A complicated problem, made worse by politics

first_imgTo some, it seems obvious that migrants are human beings forced to move, rather than amorphous threats against the state. But little about human beings is simple. On Friday, at the inaugural Mahindra Humanities Center conference on “Migration and the Humanities,” a panel of academics tackled different facets of the many population movements now crisscrossing the globe.And no surprise: The experts raised more questions than answers as they discussed a complicated problem worsened by adversarial administrations, here and abroad, and the untold suffering of millions.Before the final talk, on “Survival and Security,” Mahindra Center Director Homi Bhabha said the conference had two goals: The first was to focus on “the ways in which the humanities contribute to the centuries-long process of migration,” he said; the second, “How do the issues that are raised by migration — questions of justice, of citizenship, issues of security, of social and global equity — speak to the foundational paradigms of the humanities?” Junot Díaz gets personal — and political — at Harvard conference Related Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist brings multiple identities to ‘Migration and the Humanities’ John Hamilton, Harvard’s William R. Kenan Professor of German and Comparative Literature and chair of the department of Germanic Languages and Literature, said any discussion of survival and security brings up “modalities of living in the face of civil unrest and oppression, climate change and cultural displacement.”“The humanities are well-suited to posing key questions,” Hamilton said. For example: “What is the promise, and what are the limits of living securely? How might security circumvent new, unforeseen threats? How can we be carefree without being careless?”Inderpal Grewal, professor and chair of women’s, gender, and sexuality studies at Yale, put the focus on the concept of the state, and specifically nation-building. In Grewal’s home region of the Punjab, gender roles and the idea of a “militarized masculinity” have shifted, casting Sikh men first as the ultimate defenders and ideal police, and then, too often, as dangerous insurgents. Even more problematically, Grewal said that some Sikh men are still set up as defenders of a united India at the same time the prime minister is promoting Hindu nationalism.,In the Punjab, a region divided by Pakistan and India, and for the Sikhs, a religious minority, these issues are not new.“What is new,” Grewal said, “is that migrants are securitized.”Lisa Lowe, Distinguished Professor of English and Humanities and director of the Center for the Humanities at Tufts University, addressed the way current trends of migration are being framed as crises, a tactic that serves to detach the mass movements from their longstanding political roots.“We are living in a time of unprecedented migration from countries besieged by war, poverty, and unprecedented coups,” she said. Lowe said The New York Times last week put the number of forcibly displaced at approximately 64 million — “the highest number since World War II.”However, unlike that post-WWII migration, “contemporary migrants are largely from the global south,” Lowe said. She said most are “food refugees, climate refugees, and asylum seekers,” who seek entrance to — and are viewed as a threat by — the north, which parlays their numbers into a rationale for becoming “Fortress Europe.”Most migrants are people in crisis, and a refusal to face the underlying causes of their displacement — war, economic inequity, or climate change — compounds the issues they face, she said.“The migrant is viewed as stateless, homeless, and rights-less,” Lowe said. “Perhaps the migrant is a sign of our difficulty in reading the global present.”“Migration and the Humanities” was sponsored by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.last_img read more

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Bachelorette Tayshia Adams’ Divorce, Ex-Husband: Everything She’s Said

first_imgBourelle filed for divorce from Adams in October 2017, kess than two years after their February 2016 wedding. The roofer cited irreconcilable differences. In their divorce documents, Bourelle claimed that the pair had been “living separate lives” since August 21, 2017.“The date of separation is 1 year and 6 months from the date of their marriage,” the docs state. “They are now agreed and intend to live apart permanently.”After a stint on Underwood’s season, Adams went on to appear on season 6 of Bachelor in Paradise. While she had connections with Derek Peth and John Paul Jones, Adams was single by October 2019 when she and Jones called it quits for good. In August 2020, news broke that Adams was taking over for Clare Crawley on season 16 of The Bachelorette because the hairstylist fell in love with Dale Moss within the first two weeks of filming.- Advertisement – “It’s not hard at all [to talk about the divorce on The Bachelorette] because it’s definitely something that I’ve experienced in the past and it led me to today,” she told Us Weekly ahead of her November 2020 debut on the series. “But I don’t want it to define me because it doesn’t define me. It’s just something that I grew from and I learned from.”Adams added that her past relationship affected her journey as the Bachelorette.- Advertisement – – Advertisement – “Having been married before, I feel like … I’m not just going to do anything just to do something. I’m not going to do it because I feel like I need to or do this and that. I’m going to do it because it’s the right thing to do, and I’m excited and happy,” she told Us at the time. “If it were to happen, it’d be with the right sentiment.”Scroll through for more on Adams’ divorce: Before Bachelor Nation met Tayshia Adams, she was married to her college sweetheart, Josh Bourelle.“I actually married my first boyfriend, and I was with him for about six years or so. I guess I could, kind of, sense we weren’t doing very well,” Adams told Colton Underwood on season 23 of The Bachelor, which aired in 2019. “And I think that’s why I fought so hard just to try to do as much as I possibly could [to save the marriage].”- Advertisement –last_img read more

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BLOG: Governor Wolf Pledges State Support to Revitalize Johnstown

first_img By: Megan Healey, Deputy Press Secretary SHARE Email Facebook Twitter BLOG: Governor Wolf Pledges State Support to Revitalize Johnstown Jobs That Pay,  The Blog Governor Wolf traveled to Johnstown Friday to announce the creation of over 130 new jobs, as well as a multi-million dollar state investment to help revitalize the city. The governor, speaking at a ribbon-cutting for LifePoint Health Business Services, said this will spur economic development and job growth in the entire area.LifePoint — in exchange for a pledge to create 132 new jobs over the next three years — received a funding proposal from the Governor’s Action Team (GAT), which is an experienced group of economic development professionals who report directly to the governor and work with businesses that are considering locating or expanding in Pennsylvania. LifePoint’s GAT offer includes:$500,000 Pennsylvania First Program grant$112,200 in WEDnetPA funding for employee trainingGovernor Wolf also announced more than $15 million in additional state investments through the Department of Community and Economic Development, the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, and the Department of Transportation, to align with the region’s Vision 2025, a framework for revitalizing greater Johnstown.“While it’s important to highlight investments being made and jobs being created by the private sector, it’s also important to build strong, stable communities to support business growth,” Gov. Wolf said. “I look forward to continuing to visit Johnstown and receiving updates on the momentum of Vision 2025.”center_img Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf January 22, 2016last_img read more

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