Donald Trumps kakistocracy is not the first but its revived an old

first_img Share on Facebook Donald Trump That doesn’t make sense and you’ve contradicted yourself. Were you just trying to sound clever? André Spicer Share | Pick Report Hades59 17 18 Facebook 22 23 18 Apr 2018 17:39 Twitter 18 Apr 2018 17:07 Share on Twitter 18 19 The first recorded use of kakistocracy was in a sermon, delivered in 1644 by Paul Gosnold. His audience was the “King’s parliament” assembled in Oxford during the English civil war to support the monarchist cause. Gosnold warned of the dire consequences if “our well-temperd Monarchy” descended “into a mad kinde of Kakistocracy”. The term lay fallow for nearly 200 years, until it was revived by the 19th-century English satirist Thomas Love Peacock. In The Misfortunes of Elfin, he mocks the “agrestic kakistocracy” of his time, which treated “treading on old foot-paths, picking up dead wood, and moving on the face of the earth within sound of the whirr of a partridge” as “heinous sins”.The word soon found fertile soil in the United States, where in 1838, William Harper, a US senator and defender of slavery, claimed that anarchy was a kind of kakistocracy. Decades later, in 1876, the American poet James Russell Lowell asked: “Is ours a ‘government of the people by the people for the people,’ or a Kakistocracy rather, for the benefit of knaves at the cost of fools?”The term was not just limited to the US. In an account of his travels to Australia, the English writer John Martineau, describes the remarkably poor quality of government there. In the 1869 publication Letters from Australia, he documents the poor quality civil service, the self-serving politicians and the remarkably coarse political debate. He wonders whether these new colonies would become a kakistocracy. Reason (optional) Report Pinterest Twitter Early users of the term often counterpose it against aristocracy. For them, aristocracy was government by the most excellent in skills, knowledge and virtue. In contrast, kakistocracy was government by the unskilled, unknowledgeable and unvirtuous. The word was often used to castigate some of the less savoury forces unleashed by the rise of democracy. It helped to describe the anxieties about the disorder created when “the worst” took over. Often the word was all about preserving the privileges of those assumed to be “the best” (upper-class white men). But behind it was that old conservative idea that democratic revolutions don’t necessarily unleash the best in human nature, they can also unleash the worst.The term reappeared in the 20th century, but with a different meaning. Instead of being a term used by conservatives to describe disorder, it began to be used to signify corruption. In 1944, Time magazine described the corrupt regime run by the New Jersey Democratic party boss, Frank Hague. The magazine hoped that the introduction of voting machines had “struck a blow at the very vitals of the kakistocracy” run by Hague. It resurfaced again during the Reagan years, and was then used by rightwing commentators such as Glenn Beck to attack the Obama presidency. The term has also been used to described the toxic mix of organised crime, self-interested oligarchs and a dysfunctional state in Russia during the Yeltsin era.But it has been the election of Donald Trump to the US presidency that has driven a wider revival of use of the word. On the eve of Trump’s inauguration, the economist Paul Krugman warned: “What we’re looking at, all too obviously, is an American kakistocracy.” Six months into the presidency, the political scientist Norm Ornstein documented how constant waves of scandals around the White House led him to conclude that “kakistocracy is back, and we are experiencing it firsthand in America”.Brennan is the only the most recent in a long line of people to dust off the term to describe what he sees as a incompetent and unethical regime. During its 450-year history, kakistocracy has mainly been used by conservatives to convey their anxieties about what happens when tradition and order are upended. Today, it is being claimed by people from across the political spectrum to describe the wicked disorder that can result when expertise and ethical judgment are aggressively and systematically pushed aside.