hyndman was promoted to Operations Major in 2011.  Lt. Col. Hyndman is a 2002 graduate of the FBI National Academy in Quantico, Virginia. The Lieutenant Colonel acts as the Executive Officer for Director East and provides oversite and supervision of the operations, budget and administration of the Law Enforcement Division.Captain Jason Lee has been appointed to Operations Major.  Major Lee began his career in 1998 as a field officer assigned to Johnson County later transferring to Brown County.  He was promoted to District 6 Lieutenant in 2009 before being promoted to South Region Captain in 2011.  He is a 2014 graduate of the FBI National Academy and a 2016 graduate of Police Executive Leadership Academy (PELA).  The Operations Major provides statewide supervision and oversight of operational needs of the ten districts and 2 regions.Lieutenant Tim Beaver has been appointed to South Region Captain.  Captain Beaver began his career as a field officer assigned to Bartholomew County in 2003.  He was promoted to District 6 Lieutenant in 2011 where he provided supervision, leadership and administrative duties for 20 officers.  He is a 2011 graduate of the IMPD Leadership Academy.  The South Region Captain will provide oversight and supervision for the southern 5 district lieutenants.Sergeant Shawn Brown has been promoted to District 10 Lieutenant.  Lt. Brown served as a field officer in LaPorte County from 1995 to 2013 before being promoted to District 10 Corporal.  He was then promoted to District 10 Administrative Sergeant in 2014.  District 10 consists of 7 counties in the extreme northwest portion of the state and is home to thirteen Indiana Conservation Officers.  He is a 2014 graduate of the IMPD Leadership Academy.“I am very proud of the accomplishments of each of these leaders” said Danny L. East, DNR Law Enforcement Division Director.  “The vast duties and responsibilities of an Indiana Conservation Officer require leadership from people who have knowledge, wisdom and experience to fill the leadership role and these men have demonstrated those qualities.”FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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IS IT TRUE MAY JUNE 26, 2017

first_img IS IT TRUE that the federal government has been running housing programs for years intending to help people of limited means keep a roof over their heads with housing subsidies?…some such programs involve placing people and families in housing projects that are administered entirely by public servants?…these programs in their beginning were started with the admirable goal of helping people temporarily with the intention that they improve their skills and learn to manage their lives so that they can return to the real market rate world and cease being a burden on the taxpayers?…over time these programs often failed to rehabilitate lives and ended up trapping people in the cycle of dependency known as being permanently dependent on the generosity of the American taxpayer to keep a roof over their heads?IS IT TRUE many government housing projects over time have degraded into violent places where illegal activities such as drug trafficking and prostitution are prevalent?…for people of potential to become trapped into permanent dependency in violent neighborhoods was never the intention of any of the federal housing programs but for many recipients of this generosity violence and lawlessness is a way of life?…it is time for such programs to be reformed and refocused on the original goal of changing life for the better instead of turning people with potential into permanent wards of the state?IS IT TRUE federal housing programs also work and get worked by private investors in real estate through the Section 8 voucher programs?…these vouchers are direct payments to landlords who have chosen to invest in properties that cater to people whose rent is paid by the taxpayers of the United States?…this practice was started in some ways to improve the living conditions of the people who would have otherwise been trapped in the cycle of dependency that government projects?…some landlords who enrich themselves by “fleecing the taxpayers by appearing to help the helpless” do as bad of a job at tenant management as Uncle Sam does?…it is not unusual for such investment groups to buy a building on credit, milk the Section 8 vouchers for a few years, and let the bank take the building back?…this happens all of the country?IS IT TRUE when urban renewal envelopes a property that has been taken by a bank, another set of investors will often come in and convert the former Section 8 properties to market rate properties and make a killing?…such place often then notify the long term residents that they have a short time to be gone and follow up by renting to urban professionals or professional school students like medical students as the case may be?…renting to medical students even if there are just a few of them is a much more profitable operation than just cashing Section 8 vouchers?…keep your eyes open because such and activity may happen at a complex near you?IS IT TRUE  at Wednesday “Mayors Traveling City Hall” .Mayor Winnecke looked totally surprised when some in attendance verbally insulted him?  …its looks like Mayor Winnecke political honeymoon with the common folk of the 4th Ward is over with?IS IT TRUE that some of residents of the 4th Ward also made insulting remarks towards City Council President Missy Mosby and At-Large Councilman Jonathan Weaver at Wednesdays “Mayors Traveling City Hall” meeting? … Mosby and Weaver response to the insulting remarks were to quickly leave the meeting without comment?  …they couldn’t take the political heat so they quickly got out of the kitchen?IS IT TRUE we totally agree that the new owners of Lincoln Estates should evict trouble makers, drug dealers and deadbeats living at Lincoln Estates apartment complex?   … the decision of giving Lincoln Estates residents letters of tenancy for terminations without warning could cause problems for the unemployed, elderly people who have serious health issues, the working poor and disabled people living there?Todays “Readers Poll” question is: Do you feel that the City should help the displaced residents of Lincoln Estate? FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Guide to Ocean City Air Show 2015

