One man juggling challenge for cancer research

first_img Tagged with: Cancer Research UK fundraising events Melanie May | 13 June 2016 | News Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis6  144 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis6 One man juggling challenge for cancer research  143 total views,  1 views today A UK-born man has set himself the challenge of juggling every day for 365 days to raise $10,000 for Cancer Research UK.Professional juggler James Bustar lives in Australia and started his juggling challenge in September last year after losing multiple family and friends to cancer. He has set up a JustGiving page, and aims to raise $10,000 for Cancer Research UK as well as for Cancer Council NSW.To give his challenge an added twist, James is juggling more than balls. So far he has juggled everything from clocks to socks, to rocks, and green peas. He has also juggled on a pogo stick, a trampoline, and on a BMX, and is inviting the public to challenge him by nominating new objects for him to juggle via his site.Bustar said:“I want to make this a fun series of events to bring some joy to people who don’t normally have something to smile about when they hear the word ‘cancer’. My aim is to generate $10,000 in funding for Cancer Research UK and to raise some awareness along the way.” About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

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The great railroad strike of 1922

first_imgRailroad workers walking off the job in the July 1922 strike. Photo from Labor Herald [Chicago] Aug. 1922.Ninety-one years ago railroad workers employed in shops and roundhouses revolted against a 12 percent wage cut. Nearly 400,000 workers walked off the job on July 1, 1922.President Warren G. Harding and his incredibly corrupt administration smashed the strike. At least 10 workers were killed by the National Guard and private detectives across the country.Attorney General Harry Daugherty got federal Judge James Wilkerson to issue a sweeping injunction against the workers. Union leaders were forbidden from even giving newspaper interviews. Daugherty was later forced to resign because of the Teapot Dome scandal.Safety meant nothing to railroad bosses like Pennsylvania Railroad President Samuel Rea. With skilled machinists striking, 71 percent of locomotives failed monthly inspections from August through September 1922.Instead of negotiating with union workers, Rea hired over 16,000 gunmen to break the strike of nearly 20,000 employees at the company’s shops in Altoona, Pa., the largest in the world.Although the railroad workers were finally defeated, their great struggle forced the capitalist government to pass the 1926 Railroad Labor Act.Scabbing within the labor movementIt wasn’t just the Harding administration that broke the 1922 strike. While workers in the railroad shops went on strike, workers operating the trains — locomotive engineers and firemen, conductors and brakeman — continued to work.Railroad management was able to split the workers. Union misleaders forgot that “an injury to one is an injury to all.” Instead of fighting together against the railroad companies, leaders of the better paid workers in the “operating crafts” ignored the rest of rail labor.Many engineers and conductors wanted to support the workers in the shops. The defeat of the 1922 strike helped lead workers to form industrial unions in the 1930s, instead of being split up into different crafts.The worst scabbing came from racism in the labor movement. Black workers were kept out of railroad unions. Eugene Debs wasn’t able to get the American Railway Union, which led the 1894 Pullman strike, to allow African Americans to join. It wasn’t until 1937 that the Pullman Company signed a contract with the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, led by A. Philip Randolph.According to historian William H. Harris “from 1928 to 1949, not a single black person found employment on a class 1 railroad as fireman, brakeman, trainman, or yardman.” (“The Harder We Run: Black Workers Since the Civil War)Ironically, railroad companies had used enslaved Africans to lay 9,000 miles of track in the South before the Civil War and Black prisoners to build more miles afterwards. One of the prisoners was John Henry, who was worked to death by the Chesapeake and Ohio railroad, now part of CSX.Union busting and lynchingThe 1922 rebellion of railroad workers was the last chapter in a strike wave that followed World War I and the Russian Revolution. In 1919 one out of seven industrial workers in the U.S. went out on strike. Among them were 365,000 steel workers led by future communist leader William Z. Foster. Many of the striking workers were immigrants.Corporations and their government struck back. Most strikes and organizing drives were defeated. The U.S. Supreme Court upheld “yellow dog” contracts that forced workers to agree not to join a union. Supreme Court Chief Justice and former President William Howard Taft threw out a law that limited child labor.Corporations also funded the revival of the Ku Klux Klan, which experienced a rise in membership to more than 3 million during this period. One year before the railroad strike, white racist mobs, led by the KKK, destroyed 35 blocks of a thriving African-American neighborhood of Greenwood in Tulsa, Okla., killing hundreds of people.This wave of racist attacks and lynch mobs fueled the growth of the Universal Negro Improvement Association whose membership also numbered in the millions under the leadership of the Honorable Marcus Garvey.Censoring labor historyDuring the 1920s, U.S. railroads employed more than 2 million workers. Hardly 200,000 workers have railroad jobs today.Job cuts included railroad shops being shutdown from Livingston, Mont., to Paducah, Ky. Only 1,100 railroaders remain in the Altoona shops, now owned by the Norfolk Southern railroad. This outfit is paying jitney drivers just $8 an hour to carry other railroaders to its Croxton, N.J., yard.Norfolk Southern wouldn’t let the Pennsylvania Labor Historical Society place a plaque commemorating the 1922 strike at Altoona’s Juniata Locomotive Shops. The Blair Bedford Central Labor Council accepted it instead. Railroad management claimed the plaque served “no useful purpose.” (Altoona Mirror, June 2010)This is in the tradition of strikebreaker Samuel Rea, who refused to allow a plaque to be posted in New York’s Pennsylvania Station to honor the workers who died building it. It’s unknown how many workers were killed building the station and the tunnels leading to it. (Jill Jonnes, “Conquering Gotham”)Today’s labor movement can turn things around. Workers on the Long Island Railroad may be forced to go on strike in March. If compelled to strike, women and men will stand united on the picket lines, Asian, Black, Latino/a, Native and white.Millies is a member of the American Train Dispatchers Association and Transportation Communications Union.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Muntons gains HGCA funds

