Murty family gift establishes Murty Classical Library of India series

first_imgHarvard University and Harvard University Press (HUP) announced recently that the Murty family of Bangalore, India, has established a new publication series, the Murty Classical Library of India, with a generous gift of $5.2 million. The dual-language series aims both to serve the needs of the general reading public and to enhance scholarship in the field.Harvard Provost Steven E. Hyman noted that the Murty family gift will enable HUP to present the literary cultures of India to a global readership in an unprecedented manner. “The Murty Classical Library of India will make the classical heritage of India accessible worldwide for generations to come,” said Hyman. “We are truly grateful to the Murty family for their vision and leadership in making this historic initiative a reality.”The Murty family’s endowed series will serve to bring the classical literature of India, much of which remains locked in its original language, to a global audience, making many works available for the first time in English and showcasing the contributions of Indian literature to world civilization. Narayana Murty said of the new series, “I am happy that Harvard University Press is anchoring this publishing project.” His wife, Sudha, agreed: “We are happy to participate in this exciting project of bringing the rich literary heritage of India to far corners of the world.”Under the direction of General Editor Sheldon Pollock, William B. Ransford Professor of Sanskrit and Indian Studies at Columbia University, and aided by an international editorial board composed of distinguished scholars, translators will provide contemporary English versions of works originally composed in Bengali, Gujarati, Kannada, Marathi, Persian, Punjabi, Sanskrit, Tamil, Telugu, Urdu, and other Indian languages.Each volume will present the English translation with the original text in the appropriate Indic script on the facing page. The books will be supplemented by scholarly introductions, expert commentary, and textual notes, all with the goal of establishing Murty Classical Library volumes as the most authoritative editions available.The Murty family’s vision has already begun to impress notable scholars, such as Harvard’s Thomas W. Lamont University Professor and Professor of Economics and Philosophy Amartya Sen, who expressed his appreciation for the initiative. “There are few intellectual gaps in the world that are as glaring as the abysmal ignorance of Indian classics in the Western world. It is wonderful that the Murty Classical Library of India is taking up the challenge of filling this gap, through a new commitment of the Harvard University Press, backed by the discerning enthusiasm of the Murty family, and the excellent leadership of Sheldon Pollock — an outstanding Sanskritist and classical scholar. This will be a big contribution to advancing global understanding that is so much needed in the world today.”HUP plans to make the works available in both print and digital formats. The first volumes are scheduled for publication in fall 2013. An Indian edition is being planned.Founded in 1913, Harvard University Press is a major publisher of nonfiction, scholarly, and general interest books with offices in Cambridge (Mass.), New York, and London.last_img read more

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Manuel Pellegrini: Manchester City striker Sergio Aguero among world’s best

first_imgManuel Pellegrini has no doubt Sergio Aguero belongs in the world’s elite player bracket with Cristiano Ronaldo and Lionel Messi. It was a stunning return to form after a mixed start to the season in which the Argentinian had struck just once from open play and been hampered by a knee injury. Asked how the 27-year-old compared to the world’s best, Pellegrini said: “After what we have seen here, of course Kun is at that level. I have already said that after Ronaldo and Messi he is the best player in the world. He always makes important things (contributions) in competitions. “But the important thing is, not only for Kun, but as a team we must continue to improve, to win the Premier League again and to win the Champions League, because Messi and Ronaldo are always involved in that competition and that is very important for a player. “I think that this team is in that way (headed) and I’m very happy for us that in Kun we have a very important player.” Since being signed from Atletico Madrid for £38million in 2011, Aguero has finished as City’s outright top scorer in three out of four seasons. In the other year he shared the accolade with Carlos Tevez. His overall City tally now stands at 115 goals. Many of those goals have come in bursts, with the Argentina forward often suffering lean spells on return from injury. He suffered a setback last month after being hurt in a tackle from Crystal Palace’s Scott Dann but Pellegrini had no doubt the goals would soon return. He said: “Of course, I am always talking to all the players, especially when they are not in their best moments. “But the most encouraging thing for Kun is the way we play. We always play attractive, offensive football. We always put technical players in our starting XI to try to create the space (for him).” But the Manchester City boss accepts his star striker may need to win the Champions League for that view to become widespread. Aguero provided another demonstration of his formidable talents with five goals in a sensational 20-minute spell in Saturday’s 6-1 demolition of Newcastle. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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From the Weeping Woman to the Naked Gringo a guide to Costa