first_imgBOARDWALK AEROBATIC AIR SHOW The free Ocean City Aerobatic Air Show is scheduled for 1 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 13, over the beach and boardwalk between Sixth and 14th streets in Ocean City, NJ.When: Starting at 1 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 13Where: Stunt planes fly over the ocean with the routines best viewed from the beach or boardwalk between Sixth and 14th streets.What: Thrill to the skills of the best stunt pilots in the world. Featuring the Redline 2-ship, RV8, Red Star and Dragon, Warbird Flights, USCG Search and Rescue Demonstration and lots more.Cost: FreeSponsors: This event is sponsored by the Ocean City Tourism Development and Ocean City Hospitality Associations. Show coordination and operation provided by David Shultz Air Shows, LLC.Wristband Discounts: Pick up a free wristband at the Saturday Air Festival to receive discounts at stores and restaurants throughout Ocean City for the entire weekend. Participating stores will display a sign in the window. Wristbands also will be available at the Welcome Center on the Route 52 causeway, the Welcome Center at 34th Street and the Welcome Center at City Hall (ground floor at Ninth Street and Asbury Avenue). Ocean City’s popular air show flies at 1 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 13. Here’s what you need to know.last_img read more

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Swift choice for Wholebake

first_imgVegeterian food manufacturer Wholebake faced a challenge when it needed to handle multi-packed products, including flapjacks and high-energy bars, in a new packaging format.The company’s mix of automated and traditional bakery means that production capability can range from short runs to 40,000 bars a day, and it therefore required a flexible machine that could also cope with high volume.So it turned to Leeds-based PFM Packaging Machinery to find a solution for this latest dilemma. PFM recommended its Swift flowrapper and this has now been installed at the Wholebake site, based in Corwen, North Wales.FAST MOVERThis latest piece of equipment can operate at up to 100 products per minute and has allowed the company to bring the new multi-packed packaging, previously contracted out, in-house. The move has allowed Wholebake to upgrade its packaging and has resulted in substantial savings in labour costs, says PFM. As well as operating at high speed, the Swift flowrapper also provides ease of use with accuracy and reliability, claims the firm.Wholebake, initially formed in 1984 in a small farmhouse kitchen, now employs 25 staff and operates from a 15,000sq ft factory with two production lines. Previous purchases from PFM comprised a PFM 50 flowrapper, supplied and installed in April 1989, and a PFM Hurricane flowrapper, installed in March 1997.VEGETARIAN DEMANDWholebake’s products are approved by both the Organic Food Federation and the Vegetarian Society and are available in retail stores nationwide including one of the UK’s leading supermarkets. The company prides itself on installing the best possible technology to handle the ever-increasing demand for healthy vegetarian meals and snacks.Founder and director Steve Jones says: “I would certainly recommend PFM. We have again received very good service, with a cost-effective solution that perfectly suited our flowrapping needs.”Responding, PFM’s sales and operations director, Chris Bolton says: “The flowrapper purchased by Wholebake is an extremely versatile, compact and reliable machine, capable of running at a higher speed than many of its market rivals, so it was the perfect choice to meet the company’s requirements.”The Swift flowrapper is just one of a range of over 40 machines from PFM including multihead weighers, horizontal and vertical form fill and seal packaging machines. nlast_img read more