first_imgMaltster Muntons has secured £25,000-worth of fun-ding through the Home Grown Cereals Authority’s Enterprise Awards to enable it to export malted wholegrain flakes to the US market.Stowmarket-based Muntons’ export sales manager Clive Bole said: “This is an exciting move for us because, with these wholegrain flakes, we are launching a totally new product into the US bakery market. We are confident that their health benefits will make them a popular choice with the North American consumer.” Meanwhile, chairman of HGCA’s market development committee Julian Gibbons said: “Muntons has identified a gap in the US bakery market for their flakes, and will be ope-ning up new export opportunities as a result.”last_img

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WiFi rolled out across Greggs

first_imgGreggs is to install wireless broadband access across its 1,571 stores across the UK.The roll-out will start this month with 100 shops per week and will be completed by the end of summer, following a deal with provider The Cloud. Graeme Nash, head of customer and marketing at Greggs, the BB75 retailer, said: “We are constantly looking at ways of giving our customers a fantastic experience when shopping at Greggs. We have a number of outlets now with seating and our cafés and new coffee shops, Greggs Moment, are all ideal locations where our customers can benefit from free WiFi.”Vince Russell, managing director at The Cloud, said: “Greggs might not be the kind of brand you immediately associate with WiFi, but this deal shows how mainstream this technology has become.“It’s no longer the preserve of hotels or train stations, where businessmen log on to check their emails, it’s used by all sorts of people for everyday reasons, such as updating their Facebook, Twitter or Foursquare accounts when they’re on the go. It’s undeniable that the smartphone has changed consumer behaviour and now it’s changing the high street too.”It is believed that Greggs hopes customers will use it on their smartphones to pass the time when sitting in the café areas in larger Greggs outlets.last_img read more

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Douglas Urges Congress to ‘Thoroughly’ Investigate Fuel Prices & Take Action

first_imgGov. Douglas Urges Congress to ‘Thoroughly’ InvestigateFuel Prices & Take Action The Vermont Fuel Dealers Association has called onCongress to close the “Enron loophole,” a provision that protectslargely unregulated “dark exchanges” and drives the price of fuelbased on speculation, rather than free market principles of supply and demand.  Montpelier, Vt. – Governor Jim Douglastoday praised the U.S. Congress for holding hearings on skyrocketing oilprices, but urged lawmakers to conduct a “real, thoroughinvestigation.” Governor Douglas on several occasions has urged the U.S. Congress to begina bipartisan investigation of escalating fuel prices.  The Governor and abipartisan group of 21 of his colleagues had called for a similar investigationlast May.  The Governor most recently urged Congress to investigate oil pricesearlier this winter.   “What’s troubling to average Americans is that as theprice of fuel continues to rise, oil companies are making record-settingprofits.  I’m pleased the Congress is finally looking into this issue. It is my hope that they will go beyond hearings and conduct a real, thoroughinvestigation into what exactly is driving price increases and what can be doneto lower them,” Governor Douglas said. ### “High fuel prices hurt low and middle incomeVermonters the most.  And while my administration will continue to hold theline on in-state proposals that would make fuel more expensive, a long-termsolution can only be achieved by the federal government,” GovernorDouglas said.  “Americans deserve honest answers and real solutions tothis recurring and unresolved problem.” Jason GibbsGovernor’sCommunications Director109 State Street ¨ The Pavilion ¨ Montpelier,VT 05609-0101 ¨ www.vermont.gov/governor(link is external)Telephone: 802.828.3333 ¨ Fax: 802.828.3339 ¨ TDD: 802.828.3345 Congress has the authority and the ability toinvestigate fuel costs and enact free market reforms that lower prices, the Governoradded.last_img read more

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Cabinet to Receive Submission for Joint Venture Agreement to Establish Morant Bay Urban Centre

first_imgChairman of the Factories Corporation of Jamaica (FCJ), Lyttleton Shirley says Cabinet is to receive shortly a submission for the Joint Venture Agreement to establish the Morant Bay Urban Centre in St. Thomas.He made the disclosure at a function held at the Morant Villas, in Morant Bay, St. Thomas on June 7.Mr. Shirley informed that the documents are now with the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation, before being placed before the Cabinet.“When that takes pace, it will trigger off all the things that will make this development break ground and in the next two years, see the transformation of Morant Bay,” he said.The Chairman noted that Urban Centre will facilitate entities and amenities providing improved delivery of key public and private sector services.Over 365,000 square feet of space will be available for amusement, a university, skills training, banking, food services, Business Process Outsourcing (BPO), and other businesses.“We will be having at least four fast food companies and one prominent BPO operator wants up to 70,000 square feet of building (space). They envisioned that it will fit well into their development plan, for not only entry level BPO services, but all the other services that the [industry] demands,” he outlined.The proposed $4 billion Morant Bay Urban Centre will be developed just outside the existing town on the 25-acre property where the old Goodyear factory is located.last_img read more

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