• André Spicer is professor of organisational behaviour at the Cass Business School at City, University of London. He is the author of the book Business Bullshit Since you’re here… Share on Facebook A historically apt word to describe a modern inept presidency. | Pick Donald Trump | Pick Facebook US politics 2 3 1 2 | Pick Twitter …and UK Brexit government | Pick Facebook 19 Apr 2018 1:36 Share on Twitter Kakitechnology? 18 Apr 2018 17:10 Share Trumbledon Share Trump administration Facebook Show 1 more reply Share on Twitter Show 4 more replies 100 All Opinion Foothillsflavour Facebook Report Kakis is a fruit! 18 Apr 2018 16:54 Share on Twitter 1 2 unthreaded | Pick Reply Facebook Share Report 2 3 50 Share on Facebook 18 Apr 2018 16:45 18 Apr 2018 19:56 NotIdefix 2 3 Facebook Laurence Bury 18 Apr 2018 16:47 18 Apr 2018 16:47 Share And I was so sure it was derived from the English, “cack”. 18 Apr 2018 18:01 Facebook Facebook Share on Facebook Today, it is being claimed by people from across the political spectrum to describe the wicked disorder that can result when expertise and ethical judgment are aggressively and systematically pushed aside. 18 Apr 2018 16:54 Share on Twitter Share Show 1 more reply Share on Twitter | Pick Reply Facebook Share Facebook Share on Facebook | Pick Report Reply Reply Reply 0 1 Twitter Share TheGribbler Share Facebook Report Arron Banks is a minor player in the insurance business who funded a rival political party and a rival pro-Brexit campaign to the one that some tories, but not Theresa May, supported. It’s a ridiculous stretch to say that he controls either the country or the prime minister. Share on Twitter Facebook Share on Facebook Share on Twitter When John Brennan used a 17th-century word to describe the US presidency, Twitter went wild – but what does it mean? Share goodtable phillipmallett Share on Facebook 18 Apr 2018 16:54 Twitter | Pick Michael_GPF comebackcpscott 3 Reply | Pick Share American economy booming, record jobs created and peace talks with North Korea on the way – not a Clinton neocon war aristocracy then, but a dynasty lies ahead to lead American democracy into brave new worlds. After a Westworld, a Trumpworld. Reply goodtable 2 3 Share on Twitter 2 1 2 Report Quixotematic Share 5 Bellendocrocy Quixotematic 18 Apr 2018 17:16 Share on Twitter 5 1 2 Reply Report Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Report Share on Twitter Reply Share on Twitter Reply Reply Share on Facebook 18 Apr 2018 17:01 Report And the word perfectly describes the Trump administration: Education: DuVos, a home schooling nut who believes everything a child needs to know is in the bible. Environment: Pruitt, a climate change denier who believes in the God-given right of American industry to pollute as much as it wants so long as it makes more money. State: Bolton, a rabid warmonger who’s just itching for a war with someone, Iran, North Korea, Russia, any or all. And so on, not forgetting Trump, a narcissist man-baby who lashes out at anyone and everyone, just the worse possible person to put in charge on 5000 nuclear weapons. Reply expanded Donald Trump’s ‘kakistocracy’ is not the first, but it’s revived an old word Facebook Shares284284 | Pick Email (optional) Share on Twitter Many have also been brought up to think themselves superior to the public and born to rule. The UK has a very toxic mix of nasty, greedy spivs, expensively educated dullards and a large minority of voters ready and willing to tug their forelock. 18 Apr 2018 17:14 Share on Facebook | Pick Share on Twitter Hearthammer1 Yup, we’re being ‘led’ by the Dunning-Kruger brigade: Facebook Share on WhatsApp Share on Facebook | Pick Share on Facebook Reply Show 1 more reply 18 Apr 2018 16:56 12 13 Why? Kakistocracy is not defined as you not liking a politician. Hades59 Report Share on Twitter unclestinky Twitter Twitter Share on Facebook Report I think you will find that Kaki is the tree and Kakis are the fruit! Fred Bloggs Report Quixotematic Share Facebook Report 9 10 Twitter Facebook Share Share on Facebook Reply 3 Fred Bloggs Reply | Pick 3 4 Twitter Reply Share Hades59 Twitter Share on Twitter Twitter 8 9 ‘The term kakistocracy has also been used to described the toxic mix of organised crime, self-interested oligarchs and a dysfunctional state in Russia during the Yeltsin era.’ Photograph: Mikhail Metzel/AP Share | Pick Twitter Report aningeniousname Share on Twitter 18 Apr 2018 22:30 Foothillsflavour Share Share on Facebook Twitter 4 5 Share on Twitter Twitter 4 5 | Pick 18 Apr 2018 17:56 Comments 269 Read more Share 1 2 Reuse this content,View all comments > Other way round, cack is apparently from Latin cacare and Greek κακκη (kakkh), to have a shit (or the shit thus produced). | Pick Report ‘It has been the election of Donald Trump to the US presidency that has driven a wider revival of use of the word kakistocracy.’Photograph: Carlos Barria/Reuters Twitter Share on Facebook Michael_GPF Share on Facebook nonanon1 Share on Twitter 3 4 Reply 18 Apr 2018 17:27 TheGribbler Reply Share on Facebook Arne Beswick Share on LinkedIn 13 14 Share on Facebook | Pick | Pick Share on Facebook 4 5 Quixotematic Reply Reply Twitter Dowling1981 Report 1 The entire world appears to be a kakistocracy. Where have all the politicians with vision and humanity gone? Twitter Share … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Share via Email guardaelhilo 18 Apr 2018 16:55 Report Reply Share on Twitter | Pick TheJoyOfEssex Facebook Share Kakistocracy is not defined as you not liking a politician. Reply 18 Apr 2018 17:30 Because the majority of the surviving “Fourth Estate” in the UK has been captured by the same forces which have captured the majority of our political parties. Hence, little scrutiny of government actions and a barrage of contempt and outrage directed at Mr Corbyn and his supporters, or anyone who dares to challenge the status quo. A very familiar story around the world these days. The amazing thing is that those same forces have convinced a huge section of the populace that the problem is “liberal elites” or “useful Marxist fools” whilst themselves disempowering and impoverishing those same people. Dystopian? Orwell couldn’t make it up. Share on Twitter Please select Personal abuse Off topic Legal issue Trolling Hate speech Offensive/Threatening language Copyright Spam Other Report Report 18 Apr 2018 16:57 Twitter Twitter Share Reply Share on Facebook Facebook 18 Apr 2018 16:44 Share on Facebook | Pick Share on Facebook Facebook Report collapsed | Pick UnrepentantPunk Twitter Share on Facebook Share Twitter DrDeYoung 7 8 petey23 Reply Twitter 18 Apr 2018 17:09 Report Report Reply Twitter | Pick Kaki are fruit. Twitter Facebook | Pick 18 Apr 2018 17:56 18 Apr 2018 20:01 Shoomer Report Facebook ‘Slime ball’: Trump attacks Comey after new book likens president to mafia boss Report Reply 21 22 Share on Facebook Report 18 Apr 2018 17:28 Share on Facebook Report Topics Twitter Facebook Share on Facebook | Pick 18 Apr 2018 17:01 Facebook Reply Twitter Share Share on Twitter Reply Share Facebook Report William Anthony Report Share on Facebook Share Share on Twitter Reply 0 1 Quixotematic Share on Twitter Share Show 5 more replies SterlingPound Reply Twitter Share on Facebook 18 Apr 2018 17:08 6 7 TROOCOST Facebook Twitter This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. Facebook 12 13 Share Share Dowling1981 HiFiAlan Facebook | Pick Twitter | Pick Report Twitter 3 4 Threads collapsed 4 5 Hades59 4 5 The US government is almost completely controlled by corporations (fascism) and this is why the quality is so poor. If the US ever moves away from fascism, expect the quality to improve. Share on Twitter Facebook Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Reply Share on Twitter Facebook Twitter 18 Apr 2018 17:08 comment Share on Twitter | Pick Twitter 18 Apr 2018 16:38 Facebook Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Rarely does an ancient Greek portmanteau word spark a Twitterstorm. But that’s what happened when the former director of the CIA John Brennan took to Twitter and accused Donald Trump of running a “kakistocracy”. This tweet sparked a 13,700% increase in people looking up the word using the online version of the Merriam Webster dictionary. These curious souls would have found a terse definition: “Government by the worst people.” Facebook david brown Share on Facebook Share on Twitter That democracy has sinister and cunning enemies does not invalidate it Reply Facebook TheGribbler Facebook 5 6 Facebook Excellent Point, well made. Share mikedow | Pick Twitter Facebook 5 6 Hearthammer1 | Pick Opinion Report Hearthammer1 Share on Twitter Vox291 Share on Facebook 1 2 Twitter Share on Twitter | Pick Report Report | Pick Laurence Bury 21 22 | Pick Too true. Speaking as a recently naturalised Brit, it’s hard for me to believe that such a high number of people seem to be that way, still. drragon 18 Apr 2018 17:10 Reply Report That would indeed be appropriate when the term is used for the current US regime! Share on Twitter Share on Facebook 18 Apr 2018 16:51 Share on Facebook Reply 18 Apr 2018 18:03 chezeone ‘fucwitanagemot’ Facebook 1 2 Share Facebook Facebook Share on Twitter | Pick Facebook Report Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Report Personally I prefer ‘a fuckwittery’ Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Facebook GuardIAm Reply Share Support The Guardian Share on Facebook comments (269)Sign in or create your Guardian account to join the discussion. Lagado | Pick And it’s a happy accident that the beginning of the prefix also has the association with shit because it’s certainly a right load of kak in charge. “He was perfectly astonished with the historical account gave him of our affairs during the last century; protesting “it was only a heap of conspiracies, rebellions, murders, massacres, revolutions, banishments, the very worst effects that avarice, faction, hypocrisy, perfidiousness, cruelty, rage, madness, hatred, envy, lust, malice, and ambition, could produce.” “My little friend Grildrig, you have made a most admirable panegyric upon your country; you have clearly proved, that ignorance, idleness, and vice, are the proper ingredients for qualifying a legislator; that laws are best explained, interpreted, and applied, by those whose interest and abilities lie in perverting, confounding, and eluding them. I observe among you some lines of an institution, which, in its original, might have been tolerable, but these half erased, and the rest wholly blurred and blotted by corruptions. It does not appear, from all you have said, how any one perfection is required toward the procurement of any one station among you; much less, that men are ennobled on account of their virtue; that priests are advanced for their piety or learning; soldiers, for their conduct or valour; judges, for their integrity; senators, for the love of their country; or counsellors for their wisdom. As for yourself,” continued the king, “who have spent the greatest part of your life in travelling, I am well disposed to hope you may hitherto have escaped many vices of your country. But by what I have gathered from your own relation, and the answers I have with much pains wrung and extorted from you, I cannot but conclude the bulk of your natives to be the most pernicious race of little odious vermin that nature ever suffered to crawl upon the surface of the earth.” Jonathan Swift – Gulliver’s Travels 1726. Facebook Reply Report Facebook Share on Twitter UnrepentantPunk 4 goodtable 18 Apr 2018 17:25 Report 7 8 Report Share 3 4 Share on Facebook 6 7 Twitter goodtable 18 Apr 2018 17:05 Report AnInconvenientTruth Facebook TheJoyOfEssex Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Sounds like a very apt description of what has happened in the UK. Messrs “Had Enough of Experts” Gove & Johnson. Missr “give [rape victims] an opportunity” McVee and Missr “I’ll bomb who I like when I like” May. Expertise and ethical judgement aggressively and systematically being pushed aside. 18 Apr 2018 17:09 Share Report Reply Share on Twitter 18 Apr 2018 18:50 Facebook Report Reply Facebook Reply ThamesSider Add to that list : Ms May : It wasn’t me !! blame Amber Rudd she’s in charge of the home office now! What a hypocrite Theresa May is, why do people not see through her? Report Twitter Share on Twitter I’d love to hear Trump try and pronounce. Dimwit man-baby. Facebook Twitter Report Wed 18 Apr 2018 04.32 EDT nodemocracyhere Hearthammer1 The Greek word for poo is kaka, which has its origins in the Greek adjective kakos, which means ‘bad’. Share on Facebook Share on Twitter 19 Apr 2018 18:12 Share Twitter Twitter Reply Reply Dowling1981 Report 6 7 wherein people of low ability suffer from illusory superiority, mistakenly assessing their cognitive ability as greater than it is. Twitter 6 7 