…in brief

first_img…in briefOn 21 Aug 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article This week’s news in briefWork-life guidance A guide telling employers how to introduce work-life balance practices isbeing launched by the TUC today. Changing Times urges employers to set up ajoint union and management steering group to do a work-life balance audit. Italso provides guidance on how to survey staff over work patterns.  www.tuc.org.ukIgnorance of law cost Scottish bosses are incurring costs of up to £1bn because they are notup-to-date with changes in employment law, research reveals. A survey by lawfirm Peninsula finds that 80 per cent are unaware of recent changes inemployment law.  www.peninsula-uk.comTribunal change urged Employment tribunals should come under the control of the Lord Chancellor’sDepartment, a review of the tribunal system has recommended. Currently, theDepartment of Trade and Industry has administrative control of employmenttribunals.  www.lcd.gov.ukWoman’s pay adjusted Grampian Television has agreed to increase the salary of a female cameraoperator by £5,000 after she made an equal pay claim. Alison Parry discoveredin January 1999 that male camera operators were being paid more than her. Shewas jointly supported by the Equal Opportunities Commission and broadcastingunion Bectu.  www.eoc.org.ukJob insecurity tally Four out of 10 employees in manufacturing, IT, telecoms, engineering andfinance feel insecure about their jobs, according to an NOP survey. The surveyof nearly 1,000 employees shows that job insecurity increases with age with 44to 55-year-olds most concerned about the continuance of their job.  www.nop.co.ukWorkplace docusoaps We refer to the article published in the 31 July 2001 edition and wish toclarify that the photograph used was not a still taken from the documentaryPolice. last_img read more

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Jet ski tour sells the sizzle of life on blue chip block

first_img The Tates have since listed that property for sale with an asking price of $4.5 million.The family will be in good company with Gold Coast Mayor Tom Tate and his wife Ruth just up the road at 124 Commodore Drive, which they snapped up for $3.55 million in 2018.The Tates tried to flip that property in January with an asking price of $4.5 million after the adjoining three-lot riverfront site sold for a record $9.4 million. The blue chip block offers easy access to some of the city’s best assets.That sizzle sealed the deal on the sale of 85 Commodore Drive, with the buyers splashing out $3.18 million on their patch of paradise with the sale having settled on 8 April.It is understood the new owners are hoteliers who are relocating from Hong Kong to pursue business ventures on the Gold Coast.The family plans to build their dream home on the 1.013ha lot which boasts spectacular views of the water and city skyline and has 26.4 metres of direct water frontage.“Commodore Drive is the premier street on the Gold Coast,” Mr Mian said.“This location offers the ideal Gold Coast life — riding jet skis, going out in the boat and being close to town.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa8 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag1 day ago“The jet ski tour allowed them to see how close they are to Marina Mirage, Versace, the Broadwater and the Gold Coast Seaway.” Mayor Tom Tate snagged 124 Commodore Dr for $3.55 million in 2018. Principal Amir Mian and sale agent Carlie Mills of Amir Prestige jumped on a jet ski to sell a vacant blue chip block at 85 Commodore Drive, Paradise Waters.“When you’re selling waterfront property on the Gold Coast it pays to remember that what you’re really selling is the lifestyle that goes with it,” Mr Mian said.“You’re selling the sizzle.” Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 2:12Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -2:12 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenCOVID-19: What will happen to house prices? 02:13A leading prestige property agent has gone the extra mile to show one foreign family exactly what life on the Gold Coast’s elite riverfront street could look like.With no house to inspect and only an existing pontoon to work with, principal Amir Mian and sales agent Carlie Mills, of Amir Prestige Property Agents, had to get creative.The dynamic duo hired jet skis to allow the Hong Kong buyers to experience the lifestyle on offer at Commodore Drive, Paradise Waters, where a vacant blue chip block was being considered.last_img read more

