ECISD students earn National Merit Hispanic Scholar honors

first_img Twitter Twitter Facebook OCA top 2 were ESL students Noel earns award Facebook Fruit Salad to Die ForUpside Down Blueberry Pie CheesecakeTexas Fried ChickenPowered By 10 Sec Croissant Breakfast Sandwich Casserole NextStay National Merit Hispanic Scholars, from left, Kristin Morton, Reana Lopez, and Jacob Menchaca. Previous articleMelton still taking initiativeNext articleLETTER TO THE EDITOR: Attorney vs. Non-Attorney as County Judge admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR By admin – February 11, 2018 National Merit Hispanic Scholars, from left, Kristin Morton, Reana Lopez, and Jacob Menchaca. All four have taken dual credit, Advanced Placement and/or International Baccalaureate courses.Hinojos, 17, plans to attend Texas A&M University to study mechanical engineering.He said he was surprised about receiving the National Merit recognition.“I feel like it was an honor. I wasn’t sure if I was going to get it or not,” Hinojos said.Hinojos is captain of the varsity swim team, OHS band, a member of the National Honor Society, Amnesty USA. In band, he is a percussionist with an emphasis on the keyboard instruments.He also participates in the Odessa Aquatic Center where he has worked as a life guard.Math and physics are his favorite subjects. He said he always had an interest in how things were made.“So when I heard mechanical engineering is where you can design and where you can innovate, I felt like that was where I wanted to be,” Hinojos said.“… They have created everything from the design of a simple potato chip (to) robotics technology. Everyone needs a mechanical engineer,” he added.Hinojos added that he chose Texas A&M because it is one of the best schools for engineering in Texas and one of the top ranked in the nation. “I felt like it was a fitting choice,” Hinojos said.He said his parents are proud of him and have always supported him. Hinojos said he also wants to set a good example for his younger brothers and sisters.His parents, he said, have always encouraged him to broaden his horizons.Hinojos said he took International Baccalaureate courses until the end of his junior year and then he took all Advanced Placement courses. If you score high enough on an AP test, you can earn college credit.“I can tell you it’s a great accomplishment for the young man. We’re very proud of his efforts and being able to get to that level. We’re very fortunate on our campus to have a student that has excelled at that level. And just to be part of that process he obviously has some goals and aspirations that are pretty lofty that I think he will definitely accomplish because it’s pretty amazing what he’s been able to accomplish so far. We’re certainly supporting him in his efforts to get to that level and couldn’t be any prouder of what he’s been able to accomplish so far,” Principal Mauricio Marquez said.Lopez, 18, got into University of Texas at Austin and University of Texas of the Permian Basin, but said she will probably go to UTPB because she got a free ride. She plans to major in biology and ultimately go to medical school to become an obstetrician-gynecologist or an ear, nose and throat doctor.Lopez earned the distinction of AP Scholar for scoring a 3 on the AP World History exam and a 4 on the AP US History and AP English Language exam. She will be inducted into the Permian Academic Hall of Fame for her outstanding score on the SAT of 1280 and ACT score of 30. She is currently ranked No. 13 in her senior class of 789.She is a member of the National Honor Society, Texas Scholars and Students in Philanthropy.Attending Permian has been an educational experience, Lopez said, but she notes that Permian is well known all over for “Mojo” and “Friday Night Lights.”“I’m glad to be a part of that showing the school is more like a regular high school,” Lopez said.Morton plans to attend Texas A&M and study international studies. She said she thinks she wants to go into politics.She will be inducted into the Permian Academic Hall of Fame for her outstanding score on the SAT of 1390 and ACT of 32. She is currently ranked No. 1 in her senior class of 789.Morton is a member of the National Honor Society (President), Students in Philanthropy, Texas Scholars, Business Professionals of America, Student Senate, Odessa Symphony Guild, Senior Board, Congressional Youth Advisory and Council for the 11th District of Texas.She is a member of Crossroads Fellowship Worship Team, Crystal Ball Foundation and has 13 years of classical piano training.Morton said it was always a goal of hers to become a National Merit scholar.