Facebook Reply Share 4 unclestinky Twitter 3 4 2 3 nodemocracyhere There is an interesting contrast between May and Trump. Both are shit, but in slightly different senses. May is shit because she’s a grey obedient front woman for the oligarchs who control this country, people like Murdoch and Aaron Banks. Trump, by contrast, is one of the oligarchs that control America but one who has rather stupidly allowed himself to be put in the full glare of public scrutiny. He would have been much better off getting his own Theresa May to front for him. Share on Twitter Twitter | Pick I’d love to hear Trump try and pronounce it. Dimwit man-baby. Reply Share Share on Twitter Share on Twitter | Pick Reply | Pick 18 Apr 2018 17:25 | Pick Dowling1981 Report aningeniousname don’t know why that posted twice Reply Share The election of drumpf, orban and erdogan is a strong case against democracy Share on Messenger Share on Twitter Facebook Report Silgen 1 2 Don’t know why it was posted once! ecoeschatologist 18 Apr 2018 17:12 Share on Facebook DrDeYoung Share 4 5 Facebook And, of course, poppycock is an English rendering of ‘pappekak’ – Dutch for ‘soft shit’. Share on Twitter Report SillyRestrictions Share on Facebook UnrepentantPunk I think it’s trite but it is the original family name that his grandfather anglisised to make it less German. Like the Windsors did. Report Reply | Pick 18 Apr 2018 17:02 Twitter | Pick we get the politicians we deserve so where have all the good voters gone? Twitter | Pick Share Language adapts 18 Apr 2018 16:45 Share 18 Apr 2018 17:01 It would aptly describe the governments of the UK over the last 40 years.We’re being led over the cliff edge by the least amongst us. Expensively educated fools who only do what’s best for them and their pockets. 18 Apr 2018 16:57 Share on Pinterest comebackcpscott Facebook Reply | Pick Facebook | Pick 18 Apr 2018 17:27 | Pick Share on Twitter Well we have a kakistocracy in the UK too. May, Johnson, Fox, Davis. It doesn’t get much worse than that. But it doesn’t matter to the people who really run the country. We’re an oligarchy controlled a by a few press barons and a few secretive billionaires. they’re not looking for honesty or talent in their cabinet. In fact, it could be a disadvantage because what they want is unquestioning obedience and May’s cabinet gives them that. In return the press barons protect the cabinet ministers from genuine public scrutiny. Whenever they fuck up or lie it is quickly hushed up. And by contrast, opposition leaders have their whole lives analysed in forensic detail and then any weaknesses found are ruthlessly exploited to destroy them. That’s what they’ve been doing to Corbyn. We know almost everything he may ever have done wrong and it has been ruthlessly exploited. By contrast, we know almost nothing about May’s private life and her endless mistakes and half-truths are almost ignored. We’re not a democracy any more. Report Twitter Share on Facebook Where have all the politicians with vision and humanity gone? Shoomer Twitter | Pick Report Where have all the politicians with vision and humanity gone? They are not allowed. You want jobs with fat salaries, get ‘on message’ or forget it, they don not allow people with vision to speak on tv/radio/newspapers anymore, as you probably noticed. MSM is nothing more than a deception tool that has been allowed to go on for too long. I prefer Share on Facebook | Pick Share Reply 18 Apr 2018 17:05 Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Twitter notlobdivad | Pick Report 0 1 Share 18 Apr 2018 17:27 Facebook I’d hardly call naming the IRA and hezbollah amongst your friends as anything to do with his private life. They were political statements made in a time when he never thought he’d be at all relevant in national politics and they’ve come back to bite him on his smug arse. May isn’t perfect. But Corbyn isn’t any better. Stop pretending he is. DrDeYoung AnInconvenientTruth AnInconvenientTruth Facebook Reply Report 2 3 Share on Twitter Michael_GPF Report Share on Facebook Twitter Twitter Share Twitter Kakis is a fruit! Share on Twitter Twitter 18 Apr 2018 17:10 0 1 18 Apr 2018 17:06 Reply Share on Twitter Report Twitter Caganer-In-Chief Report Show 25 Facebook 25 Share on Twitter 42 43 2 Share on Twitter Show 5 more replies This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. nodemocracyhere 18 Apr 2018 17:05 | Pick Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share Share recommendations Reply UnrepentantPunk Reply Report Share Laurence Bury Twitter 0 1 Arne Beswick If Clinton had won she may have done things that you didn’t like, but at least they would have been bad things done sensibly. The idea behind kakitocracy is gross incompetence, which Trump has in spades. Something he shares with Treeza. 