People

first_img Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article PeopleOn 17 Sep 2002 in Personnel Today SusanMcNally will leave her post as head of strategic HR at Enfield to join NewhamCouncil early next month. McNally’s job has taken her around the capital’scouncils including Waltham Forest, Southwark and Haringey.Iam a Londoner by adoption and I think it’s a fabulous city,” she says. Herkey responsibilities at Enfield were industrial relations, employee relations,strategic HR, corporate projects and equalities. “I am really lookingforward to my new role at Newham, where I intend to further shape the HRfunction into a key strategic player in what is a very exciting and dynamicauthority,” she says.McNally,who has an MA in strategic HR, hopes to make her new role very businessfocused, delivering results to the function’s customers.”Iwant the HR service to be customer focused and I also want to develop a numberof flagship projects which will champion equalities in the workforce and thecommunity,” she adds.Shesays that good HR should have a positive impact on an organisation and that thesecret to success is highly motivated staff: “What I love most about HR isthe opportunity HR professionals have to inspire and positively create changein organisations at both macro and micro levels. I know that motivated peopleare key to making the greatest difference with our customers both internal andexternal.”McNallyis a fellow of the CIPD, has two children and enjoys travelling. she says:”I am an independent parent with two children so work-life balance is areality for me. I have learned most in my life from being a parent and fromthem both as individuals. CV2002Head of HR, Newham Council1998 Head of strategic HR, Enfield Council1990 HR and training and development manager, Haringey Council1985 Equalities projects manager, Southwark CouncilOnthe moveCrawleyBorough Council has appointed Biggi Manning as its new assistant head of HR.She will play a lead role in developing HR policy with specific responsibilityfor job evaluation, training and the staff nursery. Manning has worked in localgovernment for the last 10 years, including roles at Brighton Council andCrawley hospital. Her major challenge will be to help implement new HR strategyincluding management development, IIP and flexible working.CaronJones is the new HR manager at Wren’s Hotels. Jones has 10 years of domesticand international HR experience within the blue-chip service industry. Shejoins the hotel group from American Golf (UK), where she was a regional HRmanager. She has also held senior positions at major hotel companies includingthe Mandarin Oriental in London and Le Meridien Jumeira beach Hotel in Dubai.AllanDavies has taken up his position as the head of the local authorities unit inthe Heath & Safety Executive. He is a fully qualified environmental healthofficer and has held local government posts in Swansea, Brent and Westminster.He has worked in the private sector for Tesco stores. In his new role, he willwork closely with other organisations and government bodies to represent publichealth concerns and the role of local government. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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DPS to discuss several issues this summer

first_imgCrime in the USC area has been on the decline, but the Department of Public Safety is still hoping to address several key issues and will be discussing possible changes over the summer.DPS Assistant Chief John Thomas said some concerns for the coming year include an increasing number of homeless people around campus and a growing number of inmates who have been released early from jail moving into the area on probation status.DPS will continue to work with the Department of Probation & Parole to monitor early released inmates in the community, Thomas said, and it hopes to address issues of aggressive panhandling and loitering.DPS also plans to expand the use of bike patrols in the campus community, rather than increasing vehicle patrols.Jillian Chou, a senior majoring in international relations, said she appreciates the extra CSC security officers that DPS has provided around campus.“I like that they have security on every corner,” Chou said. “You feel very safe walking; it’s nice knowing they are watching you off campus too.”Thomas said DPS also hopes to take steps to decrease property theft, including encouraging students to take better care of their property and to not leave their belongings unattended.Mallory Jebbia, a sophomore majoring in biochemistry, said she understands why the thefts are frustrating for DPS.“DPS can’t be there to watch our stuff,” Jebbia said. “Students need to be more aware and responsible of their belongings.”The increased number of bicycles on campus is another concern for DPS because of thefts and because bikes can obstruct access to buildings.Additionally, DPS hopes to see a decrease in the number of alcohol overdoses by students and a decrease in the number of physical altercations involving alcohol.DPS has been able to continue the overall reduction of crime on campus through the first quarter of 2010, Thomas said.This year, the USC campus community was designated as a safe community by the World Health Organization.Thomas credited this success to the use of predictive policing as a crime reduction strategy and said he hopes to expand this practice.“[We want to] expand our use of predictive policing and crime forecasting as strategies to combat crime and address quality of life issues,” Thomas wrote in an e-mail.Still, some students like Jake Minkley, a junior majoring in business administration, do not feel campus safety has changed.“I don’t feel like they have reduced crime,” Minkley said. “I go to the [University Village] and I just don’t feel like it’s gotten any better.”But Molly Abrams, an undeclared sophomore, said DPS makes her feel safe.“I never feel unsafe; they’re everywhere,” Abrams said.last_img read more

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