“So I’m pretty happy that I did. I took SAT prep a year early to get prepared for it. It was a class here, but … I think I was a sophomore it was all juniors and seniors and I was the youngest one, so I kind of felt weird because I didn’t know anybody in there,” Morton said.She added that she has had “really great teachers” at Permian and has been fortunate to become involved in a lot of things so she didn’t become just a number.Lopez advised younger students talk to their counselors and start keeping track of their GPA early. “Certain classes you have to take pass fail,” she said. “Make sure you know which ones are weighted and which ones aren’t.”She added that students should volunteer.“I did 50-something hours at ORMC (Odessa Regional Medical Center) and I wouldn’t be able to add up how much I did at Odessa Animal Control,” Lopez said.Morton said students should learn what tests and applications can yield scholarship money and prepare for those things.“Start early. Don’t wait until the second semester of your senior year,” she said.Karen Hart, who teaches anatomy and physiology and is the National Honor Society sponsor and AP coordinator, has Morton and Lopez in class.“They’re both real good students. Kristin is No. 1 in her class. Reana is 13, so both of them are good students and hard workers. But it’s not just the academic sides that they work on. They’re also well known in their class and have good personalities,” Hart said.She said she doesn’t have Menchaca in her class, but knows he is a bright young man with a love of music.Menchaca plans to go to Texas A&M and study biomedical sciences to become a veterinarian.He has earned the distinction of AP Scholar with Honor by scoring a 3 on the AP English Language exam and the AP World History exam and a 4 on the AP U.S. History exam and the AP Biology exam.He will be inducted into the Permian Academic Hall of Fame for his outstanding score on the SAT of 1330. He is currently ranked No. 7 in his senior class of 789. He is a member of the National Honor Society, Texas Scholars, Black Cat Jazz Band, Decathlon (Team Captain) and the Mighty MOJO Marching Band (Officer).He said he’s wanted to be a veterinarian since he was in elementary school.“I’ve always liked animals, so that’s really led me to what I want to do,” Menchaca said.At home, he has three dogs and three cats and his family has a ranch in Menard where they have horses, cows and sheep.On getting the National Merit Hispanic Scholar recognition, Menchaca said he was proud of himself and his family was, too.“It’s really going to help me with college because of the scholarship I get from it,” he said.Like his peers, Menchaca said he has enjoyed attending PHS.“It’s probably been the best three years of life so far. I’ve met lots of new friends. Band has really made my three years here memorable,” Menchaca said.He is in National Honor Society, Academic Decathlon and plays trombone in band and symphony and is in the jazz band.Taking AP biology with former Permian teacher Mike Cashin last year got him more interested in science.“I feel like he made the class fun,” Menchaca said. “He made me want to take more science classes. To be a veterinarian, you need to take a lot of science classes. Being able to enjoy science is kind of necessary to be a veterinarian.”He would tell younger students to dream big and chase those dreams. Menchaca said his band director, Jeff Whitaker, told him that and it made him want to dream big and chase those dreams himself.center_img Registration set for engineering camp National Hispanic Recognition ProgramECISDFour Ector County Independent School District high school seniors have been selected as National Merit Hispanic Scholars.They include David Hinojos from Odessa High School and Kristin Morton, Reana Lopez and Jacob Menhaca from Permian High School.Approximately 1.6 million high school students enter the competition by taking the Preliminary SAT (PSAT). Students take the PSAT during their junior year of high school and are recognized in their senior year, information from the district said.Of the approximately 250,000 Hispanic/Latino high school juniors who take the PSAT only about 5,000 — the top 2 percent — are honored as National Hispanic Scholars. Pinterest Pinterest Local NewsEducation ECISD students earn National Merit Hispanic Scholar honors WhatsApp David Hinojos, Odessa High School National merit Hispanic scholar. 1 of 2 WhatsApp Home Local News Education ECISD students earn National Merit Hispanic Scholar honorslast_img read more

