Officer killed in attack to lie in honor in Capitol Rotunda

first_imgS. Greg Panosian/iStock(WASHINGTON) –U.S. Capitol Police Officer William “Billy” Evans, who died in the line of duty April 2 when a car struck him and then rammed into a barricade, will lie in honor Tuesday in the Capitol Rotunda.President Joe Biden, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and other members of Congress will participate in a tribute to Evans at 11 a.m. Tuesday.“In giving his life to protect our Capitol and our Country, Officer Evans became a martyr for our democracy. On behalf of the entire Congress, we are profoundly grateful. It is now the great and solemn privilege of the House of Representatives and the Senate to convey the appreciation and the sadness of the Congress and Country for the heroic sacrifice of Officer Evans with a lying-in-honor ceremony in the U.S. Capitol,” Pelosi and Schumer said in a joint statement about the ceremony last week.Earlier this week, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell also praised Evans, saying he was a “friend and favorite of many here on the Senate side” during a floor speech.“Officer Evans was famous within the Senate for his friendly spirit and easy manner. His particular post often meant he was literally the first line of defense of the Congress, the interface between these grounds and the outside world. We could not have had a kinder, more likable ambassador at this junction or a more faithful protector to keep us safe,” McConnell said. “It will be with tremendous grief but tremendous gratitude that we will walk Officer Evans through the Capitol for the final time tomorrow where he will lie in honor in the rotunda.”Evan’s family released a statement last week saying that the death “left a gaping void in our lives that will never be filled.”“The absolute most important thing in his life were his two children, Logan and Abigail,” the statement says. “His most cherished moments were those spent with them – building with Lego, having light saber duels, playing boardgames, doing arts and crafts and recently finishing the Harry Potter series. He was always so eager to show how proud he was of everything they did. Any opportunity to spend time with his children brightened both their lives and his. Their dad was their hero long before the tragic events of last week.”His family recounted his warmth, and how “funny and caring” he was, and said that he “relished bringing people together.”Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Continue Reading

A complicated problem, made worse by politics

first_imgTo some, it seems obvious that migrants are human beings forced to move, rather than amorphous threats against the state. But little about human beings is simple. On Friday, at the inaugural Mahindra Humanities Center conference on “Migration and the Humanities,” a panel of academics tackled different facets of the many population movements now crisscrossing the globe.And no surprise: The experts raised more questions than answers as they discussed a complicated problem worsened by adversarial administrations, here and abroad, and the untold suffering of millions.Before the final talk, on “Survival and Security,” Mahindra Center Director Homi Bhabha said the conference had two goals: The first was to focus on “the ways in which the humanities contribute to the centuries-long process of migration,” he said; the second, “How do the issues that are raised by migration — questions of justice, of citizenship, issues of security, of social and global equity — speak to the foundational paradigms of the humanities?” Junot Díaz gets personal — and political — at Harvard conference Related Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist brings multiple identities to ‘Migration and the Humanities’ John Hamilton, Harvard’s William R. Kenan Professor of German and Comparative Literature and chair of the department of Germanic Languages and Literature, said any discussion of survival and security brings up “modalities of living in the face of civil unrest and oppression, climate change and cultural displacement.”“The humanities are well-suited to posing key questions,” Hamilton said. For example: “What is the promise, and what are the limits of living securely? How might security circumvent new, unforeseen threats? How can we be carefree without being careless?”Inderpal Grewal, professor and chair of women’s, gender, and sexuality studies at Yale, put the focus on the concept of the state, and specifically nation-building. In Grewal’s home region of the Punjab, gender roles and the idea of a “militarized masculinity” have shifted, casting Sikh men first as the ultimate defenders and ideal police, and then, too often, as dangerous insurgents. Even more problematically, Grewal said that some Sikh men are still set up as defenders of a united India at the same time the prime minister is promoting Hindu nationalism.,In the Punjab, a region divided by Pakistan and India, and for the Sikhs, a religious minority, these issues are not new.“What is new,” Grewal said, “is that migrants are securitized.”Lisa Lowe, Distinguished Professor of English and Humanities and director of the Center for the Humanities at Tufts University, addressed the way current trends of migration are being framed as crises, a tactic that serves to detach the mass movements from their longstanding political roots.“We are living in a time of unprecedented migration from countries besieged by war, poverty, and unprecedented coups,” she said. Lowe said The New York Times last week put the number of forcibly displaced at approximately 64 million — “the highest number since World War II.”However, unlike that post-WWII migration, “contemporary migrants are largely from the global south,” Lowe said. She said most are “food refugees, climate refugees, and asylum seekers,” who seek entrance to — and are viewed as a threat by — the north, which parlays their numbers into a rationale for becoming “Fortress Europe.”Most migrants are people in crisis, and a refusal to face the underlying causes of their displacement — war, economic inequity, or climate change — compounds the issues they face, she said.“The migrant is viewed as stateless, homeless, and rights-less,” Lowe said. “Perhaps the migrant is a sign of our difficulty in reading the global present.”“Migration and the Humanities” was sponsored by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.last_img read more

