BLOG: Governor Wolf Pledges State Support to Revitalize Johnstown

first_img By: Megan Healey, Deputy Press Secretary SHARE Email Facebook Twitter BLOG: Governor Wolf Pledges State Support to Revitalize Johnstown Jobs That Pay,  The Blog Governor Wolf traveled to Johnstown Friday to announce the creation of over 130 new jobs, as well as a multi-million dollar state investment to help revitalize the city. The governor, speaking at a ribbon-cutting for LifePoint Health Business Services, said this will spur economic development and job growth in the entire area.LifePoint — in exchange for a pledge to create 132 new jobs over the next three years — received a funding proposal from the Governor’s Action Team (GAT), which is an experienced group of economic development professionals who report directly to the governor and work with businesses that are considering locating or expanding in Pennsylvania. LifePoint’s GAT offer includes:$500,000 Pennsylvania First Program grant$112,200 in WEDnetPA funding for employee trainingGovernor Wolf also announced more than $15 million in additional state investments through the Department of Community and Economic Development, the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, and the Department of Transportation, to align with the region’s Vision 2025, a framework for revitalizing greater Johnstown.“While it’s important to highlight investments being made and jobs being created by the private sector, it’s also important to build strong, stable communities to support business growth,” Gov. Wolf said. “I look forward to continuing to visit Johnstown and receiving updates on the momentum of Vision 2025.”center_img Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf January 22, 2016last_img read more

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Roos Weers executes 2 penalty corner goals en route to hat trick

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ The ball rolled in off the penalty corner directly to Serra Degnan, who, hunched over, quickly tapped a pass to Lies Lagerweij.Lagerweij, seeing no angle for a shot, reversed the ball to Roos Weers. Weers squared up a one-timer and sent the ball flying past the sliding goalie to give Syracuse a 3-0 lead.Just after the ball clanked off the inside of the goal, Lagerweij sprinted to Weers, low-fived and bumped her in celebration.“(Weers) executed on corners today,” head coach Ange Bradley said. “She played really solid. Her dad’s in town for the weekend, so I believe that’s some inspiration.”Weers’ father, who traveled from the Netherlands, saw his daughter score her second goal and an eventual hat trick. Though the Orange offense started slowly — the team led 1-0 at half— Weers and the defense solved Boston University’s counterattack at halftime, which led to the Orange generating more penalty corners in the game (eight) than the BU had total shots (seven). Weers led the attacking defense of No. 2 Syracuse (9-0, 3-0 Atlantic Coast) with seven total points in its 5-1 victory over No. 17 Boston University (6-3, 2-0 Patriot) Sunday at J.S. Coyne Stadium.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“We practiced yesterday on execution,” Weers said of the penalty corners. “Today the finishing was great.”On the Orange’s seventh penalty corner, a shot by Lagerweij caromed off a Terrier defender in front and squirted out to the top left of the circle. Weers was standing in the right place. By the time Weers shot hit the back wall of the goal, Terrier goalie Cammy Jensen had her arms extended, looking for an answer that didn’t come.Weers and the defense figured out that the best way to combat Boston’s drop-back defense was to run the offense up the sidelines as opposed to in the middle of the field. Often, one of the main defenders — Weers, Lagerweij or Zoe Wilson — would “push up” and join the attack to create more offensive opportunity.“It can be frustrating and boring (to just play the sides),” Lagerweij said. “But that’s what (Boston) wants. That’s why it was important to reverse the ball. Eventually they got tired and big balls opened up.”Three minutes prior to Weers’ goal off the deflection, she took the ball off a reversal and pushed up the left sideline.“I saw space and I saw Emma (Russell) running so I played it there,” Weers said. “And then the goal was even better.”Russell’s shot deflected off the top bar and down into the goal.The pass by Weers skidded past three Boston defenders in the area, but found Russell’s stick. It was on theme for the style that Weers played all day. Twice in the first half Weers played long balls which hit the back of the goal, but didn’t count because Weers had shot them inside the circle.“When I play the (long ball), we always try to get a deflection for the forwards, but obviously it’s great (if they draw a penalty corner too),” Weers said. “We want a goal, it doesn’t matter.”About a dozen times Sunday, Weers received a pass from a back line teammate and sent a long ball. Sometimes the ball rolled through and out of bounds, other times an opponent intercepted it. But on occasion, long balls resulted in an Orange scoring opportunity or Russell standing on the endline, playing in a penalty corner.“(Weers) has played really well the past few weeks,” Lagerweij said. “She’s…scoring goals. It’s fun.” Comments Published on September 27, 2015 at 6:25 pm Contact Sam: [email protected] | @Sam4TRlast_img read more

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Nicaragua prohibits entry of Costa Rican officials to disputed border area

first_imgImmigration officials from Nicaragua on Tuesday prevented a group of Costa Rican inspectors from assessing environmental damage at Isla Portillos caused by the excavation of two artificial canals, said Environment Vice Minister Ana Lorena Guevara.Experts from the Environment Ministry and the Foreign Ministry arrived at the site for a two-day visit following orders issued by The Hague-based International Court of Justice (ICJ) last month.Costa Rican officials were trying to access Isla Portillos, a small wetland of some 1.2 square miles, that both countries claim as their own before the ICJ.On their arrival, Nicaraguan military told the group that they would only allow them to enter the site as long as they were accompanied by members of the United Nations Wetlands Convention (RAMSAR) or by Nicaraguan environmentalists. The Costa Rican officials gave up and headed back.Guevara explained that the group’s visit was in compliance with an ICJ ruling that ordered Costa Rica to assess environmental damage caused by dredging works performed by Nicaragua to build the canals, as well as “to propose possible mitigation measures, in coordination with RAMSAR experts.” The UN group had previously said they would visit the wetlands in Feb. 2014.In the same ruling, the ICJ ordered Nicaragua the repair the canals and to immediately cease all works in the area.Former guerrilla leader Edén “Comandante Cero” Pastora, in charge of dredging project, commenced repairing the two canals Nov. 28. “We currently are filling the 150 meters canals, which I mostly cleaned of water lilies and other aquatic plants … There are some 50 men in the area with shovels, moving sand and covering the canals,” Pastora said at the time.The Costa Rican mission intended to evaluate whether Nicaragua has complied with the ICJ orders.On Tuesday, the ICJ reported on its website that next Friday the Court’s President, Justice Peter Tomka, will read the ruling on the conflict between the two nations.The ruling will resolve the claim by Nicaragua that the construction of a road parallel to the Río San Juan caused damage to the river, which functions as a natural border between the two countries.Costa Rica sued Nicaragua for several invasions by military and civilian groups of its territory.In addition both countries dispute sovereignty over the wetlands of Isla Portillos, which Nicaragua calls Harbour Head. Facebook Comments No related posts.last_img read more

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