Constantinides picked for Obama’s Mandela Fellowship

first_imgCatherine Constantinides is a former Miss Earth South Africa and Play Your Part Ambassador. (Image: Kevin Mark Pass) Former Miss Earth South Africa and Play Your Part Ambassador Catherine Constantinides’ star keeps shining as she works to make South Africa and the world a better place.No stranger to leadership platforms and thought leadership, Constantinides will be heading to the US as one of the 2016 Mandela Washington Fellows, part of the Department of State’s Young African Leaders Initiative (Yali).Constantinides leaves in June with fellows from across Africa for a six-week leadership training programme. This includes an opportunity to hone their skills at an American higher education institution with support for professional development after they return home.She said that ensuring human rights for all Africans will unlock the continent’s potential. “We must be committed to succeed in ensuring that human rights are an integral part of our fabric with a unified commitment and energy to move Africa forward as an economically stable and viable global competitor.”The FellowsThe Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders began in 2014 as the flagship programme of President Barack Obama’s Yali initiative.Fellows are placed at US colleges and universities where they will focus on developing skills in one of three areas: business and entrepreneurship, civic leadership, or public management.Constantinides has been placed in the civic leadership track and will spend her time in Virginia at the Presidential Precinct.The precinct is made up of six landmark institutions – four of America’s most important historic sites, which includes the Thomas Jefferson Monticello, and two of the country’s most outstanding public universities being the University of Virginia and America’s second-oldest university the College of William and Mary.A social innovatorThe South African government recently awarded Constantinides with the Ubuntu Youth Diplomacy award for her outstanding work across Africa and the world.She started her first business at the age of 16 and has worked as an international climate activist, passionate humanitarian and social entrepreneur.Her work on women empowerment in the environmental space has gone beyond South Africa to reach Zambia, Côte d’Ivoire, Ethiopia and Namibia.Constantinides also is at the helm of the Miss Earth South Africa leadership programme, is co-founder of Generation Earth and is a social cohesion advocate for the Department of Arts and Culture.She is an Archbishop Tutu African Oxford Fellow and has worked tirelessly over the past 18 months on human rights violations in Africa with a firm commitment to bring justice to forgotten people across the continent.In 2015 she was invited as an honorary member of the Golden Key Society and was also nominated as one of South Africa’s 21 Icons, an acclaimed TV and photographic series honouring great South Africans.Follow @ChangeAgentSA on Twitter and Instagram over the next two months as Constantinides shares her wisdom on leadership.last_img read more

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A Canadian Editor Questions Passivhaus Dogma

first_img Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details. Today’s brief blog — a departure from my usual practice of writing in-depth articles — was inspired by a recent editorial by Richard Kadulski, the editor of a Canadian newsletter called Solplan Review.In the March 2014 issue, Kadulski wrote, “I have had discussions with some designers and builders that have set out to build in accordance with Passive House principles. When I questioned them, and suggested alternatives that might be easier to build or be more economic, the answer invariably comes back that it’s not an acceptable Passive House detail.“If Passive House has laid it out, it’s the gospel, and don’t bother with anything else. And don’t bother questioning whatever quirks have been built into the criteria or the software because it cannot be challenged.“Like converts to a new religion, they seem to lose sight that there are many ways of achieving high-performance, sustainable building.“If we’re going to make progress to achieve truly efficient, sustainable and net-zero construction buildings, we need to be able to entertain new ideas and take advantage of new tools and materials. It’s great to get enthusiastic buy-in from new participants who will champion the cause — these are vital to help spread the word. But we need to be careful not create a new religion with a set of dogmas that cannot be challenged.”Any group that sets out to write a standard has to address the inevitable tension between rigor and flexibility. Almost by definition, rigorous standards tend to be inflexible.Some standards are prescriptive standards — that is, they tell builders exactly what they need to do, step by step — while other standards are performance standards — that is, they set goals that builders much achieve without telling them how to get there.The Passivhaus standard is a… Start Free Trial Already a member? Log incenter_img This article is only available to GBA Prime Memberslast_img read more

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The Military Child’s Experience

first_imgDaddy’s Home by Robert Couse-Baker , CC BY 2.0The MFLN Family Development Early Intervention team recently interviewed Christian, the 15 year old son of an Army soldier, for his thoughts on being a military child.  This interview has been edited for length and clarity.What are some of your favorite memories as a military child? Some of my favorite memories are the places I visited when we moved and the people we met. I have been to more countries than most kids will see in their lives. I also have friends living all over the world.What, if anything, has been challenging?One thing that has been challenging is the fact that you have to move frequently. Whenever you move, you have to start all over and make new friends. Another challenging thing is that sometimes I don’t get to see my dad for long periods of time. Sometimes he has been gone for as little as 4 months and sometimes as much as 15 months at a time.Has your parent deployed while you were a child? How frequently?My dad has been deployed seven times. He was sometimes home for just a few months between deployments and sometimes home for a least a year.If so…What did your parent(s) tell you about their deployment? They told me that my dad was going to go away for a long time because of the Army. As I got older I began to understand that he would be far away with limited contact and that he was going to be away for a long time.How far in advance were you informed? I was informed around the same time that my dad found out he was deploying. My parents would tell my sisters and me well before he left.What would you suggest to other parents that need to prepare their children for an impending deployment? I would tell other parents that they should tell their kids about the deployment as soon as they know, and that they should tell them as much about it as their child can handle.How can parents support their children through all phases of a deployment (pre, during, and post)? Before my dad’s deployments he would spend a whole day with us. For example, he and I spent a whole day going to a hockey game. I would also say to parents that they should have a plan to incorporate little things during the deployment. When I was younger my mom and dad made Build-A-Bears for us with a message from my dad that he recorded before the deployment. We always go on family vacations after he gets home.  We went to Hilton Head after a deployment and to the North Carolina mountains after another deployment.  We are able to relax and enjoy time with just the five of us.Have you moved frequently? If so, what strategies do you use to get used to your new “home” and make new friends? What recommendations do you have for adults to help military children through these transitions?I have moved a total of seven times. To help me get used to a new home I always try to meet new neighbors and play outside with them as soon as possible.  I also get involved with sports and try to start team practices and camps soon after we move. This helps because then I have people I know when I start at a new school. One recommendation that I have is be open to meeting new people. Another is that sports can help you adjust to a new location. One of my favorite things to do is to play sports so I meet a lot of friends through the sports I play.What are some of the things your teachers have done for you at school that has helped you adjust/cope with military family life?My teachers have made sure to introduce me to the military family life counselor (MFLC) at our school. They made sure that I knew there was someone I could always talk to if I had concerns about my dad.This post was edited by Robyn DiPietro-Wells & Michaelene Ostrosky, PhD, members of the MFLN FD Early Intervention team, which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, and YouTube.last_img read more

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Bone biopsy

first_imgA bone biopsy is performed by making a small incision into the skin. A biopsy needle retrieves a sample of bone and it is sent for examination. The most common reasons for bone lesion biopsy are to distinguish between benign and malignant bone tumors, and to identify other bone abnormalities. Bone biopsy may also be performed to determine the cause of bone pain and tenderness.Review Date:8/11/2012Reviewed By:Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director and Director of Didactic Curriculum, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington. C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc.last_img read more

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