McGrath Institute modifies “Saturdays with the Saints” into online lecture series

first_imgIn light of the COVID-19 pandemic, the McGrath Institute for Church Life is launching virtual programming this fall to adapt to health and safety restrictions. One such series is “A Season with the Saints,” a digital take on the traditional “Saturdays with the Saints” lectures.The online edition of the perennial lecture series will offer participants the same opportunity to get to know six holy women and men venerated by the Catholic Church, but this year, the program will be a self-paced set of digital lectures. “A Season with the Saints” is free for all and accessible nationwide until Dec. 20.The modified programming is one of a number of digital offerings that the McGrath Institute has created in response to restrictions on in-person programming due to the pandemic.Program director of communications Amy North said that, despite the cancellation of in-person events, the McGrath Institute’s virtual courses have reached a broad audience among schools and parishes across the country. “A Season with the Saints” is anticipated to have a similar impact.The program is suitable for a range of audiences, from parish groups to Catholic schools. North said the digital format offers flexibility for ministers to adapt to their particular needs.“We wanted to release this entire series all at once, so that these folks could schedule their own gatherings to meet virtually to discuss the saints,” North said. “One of the main hopes is that we would reach those working as administrators, who would be able to then use this as a tool for their gatherings.”“A Season with the Saints” is part of a new initiative, the Sullivan Family Saints Initiative, at the McGrath Institute. Leonard DeLorenzo, director of undergraduate studies for the McGrath Institute, said the initiative is geared toward fostering both scholarship and devotion around the lives of the saints, in the campus community and in dioceses nationwide.“As part of our devotion and growth and love of the saints, this [initiative] can nourish the Catholic imagination and hopefully renew the church,” DeLorenzo said.Through the series, participants can learn from Notre Dame faculty and staff about St. Teresa of Calcutta, St. Padre Pio, St. Thérèse of Lisieux, St. John Henry Newman, St. Gertrude the Great and St. Nicholas. DeLorenzo said that all the saints chosen for the 2020 virtual series have feast days between Sept. 5 and Dec. 6, enabling participants to engage with the Catholic Church’s liturgical calendar through the lecture series.“It’s a way for people to not just learn about the saints, but to actually be moved toward prayer with the saints and the Church,” DeLorenzo said. “We wanted to direct people who are interested in learning about the saints towards the prayer with the saints that the liturgical calendar invites.”The McGrath Institute hopes that its online lecture series will, like the traditional in-person lectures, inspire participants through the lives of saints.McGrath Institute director John Cavadini said in an email that learning about the lives of the saints, through programs like “A Season with the Saints,” has the potential to impact people today.“The lives of the saints are a vision of hope,” Cavadini said. “The beautiful thing about the saints is that they are all different, so we find a vision of hope refracted through a myriad diversity of lenses.”Cavadini said that the saints’ responses to darkness in their own times can help people make sense of the current moment.“[In] a period like our own where we find isolation, sickness [and] political maneuvering at the expense of the common good, and narrowness of heart seemingly everywhere … the saints can help us see it through their eyes, to see through to a vision of hope and to have the courage to act on it,” he said.Tags: 2020 football season, COVID-19, mcgrath institute, McGrath Institute for Church Life, saturdays with the saints, Season with the Saints, Sullivan Family Saints Initiativelast_img read more

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Clayton Kershaw clinches the division for the Los Angeles Dodgers — and maybe an MVP award

first_imgThe best moments in sports are usually authored when the action deviates from the script. For the sold-out crowd at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, a Hollywood ending was good enough.Dodgers starter Clayton Kershaw (21-3) allowed one run in eight innings to beat the rival San Francisco Giants, leading the Dodgers to a 9-1 victory that clinched the National League West title.Kershaw hit his first career triple to drive in the Dodgers’ first run, then watched as Yasiel Puig homered in the sixth inning to give the Dodgers a 2-1 lead they would not relinquish. The 26-year-old pitcher might have made a prophet of the 53,387 fans in attendance, who were standing and shouting “M-V-P” in near unison as he walked off the mound.The victory assured the Dodgers of their second straight division title and an automatic trip to the National League Division Series, which begins Oct. 3. Their opponent — either the Washington Nationals or St. Louis Cardinals — will be determined over the final four days of the regular season.The Dodgers can enjoy a well-earned day off today, a time for manager Don Mattingly to begin formulating his NLDS roster.Baseball’s awards voters, meanwhile, can contemplate their ballots. Kershaw might become the first pitcher to win the National League MVP award since Bob Gibson in 1968. If not that and a third Cy Young Award — a cinch at this stage of the season — Kershaw is assured a place in baseball’s record books. If he doesn’t pitch another inning before the playoffs, Kershaw will finish with a major-league leading 1.77 earned-run average. No pitcher has led the majors in ERA in four straight seasons. Kershaw also leads the National League in wins (21) and strikeouts (239) despite not pitching the entire month of April.One more stat to consider: In four starts this season against the Giants, the Dodgers’ only rival for a division title, Kershaw went 3-0 and allowed six runs. He averaged eight innings in those four starts.Wednesday’s game was a tense battle until Puig’s home run off Giants starter Tim Hudson (9-13) sparked a four-run inning, turning a 1-1 tie into a 5-1 Dodgers lead. The Dodgers added four more runs in the eighth inning off the Giants’ bullpen to seal the deal.Puig wowed the crowd with his bat and his arm, throwing out Gregor Blanco trying to go from first to third on a single in the seventh inning. He leads the National League with 14 outfield assists.Carl Crawford and Juan Uribe each had two of the Dodgers’ eight hits. Uribe missed a home run just a few feet wide of the foul pole in left field.Former Giants closer Brian Wilson closed out the game with a scoreless ninth inning.The Dodgers enjoyed a postgame celebration fueled by 24 cases of beer, 204 bottles of champagne and four cases of Martinelli’s sparkling cider. Major League Baseball does not permit alcohol on its fields.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

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