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Marcus King Jams With Eric Krasno And Marco Benevento In Charleston [Gallery/Videos]

first_imgFortunately, photographer Ellison White was on hand to capture this great show! Check out the photos below. Last week, Eric Krasno and Marco Benevento joined forces for a double billed run of shows in the Southeast. The two stars ended their run at the Pour House in Charleston, SC on October 22nd, where they had the pleasure of welcoming guitarist Marcus King during the performance. As if Krasno and Benevento weren’t enough to bring out the music loving fans, King has become a rising star and amassed a loyal following as well in the Southeast. This meeting of the minds was surely a remarkable way to spend a Saturday evening.Krasno and King put down a great version of “Them Changes,” and King also sat in for an extended period during Benevento’s set. You can watch videos of Benevento with Marcus King below, courtesy of yuforic. Load remaining imageslast_img read more

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Water, life, and climate change in South Asia

first_img Strengthening Harvard’s ties to South Asia The monsoon is often referred to as India’s “finance minister,” writes author Sunil Amrith, because the economy of South Asia is so deeply tied to the amount of rainfall the monsoon brings each year — filling aquifers, irrigating agriculture, and driving hydroelectricity. But climate change is threatening to shift its patterns, making it more erratic, with the potential to destabilize livelihoods throughout the region. In fact India just had its driest June in five years due to a delay in monsoon rains, according to government data. But in parts of the country recent heavy rains have brought deadly floods.In his latest book, “Unruly Waters: How Rains, Rivers, Coasts, and Seas Have Shaped Asia’s History,” Amrith, the Mehra Family Professor of South Asian Studies and chair of the Department of South Asian Studies, traces the intricate role water plays in the interconnected economic and social structures of South Asia and tells the stories of people and institutions that have undertaken massive efforts to harness water and control its distribution.Q&ASunil AmrithGAZETTE: How would you describe the summer [or southwest] monsoon to someone who has never experienced it?AMRITH: It feels like the world is dissolving. Both the intensity and the pervasiveness of water during those months of the year are what characterize them. And if you’re in a big city like Mumbai, you are certainly in this “floating city” to some extent.I think one of the defining features of the monsoon climate is its period of waiting, which is culturally very resonant in South Asia. Going back to the great Indian epic poems, you have this account of waiting for the rains to come, and of course they come after the heat has built and built and built through April and May. The phrase often used is “the burst of the monsoon.”GAZETTE: It’s fascinating to realize that all the rivers that course through South Asia originate in the Himalayas. What is the relationship between the mountains and the monsoon in terms of supplying water to the region?,AMRITH: They are such an integrated system. The Himalayan rivers are year-round rivers because they are supplied and fed both by rainwater and by snowmelt from the mountains. But they vastly increase their volume during the monsoon season from April to September, so it really is a sort of feedback loop between the meltwater of the Himalayas and the rains. The Himalayas also act as a barrier to the southwest winds, concentrating most of the rainfall on the Indian Gangetic Plain.Increased snowmelt and the recession of glaciers have major implications. A recent study shows that the rate of snowmelt is even worse than we feared. And so it’s precisely the interaction between seasonal rainfall, the enormity of the Himalayas — which have such an effect on the world’s climate that they have been called the “third pole” — and the sheer number of people who depend on these waters that positions South Asia at the front line of climate change. The fact that so many of these rivers cross national borders complicates all of this.GAZETTE: Which parts of the monsoon system are thought to be affected by climate change?AMRITH: All of it. For example, if the oceans are warming faster than the land, which many studies have shown to be true, that actually narrows some of the thermal contrast needed to drive the monsoon system. This may be one reason why the monsoon system has not behaved as many models would predict that it should, with many studies suggesting a diminution rather than an increase in mean annual rainfall, despite surface warming.GAZETTE: Although you are not a scientist, you’ve had to become a student of climate science in order to write this book. Based on your understanding, to what extent is there scientific certainty that the monsoon is changing?AMRITH: Based on my reading of the climate science, and my discussions with scientists, there’s reasonable confidence that the monsoon is changing, but huge uncertainty about exactly how and exactly why and on what timescale. I think the overall patterns around which there is something of a consensus is that there’s been a rise in extremes.What rainfall there is tends to be more concentrated in periods of very intense precipitation. An important study suggests that there’s been a decline in average rainfall of about 7 percent since the 1950s, though some suggest this has reversed over the past few years. What is clearer is that the monsoon has been more prone to extremes of wet and dry.GAZETTE: In order to redirect water from the rivers, India and other countries in South Asia went through a period of dam building in the 1950s and 1960s. Subsequently, India went through an extensive