18 Apr 2018 17:30 Facebook Share | Pick Share Share on Twitter | Pick Twitter Facebook comebackcpscott 18 Apr 2018 17:30 18 Apr 2018 18:16 Twitter | Pick Using the word kakistocracy to describe one government or administration rather misunderstands the meaning of the word. What it actually describes is a system of government which ensures that the governors are of the worst type possible. Given the shower of shit on both benches of the House of Commons it may well be equally or better applied to the UK at this point. Facebook 18 Apr 2018 17:05 Facebook notlobdivad Fred Bloggs | Pick Report We’re being led over the cliff edge by the least amongst us. nodemocracyhere Share 19 20 2 3 Share on Twitter Share kaknoun (S. African taboo)1. faeces, shit (taboo slang), excrement, stool, muck, manure, dung, droppings, waste matter His shoes were covered in kak.2. rubbish, nonsense, garbage (informal), balls (taboo slang), bull (slang), rot, crap (taboo slang), bullshit (taboo slang), bollocks (Brit. taboo slang), cobblers (Brit. taboo slang), drivel, tripe (informal), claptrap (informal), poppycock (informal), pants, shit (taboo slang) Now you’re just talking kak.Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Twitter 1 2 Lagado | Pick Share on Facebook 3 4 drragon newest 18 Apr 2018 17:00 Foothillsflavour Twitter Foothillsflavour Fred Bloggs | Pick 14 15 Share on Facebook 18 Apr 2018 17:17 DJT1Million Share on Facebook Shitocracy. Report Share This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. Share on Twitter Which is extremely worrying. He is unhinged and will cause WW3 then all your happiness will disappear! | Pick Dowling1981 Twitter Share on Twitter ThamesSider Share on Facebook Order by oldest | Pick Share on Twitter 4 5 Facebook Reply Share on Twitter Share 18 Apr 2018 16:48 oldest Share on Facebook chezeone Reply | Pick Share 18 Apr 2018 17:07 Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Close report comment form Share on Twitter Share Share on Twitter 10 11 Share Share on Facebook Twitter Share on Facebook I don’t generally like neologisms, but I suppose that after 450 years this isn’t exactly that and, of course, a neologism that’s actually needed (describes something new) is always warranted. But my own modest contribution, pace what I’ve just said, would be the term ubocracy – rule in the manner of Ubu (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ubu_Roi). Then again, perhaps we should be careful here. Mocking the leader is, or can be seen as, tantamount to mocking the followers and many who voted in a certain way in the US recently undoubtedly did so because they felt they had been too much mocked already. Share on Twitter Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Facebook 18 Apr 2018 18:01 Share on Twitter Debt piling up for the future, inequality increasing, environment being depleted where not destroyed, notions of public integrity undermined … Yup: Trumpworld. Report Share on Twitter Share on Facebook 16 17 | Pick Mocking the leader is, or can be seen as, tantamount to mocking the followers Who deserve it, too. Because the leader wouldn’t be where he is without them. | Pick hubbahubba Share on Facebook Share Oooh, retro! I like it. herditbefore Twitter Facebook Twitter Share Facebook DrDeYoung Share on Facebook Reply notlobdivad 18 Apr 2018 17:52 Share 18 Apr 2018 17:13 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Report Share on Facebook 18 Apr 2018 17:07 Share via Email What a brilliant word! It beautifully describes our political establishment in both the UK & USA to a proverbial ‘t’. Kakistocracy…..love it. Has it ever been anything else? Reply Share on Facebook Facebook Report But ‘worst’, in politics, is a value judgement or ‘party question’ as Russell would put it.I would, therefore, argue that ‘ not liking a politician’ is as valid a basis for the term as any other. DrDeYoung Fred Bloggs Viking71 2 3 NotIdefix TROOCOST 16 17 Were there any politicians with vision and humanity.Then politicians need something else ability to deliver, all 3 things needed for good government.Thatcher had vision (hers) and ability to deliver but not an ounce of humanity.Brown had vision and humanity but not the ability to deliver.Farage has vision (his) but no humanity and needs others to deliver. 