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Appalachian Trail Dispatch: Trail Magic

first_imgEditor’s Note: Blue Ridge Outdoors contributor Chris Gallaway is currently thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail. He will be periodically checking in with BRO and sharing the story of his hike. This is his first dispatch from the A.T. Read his first entry from the trail: A Cold Start.There are many hard days on the Appalachian Trail, days that end in a feeling of such thorough exhaustion that you can’t imagine going on and a gnawing hunger so deep you think it will never be vanquished. One of the secrets of the trail, though, is that the bottom-scraping lows make life’s luxuries all the more sweet. It’s wonderful how quickly your spirits can be restored upon arriving at the shelter and laying down your pack. Within moments of putting on warm layers and eating a bite of food the day’s trial is washed away, and it all feels worthwhile.This contrast is made especially vivid when you are blessed with trail magic along the way. Trail magic is the unforeseen help and support provided by others as you make your hike. It can come in the form of a bottle of water offered by a tourist at an overlook, or a back woods-buffet set up by a trail angel who dedicates months of their time to offering support to thru-hikers.My first experience of trail magic came in Tesnatee Gap, Georgia on Valentine’s Day. My hike that day had unexpectedly grown from seven miles to thirteen, and as I came down to the Gap in a chilly afternoon I was faced with a precipitous climb ahead of me and no water left in my reservoir. Enter “Zipper,” a former thru-hiker who just happened to be setting out on a day-hike as I passed through. Knowing the value of trail magic, Zipper launched into action and scrounged through her car to provide me with a few peanut-butter/chocolate Valentine’s candies and a bottle of water. It was just the kick I needed to get me up the next climb and through the final five miles into my shelter at Low Gap. Moments like that make you so grateful for the generosity of strangers and the close community of support that the Appalachian Trail engenders.In my first month on the trail I had so many experiences of trail magic: Gary and Lennie who opened their hostel early so that I could come in from a cold snap and sleep by the wood stove on a twelve-degree night, a man named Mike who talked with me over breakfast at the Bearland Grill in Gatlinburg and then quietly picked up my tab as he left the restaurant, trail angel Apple who magically appeared in a tent at Burningtown Gap, offering donuts, coffee, hot dogs, and conversation to anyone who happened to be passing through in late February. But by far the greatest experience of trail magic for me came on a fifteen mile day when I was hiking from Blue Mountain Shelter to Deep Gap.I had made two long climbs through Unicoi Gap and over Tray Mountain in the morning. In the afternoon the weather alternated between balmy sun and biting wind crashing along the ridge, making it impossible to temperature regulate. At mile seven I felt upbeat and fresh; by mile ten I was whipped and discouraged. Just as the temperature dropped and snow began to fall in the afternoon I came across a hunting dog that had been separated from his pack. He was friendly and began to follow me as I trudged up the trail. The sight of him ambling along ahead of me wagging his tail was welcome distraction—I called him “Gus.” I thought I’d bring him to the shelter with me, help him stay warm through the bitter cold night that was forecast, but I couldn’t help worrying over the fact that I was down to my last dinner and had no surplus food to share.The day’s hike ended with a terrible climb up Kelly Knob: a sharp point going straight up and down as it appeared on the elevation profile of my map. The wind was blowing away all of my resolve and endurance, and the climb seemed to have no end. I’d saved half of my last Snicker’s bar to feed to Gus when we reached the shelter, but I was so hungry that when we reached the top I waited until the dog was not looking and guiltily scarfed my snack. We made the cold descent down the backside of the knob as the afternoon light dwindled—I prayed there would be someone at the shelter who might have extra food for Gus. When we came to the sign pointing us to Deep Gap Shelter there on the post we found a couple of bags zipped tied with a note: “For the Northbound Hiker and Puppy Dog—Woof Woof!” It was a handful of candy (Skittles and Starburst) and a bag of dog treats. That was a sweet moment and the perfect end to a long day. Gus enjoyed his doggie chews almost as much as I savored my candy, and we settled in to the shelter for one of the coldest nights yet on the Appalachian Trail.Click the image to see a larger version and play a slideshow. center_img last_img read more

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Tudor estate with subdivision potential hits the market

first_imgMore from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus14 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market14 hours ago“It was a personal, passionate choice of the owners of the time, who are still the original owners. It’s only ever had the one owner. A relative of theirs had a home built in the same character and style and they loved it,” Mr Troy told The Courier-Mail.The property is so huge that it has subdivision potential for 15 lots — of one acre each.“It’s a beautiful convenient position to the city or a very boutique acreage subdivision development, that certainly has some appeal in a city like Toowoomba.“Certainly for a potential buyer it’s not only the lovely home and lifestyle it offers now, but rarely do you get the additional benefit of the right zoning suitable for rural residential which accommodates a minimum of one acre allotments.” The back of the main house.Mr Troy said the 18.62 hectare site currently had about 15 to 18 acres that were zoned and had topography suitable for subdivision.Any such subdivision would “subject to council approval”, but it was described as having one of the “key requirements for development” — “power and town water are at the property frontage”.The estate currently has two houses on it — the main “classic Tudor” house with features such as leadlight windows and doors, glazed terracotta tile roof with gutterguard installed, sunken family room, and a feature ceiling of high pitched and exposed beams.The second house on the property coming off at348 Boundary Streetwas a three bedroom gable Queenslander with 12 foot high ceilings and a large “sleep out”. The owners loved the Tudor style so much they built one of their own in Toowoomba. The main house has a solar heated pool. Part of the large property is zoned for one acre subdivision lots. The creator of 61 McDougall Street, Cotswold Hills, is looking for expressions of interest over $1.4m.A touch of old England has hit the market within the city limits of one of the biggest regional centres outside Brisbane.A massive 18.62 hectare property has hit the market with an expressions of interest program looking for offers over $1.4million.The property, set on two titles with two homes and two bores, has a large Tudor style house that comes with a large 12m by 15m solar heated pool, a workshop, landscaped gardens and even an integrated watering system for plants.Agent Murray Troy of Elders Real Estate Toowoomba said 61 McDougall Street, Cotswold Hills, was created by the current owners who had a strong passion for the Tudor style. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow much do I need to retire?00:58 FOLLOW SOPHIE FOSTER ON FACEBOOK The second home with the property’s boundary (marked in red) is a Queenslander.last_img read more

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