Chilean Naval Elements Support USNS Comfort Mission

first_imgBy Felipe Lagos/Diálogo January 08, 2019 Three units of the Chilean Navy joined the hospital ship USNS Comfort’s crew to support U.S. Southern Command-sponsored humanitarian mission Enduring Promise 2018. The Chilean military came aboard the medical campaign on the second half of the boat’s trip in Latin America. The three units of the Chilean Navy, Lieutenant Commander Jaime Gaete, Lieutenant Valentina Martínez, and Petty Officer Second Class Juan Pinilla, boarded the ship on November 16. The service members, who carried out duties as technical physicians and provided dental services, stayed on board until December, when the ship returned to its home port in Norfolk, Virginia. Through the participation of its units, the Chilean Navy sought to learn about long-range missions and exchange knowledge. The support of the Chilean institution also served to demonstrate the friendship between the partner nations. “We are cooperating with the U.S. Navy to the best of our ability,” Lt. Cmdr. Gaete told Diálogo. “The idea is to learn from them about logistics and organization, but also to contribute with what we know and have learned during this time. We know the pillars of the [Chilean] Navy’s Health Directorate, and our idea is to work accordingly, to the best of our ability.” Relieving pressure Between October and December 2018, the USNS Comfort conducted an 11-week humanitarian mission in Central and South America, providing medical care on board and in medical sites on the ground. The mission helped relieve pressure on national medical systems, caused partly by the increase in Venezuelan migrants escaping from the situation in their country. The crew of more than 900 medical personnel, including U.S. and partner nation military service members and nongovernmental volunteers, examined thousands of patients in Ecuador, Peru, Colombia, and Honduras. Chilean health personnel joined the mission in the port of Turbo, Colombia, after accepting a formal invitation from the U.S. Embassy in Chile. “We got to work with an organized ship that cooperates with several countries, where everything has gone smoothly,” said Lt. Cmdr. Gaete. “Given its size, the ship can’t reach any port, and disembarkation is done entirely by helicopter or boat,” the officer added, highlighting the operation’s efficiency. Providing assistance During more than a month on board, the Chilean officers helped people in Turbo and Riohacha, Colombia, as well as in Trujillo, Honduras, with dental care as part of the 15-member dental team. For his part, Petty Officer 2nd Class Pinilla worked as a transfusion specialist at the blood bank. “What surprised me the most during this mission is the number of patients who live in remote areas and don’t have access to health services,” Sgt. Pinilla said. “[I’m also surprised] to see the indigenous populations that don’t get assistance because they can’t communicate due to their language, and the support the [Colombian] government has offered by being present in these vulnerable areas and providing support with all the necessary resources.” Lt. Cmdr. Gaete explained that many dental cases were basic, including cleaning and tooth extraction. However, some patients needed more urgent assistance. “[There were] many reconstructive procedures, many children, and a few cases of tongue cancer, which had to be referred to the ship to remove the tumors,” the officer said. “In general, people are grateful. We try to relieve pain as much as we can, and, most importantly, to eliminate infections. […] Seeing people so grateful, who understand what we are doing, is very rewarding.” According to the Chilean officers Colombia’s stops stood out, as the service members were able to observe the differences between the patients of each region. “It’s been very different,” Lt. Cmdr. Gaete said. “Turbo is a town with a lot of low-income Colombian people, and Riohacha is a town one hour away from the border with Venezuela. It consists of a very vulnerable Venezuelan population, many of them helpless and without access to health care.” The experience was rewarding, and the navy service members feel lucky to have been a part of the humanitarian mission. For Lt. Cmdr. Gaete, the privilege was doubled, as the officer participated in the mission of the USNS Mercy in Asia and the Pacific in April 2018. “Personally, it’s been a unique experience, since I was able to increase my knowledge professionally, getting to know other cultures, assisting on the ground with the different health conditions in each town we went to,” Petty Officer 2nd Class Pinilla said. “As a member of the Chilean Navy, it’s been a great experience. The love and affection of the people we helped will without a doubt be one of my best memories from this mission for the rest of my life.”last_img read more

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Syracuse holds Boston College to 13 1st-half points in 76-50 win