period of well digging to access groundwater in the 1970s, which led to the so-called Green Revolution. Which of these two approaches had the most impact?,AMRITH: Dam building did not play a major role in the Green Revolution. It was mostly driven by access to groundwater [digging wells, pumping water out of the ground].I think we can accept two things about the Green Revolution as both being true. One is that it saw absolutely astonishing gains in food production. So, for the first time in the 1970s, India became self-sufficient in food, which it hadn’t been since the late 19th century — if not before that. China too saw enormous increases in agricultural production without any expansion of the amount of land given over to agriculture.And, alongside this, I think we need to acknowledge two negative effects of the Green Revolution. One was dramatic deepening of rural inequalities, so that the gap between those farmers who benefited from the Green Revolution and those who did not grew ever sharper in India. The poorest farmers today in India are those who still have access to no irrigation whatsoever. So, there’s the inequality question, but there’s also the sustainability question. Regions of India that most benefited from the Green Revolution — the northwest, Punjab, parts of western India, parts of southeastern India — have water tables that are critically depleted today. So, it is not clear whether that model of agricultural expansion is inherently sustainable.GAZETTE: Do people in India today have to pay for water?AMRITH: Some do and some don’t, and that’s part of the question of inequality. Groundwater is essentially a free resource for those who own the land and who have the technology to drill — and there are many who argue that that shouldn’t be the case because, in a sense, groundwater is a public good, a public good that is captured as a sort of private gain for those who own land. On the other hand, many of the poorest people in India do have to pay for their water, particularly those who live in underprivileged urban neighborhoods. They pay the so-called “tanker mafia” for access to water. So, the questions are: Who pays for water and who pays for electricity? One of the stories behind India’s so-called groundwater revolution is that large farmers have enjoyed heavily subsidized energy, which they used to power the pumps that dig wells. That has had perverse effects in terms of inequality.GAZETTE: What are examples of “downstream” consequences in the accessing and controlling of water? “South Asia is interesting for one simple reason: This is an example of a large and complex society that has always lived with and has devised many distinctive ways of managing climatic uncertainty, long before anthropogenic climate change.” Lakshmi Mittal family gift expands opportunities for regional engagement Related Student-run nonprofit at Kennedy School wins innovation competition A lifeline to India’s farmers on the edge of despair AMRITH: In many ways the control of water was part of the post-independence project of democratization in India. The idea was that harnessing water would liberate Indian farmers from being prisoners of the monsoon, and that they would be able to access irrigation water year-round.Things didn’t turn out that way, and I think one of the tragedies of the story is that those large dam projects ended up deepening inequalities. If you think of the vast numbers of people displaced by these large dam projects in India — that’s not random. It has tended to be people from marginalized Adivasi communities who lose their land, because it is taken over by the giant reservoirs that dams create. They are not compensated; they are uprooted from their lives and their livelihoods because they are denied the political power to negotiate with the state. Some of the largest social and political movements in Indian history in the late 20th century have had to do with large dams and mobilizing against some of their effects.GAZETTE: Thinking about our current global climate crisis, what lessons can we draw from South Asia’s experience that might suggest a way forward?AMRITH: South Asia is interesting for one simple reason: This is an example of a large and complex society that has always lived with and has devised many distinctive ways of managing climatic uncertainty, long before anthropogenic climate change.More immediately, progress made in South Asia has always been as a result of political pressure and mobilization. One of the features of the history of South Asia since the 1970s and 1980s is its powerful environment movement — one that has been an inspiration to movements in other places and which might continue to be so. By no means have they always been successful — probably more often than not they haven’t.Finally, the history of water in South Asia adds weight to the many voices in the debate about global climate change saying to us that we really have to think more about inequality. Yes, climate change is a shared problem on a planetary scale. But it affects some people much more profoundly than others, and some people have many more resources to deal with or mitigate it than others do. That, for me, is the biggest lesson that comes out of my book and my work on South Asia. We need to put inequality at the heart of the story when we are thinking about climate and climate change. The other lesson, and the note on which I end “Unruly Waters,” is a conviction that the sharing and harnessing of water never has been, and never could be, purely a technical question. It is a political, moral, and economic issue. There is no quick solution to these problems, and yet we remain addicted to technological fixes.This story has been edited for clarity and length. To read the full story, visit the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs.last_img read more