first_imgRelated posts:Tico Times #TBT: The one millionth Tico Throwback Thursday: Roosevelt’s fishing trip to Isla del Coco Throwback Thursday: Bulls from 1981 Throwback Thursday: Making cocktails with Cacique Creepy tales are all a part of folklore.Halloween is not considered a traditional holiday in Costa Rica, but the lore here is rich in scary stories. Although few people truly believe in haunts these days, it never hurts to pay attention. It has been said that these tales are based on incidents that took place in the colonial era, and they are repeated as warnings to follow the straight and narrow. Or else…La SeguaCentral America’s own version of the Sirens. Young men (and perhaps some older ones too) would be riding home on their trusty steed after a late night at the canteen or roadhouse. But then, there along the roadside he comes upon a damsel in distress. And she’s quite fetching. Being a chivalrous fellow, the man helps her climb on the back of the horse and and they start off.Along the way he becomes aware of foul odors and hefty snorting from his passenger. He turns around, and sees that the femme fatal has turned into La Segua, a monster with the head of a putrefied horse.If he doesn’t succumb to a heart attack, he vows to change his flirtatious ways, settle down and marry the plain but respectable girl next door. He also vows to never help a stranger in need again. It’s a somewhat dubious lesson. Although, to be fair, The Tico Times does not condone picking up hitchhikers. “La Segua” A theatrical interpretation of La Segua (Photo Courtesy of Compañía Nacional de Teatro)El CadejoAnother tale from the colonial era, this story is of a defiant young man whose father decides to teach him a lesson. If the young man continued in his life of sin, the father – who was also a wizard, apparently – promised to turn his son into a dog. And not just any canine but a big, black, hairy dog with red eyes and goat feet. So a goat-dog, basically. Which is much worse than a regular dog. The creature also is condemned to dragging a chain behind him (did you know leash laws actually started in the colonial period?). The son ignored his pop’s advice and soon he turned into the devil dog, Cadejo.Many souls swear to have heard Cadejo rattle his chain and growl as they made their way home on rural roads in the dead of night.The Headless PriestGee, life in colonial times must have been wild. There are several versions of headless clerics. Here are some of the most popular versions:One story features a man of the cloth who had his head lopped off over a married lady in his parish. It wasn’t the hand of the Almighty who smote him but the lady’s husband, who ripped the parson’s noggin from his neck. He killed him on the altar just as he was consecrating the host. The headless priest wanders the country looking for his loss cabeza. In Cartago, residents allege this ghost appears in the ruins of the cathedral, which was destroyed by an earthquake, rebuilt and destroyed a second time. A vengeful god seems to shake the earth beneath the church each time it gets rebuilt, and the cathedral remains in ruins to this day.San Ramón has its own version. The priest there loved to gamble and had amassed quite a fortune. He had to make a trip to Nicaragua and secretly buried his hoard under a tree in San Ramón. On his trip, the priest was decapitated. But concerned about his assets, he returned, sans head, to keep an eye on his treasure. To this day he hides in the bushes to see that nobody steals it.In Patarrá, another headless priest hides in the bushes around the church to scare sinners into changing their ways. Because he is hidden in the foliage he is difficult to see, but churchgoers feel his presence. Another tale tells of a priest who was beheaded by the Inquisition for being a skirt chaser and roams the countryside looking for his head. The question is, how many headless priests reside in Costa Rica? That is some powerful Catholic guilt.The Oxen-less CartThis tale too has several versions. Back in 1700s, when San José was just getting settled, it was surrounded by woods. But the trees yielded plenty of timber for the growing town, and part of the woods was reserved for building a church – the most important construction of any community.However, not everybody was satisfied and one man, on the sly, cut and carried off the wood to make himself a new oxcart. It was to be the sturdiest oxcart in town, and everybody was going to be so jealous about this rad new oxcart. He even thought about painting some sick flames on the side of the cart, but before he had a chance Saint Joseph had his vengeance. The patron saint of the city took a tough stand against the wood thieves. As punishment, he forced the thief to roam around the country in his cart until the end of time. The oxen, innocent of any wrongdoing, were released. But the oxen-less cart rumbles along night after night. It is said that the man died years ago but his cadaver remains in the cart. The story concludes with a warning that to look at the cart will result in instant death.Nobody living can claim to have seen the cart without oxen plod by because they were all too afraid to look, but many people claim to have heard it.La LloronaLa Llorona is a weeping woman who wanders along rivers searching for her lost child. There are several versions of this story, but all center around a young woman who, against family wishes and community standards, had a child outside of marriage. In one version she is a young girl from the country who works in a house in San José. There, she is seduced by the owner of the house, who subsequently rejects her when the woman gets knocked up.Ashamed and fearful, she returned home to her parent’s disapproval. On a rainy night she threw the baby into the river. Now and forever, La Llorona walks the shores trying to find her infant and make amends. Her cries of remorse are often heard near rivers.Another version describes her as an Indian maiden who falls in love with a Spanish conquistador. Although they want to get married, her father is against it. But when the maiden gets pregnant, the father throws the baby into a waterfall, where it is carried away. And the tearful Llorona must wander the banks of the country searching for her child.As far as images go, interpretations of La Llorona might be the most frightening. We did a Google image search for you. Click here if you dare.The tale hasn’t been forgotten. In 2019 you can watch the movie “The Curse of La Llorona” and see the legend come to life.Macho ChingoMacho Chingo was either a Gringo or a German who liked to saunter around naked in Atenas due to the heat. (In some versions of the tale he inexplicably wears a necktie.) The word macho is used for blondes with light complexions, while chingo is slang for naked. The foreigner still likes amble through the streets of Atenas in his birthday suit, and there’s even a hill named after the Macho Chingo. But now he’s a ghost. And not just any ghost … a naked ghost.El Puente de PiedraIn Grecia, there is a bridge called Puente de Piedra. Satan constructed this bridge at the behest of a wily Costa Rican who needed to cross the river. The Costa Rican, with no faith in MOPT to get the job done, chose instead to barter his soul if Beezlebub would build a bridge of stone. But the devil had to finish it before the cock crowed at dawn.The devil got busy hauling stones from the river and stacking them to form the bridge, and when he had only one more space to fill, the Tico grabbed a rooster that wandered nearby and squeezed it, making it crow. Thus he cancelled the contract, and outwitted the Dark Lord Satan himself. By looking up at the bridge from down below you can see the space where the last stone should have gone.This story was originally published on Oct. 28, 2013. Facebook Commentslast_img read more

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