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on January 15, 2020 at 8:30 pm Contact Nick: [email protected] | @nick_a_alvarez The Syracuse locker room buzzed postgame. Juli Boeheim filtered through and chatted with players. They didn’t sulk in lockers, as they had the previous two home losses — both less than five points. Smiles flashed. Elijah Hughes joked with a reporter after Hughes spilled M&M’s on the floor.SU paired a dominant first half against Boston College with a competent second. “Our confidence is higher. We’re feeling good,” Hughes said after picking chocolate from the carpet.On Wednesday night in the Carrier Dome, Syracuse (10-7, 3-3 Atlantic Coast) eviscerated Boston College (9-8, 3-3), 76-50. The Orange took care of a bad Eagles team and did it quickly. BC missed its first 18 3s. SU posted above-averages in paint production (36 points), fast-break points (24) and bench scoring (11). Top-scorer Buddy Boeheim (22 points) outscored Boston College’s first-half total (13). And a 23-5 run over seven minutes in the first half removed all doubt. Four nights after its biggest win of the year, SU completed its easiest.“We got our position and as the half went on they got some shots but they couldn’t make any,” head coach Jim Boeheim said. “We were able to get our offense going and I think that was the difference.”Despite regaining leading-scorer Derryck Thornton (13.3 points), the Eagles didn’t record a field goal in the first eight minutes, only tallying a free throw. Their movement was scarce, and the zone pressed higher. The 2-3 worked to perfection, suffocating a bad offensive team and forcing them into deep 3-pointers. BC’s only open look in the first five minutes was when SU crashed on a driver and he kicked it out. Even then, the shot clock expired.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textIn their last 11 games in the Dome, BC averaged seven 3s a game, posting a 35% shooting percentage. They finished six-for-30 on Wednesday.There were a few early sequences when BC cracked the zone, but a misfired pass or early dribble pick-up wasted chances. Boston College, a year removed from Ky Bowman scoring 21 against SU, lacked any playmaker to break down the zone, let alone shoot out of it. Steffon Mitchell’s first bucket came from a jumper on the elbow, but BC was constantly denied the ball in the high post. Constant traps on the wing opposite the Orange bench helped force 11 turnovers.  Howard Washington said a pregame scouting report compiled by associate head coach Adrian Autry showcased how BC liked to work inside-out. By cutting off the high post, the Eagles were hapless.“We knew all their sets,” Washington said. “We basically knew who they were going to go to.… We worked on their offense for two days and it paid off tonight.”Even with Hughes missing a chunk of the first half after injuring his midsection when driving and falling, Buddy and Joe Girard III combined for 16 of SU’s first 18 points. BC switched on most defensive possessions, but the Orange rarely turned inside in the half court. Instead, SU posted 24 fast-break points, a reprieve from earlier transition issues in conference play.Buddy scored seven-straight in the first half, his last two makes coming on lay-ins over smaller defenders. Syracuse had a height-advantage with BC center Nik Popovic’s back injury sidelined, and it exploited that in the fast break where Boston College wasn’t able to find assignments.When Hughes returned, scoring all of his points post-injury, the deficit ballooned. He received an outlet pass, nearly tripped over himself and converted a floater. After a turnover by Mitchell near half court, Hughes threw down a one-handed dunk for a 20-point lead. Meanwhile, Mitchell stumbled over himself getting up and slipped back to the hardwood.By halftime, a 38-13 in SU’s favor, the Eagles had more turnovers (seven) than field goals (five). The margin would hover around 25 points in the second half.“We forced them off the line a bit, we moved,” Washington said. “We were on every rotation.”SU kept attacking inside and filled the highlight reel. A one-handed alley-oop from Hughes to Quincy Guerrier. A drop-step block by Marek Dolezaj. All kept the crowd engaged for a while. But in the final four minutes, they filed out in masses.NCAA Tournament hopes weren’t boosted by the Orange beating an Eagles team ranked in the bottom-third of the country in nearly every offensive category. Instead, they were inched forward. But for one night, SU could deploy the walk-ons and watch as it climbed into the top-half of the conference standings.“It was a combination of us playing good and them missing in the first half,” Boeheim said. “… First half is obviously an aberration, but we’re happy to get that.” Commentslast_img read more

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