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Blum: No. 44 restoration only creates buzz, does little to shift culture of Syracuse football

first_img Published on May 20, 2015 at 1:02 am Scott Shafer kept putting off answering the question that had been asked to him three times.“Is the lack of buzz right now (around Syracuse football) by design?”The final question of the final media opportunity of spring football on March 31 and Shafer denied that one had even been asked.“I’m still not hearing a question,” he said, and then said it again.Shafer, SU’s head coach, had spent an entire spring season trying to instill a sense of positivity around a team coming off a dismal 3-9 campaign, but there lacked the same hard-nosed buzz — the kind where you say you want to put “the fear of God” in your opponents — from when Shafer’s Orange was winning games.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“No I don’t think anyone designs a lack of buzz,” Shafer said, deciding to tackle the reporter’s question. “I think that would be really stupid.”Syracuse is a program that had lost its buzz. It’s not the same team that entered 2014 confidently boasting a plan for a run-and-gun, no-huddle offense. It’s not the same program coming in having won bowl games in three of the past four seasons.But on Tuesday afternoon, they gathered the big wigs of SU Athletics — Jim Boeheim, Daryl Gross and Floyd Little all in attendance — and did the best they could to bring that buzz back.No. 44, for the first time since Nov. 12, 2005, is on the open market. It’s a form of artificial excitement. It wasn’t a good year for Syracuse football on the field. Two touchdowns from a running back all season. An ejection and season-ending injury for the starting quarterback. A combined 30 interceptions and fumbles.Excitement on the field was virtually non-existent. No. 44 is a way to at least drum up excitement off it.“What a great day for Syracuse, Syracuse football and remembering three great players that played here and just what that number 44 means to this program,” Shafer said on Tuesday, minutes before the number was restored. “… It’s about the culture of Syracuse football.”The culture of Syracuse football now, though, is trying to overcome the worst season since 2008. The program right now can’t be compared to the years when the Orange gave the No. 44 to three of the greatest football players in the history of the sport. They can make a show of it, bring the number back and make it feel like old times, but the culture then and the culture now can’t be connected by restoring No. 44.It’s shown by the fact that in 2015, Syracuse won’t have a player, based upon on-field performance, even worth consideration for the number. George Morris and Devante McFarlane are serviceable running backs that have put the time and work in to become prominent parts of Syracuse’s rotation. But SU can’t and won’t restore the number for players that combined for fewer than 300 rushing yards last season.In all likelihood, the number will be worn again in 2016, with the arrival of four-star commit Robert Washington. He’s the one that the restore movement among SU fans has centered around and the one that could be tasked with ushering in a new era of the Syracuse ground game.But he won’t be here until 2016. And Syracuse was in need of something to rally around now.“If that’s the way we can attract the kind of player that can put our program back on track,” Little said of restoring the number, “Why shouldn’t we?”No. 44 was a hand that Syracuse had in its back pocket. Getting players through generated buzz, it’s what you do when most else has failed.Syracuse gift-wrapped Tuesday like a PR event. And it was that as Pete Sala, Gross, Little and Shafer all spoke. But then the big announcement exploded into a hoopla of celebration for Syracuse football fans everywhere.There was the 30-minute wait to break the biggest news before breaking ground on the No. 44 Plaza. It’s the kind of moment where everyone’s texting each other. The kind that puts a smile on even the most cynical fan’s face.It’s not to say that it wasn’t the right move. You can’t say something is wrong if it makes people excited. But it’s a publicity stunt that generates buzz, and as Shafer so smartly and simply stated, not generating that buzz would be stupid. The SU coaching staff can speak about a changed offensive identity or the improvement of players that will need to play key roles. But nothing creates that buzz like something tangible. No. 44 being back is tangible.But it doesn’t change the culture of Syracuse football. It’s just buzz until they couple the announcement with a winning season in 2015.Sam Blum is the sports editor for The Daily Orange, where his column appears occasionally. He can be reached at [email protected] or on Twitter at @SamBlum3. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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