3 4 Report Twitter 18 Apr 2018 17:31 Show 2 more replies Politics past 18 Apr 2018 17:09 Language Share on Twitter 18 Apr 2018 17:09 2 3 Reply Share Share I understand your point, but I prefer the ‘hate the sin, love the sinner’ approach. And what I was saying was that certain people (the very terms commonly used to describe them: white trash, hillbillies, red necks [though an article in this paper recently tried to reclaim that as a radical identity], residents of the fly-over states, bible or rush belters and so on, are revealing) were widely mocked before the election in the DC Beltway area, the coastal cities and so on. Roughly, that mockery is part of why some (many?) of them voted as they did. If, for example, all you know, or think you know (I mean a hypothetical person, not necessarily you personally), of Appalachia is cousin marriage, moonshine, blood feuds and the like, then you really don’t know that region. I have great admiration for the film Deliverance and its director (I even have a slight connection to him of the friend-of-a-friend variety) and t’s a film that deserves to be taken seriously (as does the actually rather superior Southern Comfort, a retelling of the Anabasis which stands in the same relation to Cajun culture as Deliverance does to Appalachian). It shouldn’t be read simplistically, but, truth to tell, by many people not from that region it often has been. The original Beverly Hillbillies were affectionately portrayed, the idea of bringing that programme back, in name at least, as ‘reality TV’ for the purpose of mocking comic grotesques is well known. 18 Apr 2018 17:07 | Pick Share 18 Apr 2018 17:05 JonPurrtree drragon | Pick Report I never get why people want to call Trump “Drumpf”. Is it a kind of Xenophobic “forriners have funny names and can’t be trusted” sort of thing? And anyway, “Trump, king of kak” is much more fun. | Pick Reply DrDeYoung 2 3 Laurence Bury Excellent quote, thank you (I especially appreciate the very end). | Pick Yes I know that. I was making the point that all perceived forms of good governance/rule doesn’t exist, then or now. Share on Twitter 24 25 Reply Twitter Reply Report petey23 Share Share on Twitter Share I prefer ‘fucwitanagemot’. 36 37 Reply Share on Twitter goodtable Twitter For them, aristocracy was government by the most excellent in skills. It is invalid to use Kakistocracy in any proper modern context when the antonym is so misplaced. Report Reply Share Dowling1981 4 5 | Pick Share on Twitter Sign in or create your Guardian account to recommend a comment Report 6 7 | Pick 18 Apr 2018 19:21 Reply 18 Apr 2018 17:00 Reply Share Facebook mikedow Share on Twitter Twitter Report Facebook hubbahubba | Pick 1 2 That was my first thought at the origin, yes. Reply Share Facebook Reply Twitter We’re not a democracy any more. Were we ever, except in a limited way? The mask has slipped. We can now see how it is managed. We need to get rid of FPTP, have a written, modern constitution with PR, equality of devolution based on equal-sized units, get rid of all hereditary and religious privilege… Facebook Facebook 17 18 hubbahubba Reply Facebook Padraig The US would have ended up a Kakistocracy no matter which way the election went. 4 5 Show 3 more replies 18 Apr 2018 17:12 Trumbledon Show 5 more replies Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Share Reply Facebook Dickend-sian Share “Kakistos is Greek, it means the worst of the worst. It’s also the name of a vampire so old his hands and feet are cloven.” ―Rupert Giles 18 Apr 2018 17:08 Reply Report Twitter chezeone AnInconvenientTruth | Pick 1 Small-handed Orange Hair-dyer Share Last modified on Thu 5 Jul 2018 16.45 EDT Twitter Sorry there was an error. Please try again later. 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