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Asia Today: S. Korea steps up virus prevention for holiday

first_imgSEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korean officials are taking steps to limit travel and gatherings during next week’s Lunar New Year’s holidays as they fight a steady rise in coronavirus transmissions. More thermal cameras will be added, train operators will be allowed to sell only window seats and passenger vessels are being restricted to half capacity. Travelers must wear masks at all times, and eating at highway rest areas will be prohibited. A Health Ministry official announced the plans on Wednesday while repeating a plea for people to stay home. Lunar New Year is celebrated around Asia and a popular time for people to visit their relatives. China also has tried to discourage travel during the holiday to avoid the risk of viral outbreaks.last_img

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Eat more chicken

first_imgThe poultry industry in Georgia has grown steadily since the 1940s. Like all of agriculture, poultry has had its share of ups and downs. Right now, it’s facing a perfect storm created by high corn prices, escalated fuel prices and a down economy. Georgia produces 1.4 billion birds and 3 billion eggs annually, giving poultry an economic impact of more than $13 billion a year on the state of Georgia. The industry also accounts for more than 100,000 jobs. “If Georgia were a country, we’d be the fifth largest producer in the world,” said Mike Lacy, University of Georgia poultry scientist and head of the poultry science department in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Most of the cost of producing poultry meat and eggs is in the feed. In July 2010, corn cost about $3.50 per bushel. By June 2011, corn had jumped to $8 a bushel. Fuel costs have increased almost as fast as feed prices. And a tough economy worldwide has kept demand for meat and eggs at a lower level than experts predicted. As a result, poultry producers have not been able to raise prices sufficiently to balance out higher feed and fuel prices. To bring supply and demand into balance, producers are reducing flock sizes. Small flock sizes will help them be more profitable, Lacy said.Despite the downsides, the future of the poultry production in Georgia is bright, Lacy told a group of Georgia Farm Bureau members assembled in Athens, Ga., for their annual commodity meeting. Demand for poultry meat and eggs will increase as the world’s population grows and the economies of developing countries inevitably improve. “Being in Athens gives our experts [at Georgia Farm Bureau] insight into the research taking place at UGA, and they have the opportunity to talk about policy issues in the industry,” said Zippy Duvall, Georgia Farm Bureau president. “It also gives researchers the opportunity to hear from producers and learn what issues they have, as well as making connections at UGA that can benefit them on their farms.” Duvall is a poultry farmer in Greensboro. Despite the uncertainty of the industry, he is rebuilding and remodeling his entire poultry operation. “My comfort comes from being a grower for one of the most profitable plants in the state,” Duvall said. Duvall attributed some of the decreased demand for Georgia poultry products to trade policy. “We’ve been left out of the world marketplace, and we need to support bilateral trade,” he said. For poultry to grow, Lacy said that Georgians would have to continue to invest in research and technology. Current UGA poultry research projects include searching for alternative feed ingredients for poultry diets, identifying genes in chickens that allow more efficient use of feed, increasing egg production in broiler/breeder flocks and attempting to skew sex ratios to favor male or female offspring.last_img read more

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