Continue Reading

‘The Hitman’ is Wray & Nephew’s brand ambassador

first_imgBOXING: Contender SeriesKINGSTON:Described as ?a lean, mean, fighting machine?, Kemahl ?The Hitman? Russell, winner of the 2015 Wray & Nephew Contender Series, is the new Wray & Nephew White Overproof Rum Brand Ambassador.?Kemahl Russell is an exceptional athlete. He has combined top performance in his sport with resilience and spirit. These are precisely the qualities that are embodied in our Wray and Nephew White Overproof Rum brand,? said Pietro Gramegna, marketing manager, White Spirits at J Wray & Nephew Limited, in explaining their choice.Russell is expected to be a role model to the contestants in the upcoming season of the Wray & Nephew Contender Series.?Kemahl is a reflection of hard work, discipline and determination to reach the highest heights of boxing. He displays a heart of gratitude to the Wray & Nephew brand which has created the number one platform for boxing. He wants to show Jamaica that the Wray & Nephew Contender Series is an opportunity given to Jamaican boxers, which if taken seriously can be the beginning of the best to come.?Most of all, he displays the ?spirit of a fighter?. This is the one thing Jamaica could never forget about ?The Hitman?,? Gramegna further stated.Since winning the Wray & Nephew Contender Series for 2015, Russell has been training at Gleason?s Gym in Brooklyn, New York, under the tutelage of world class trainer, Hector Roca.With the assistance of his management team, Russell will be strategically placed in fights and moved through the ranks towards the world title.Russell, who grew up in the tough Tower Hill neighbourhood, says he won?t stop until he fights his way to the top.?Being a brand ambassador for Wray & Nephew rum means a lot to me. I think it ties in so well with who I am, as I always am in high spirits even when the going gets toughHe remains inspired by other sporting athletes as he pursues career excellence and shared that his boxing role model is the Jamaican hero of the 1970s and 80s, Mike ?The Body Snatcher? McCallum and his favourite sportsman is the fastest man of all time, Usain Bolt.?I admire Usain Bolt,? he said respectfully, ?for making our little country so pronounced in the world through sports?My career goal was to become a world champion, but is now to be remembered as one of, if not the best boxer Jamaica has produced.?He believes the Wray & Nephew Contender Series has revived boxing and kept the sport relevant in Jamaica.?I admire the Wray & Nephew brand for attaching itself to a sport such as boxing and creating opportunity for Jamaican boxers like myself to showcase their talent and improve their record,? Russell said.When his manager was asked ?what?s next for Russell??, she said: ?Kemahl will continue the same training programme in New York. At this stage of his career we are also assessing the trainers to determine who is best to develop and polish Kemahl?s natural fighting ability. But for now he will remain at Gleason?s Gym under the training of Hector Roca. We are presently trying to determine what his next fight will be. However, it is slated to be in March.?Wray & Nephew is assisting Kemahl financially with his entire training programme, which involves living expenses, nutrition and all the training related expenses, which we are extremely grateful for.?last_img read more

Continue Reading