[The Source Podcast] Dell EMC Forum 2017 Keynote, Minneapolis

first_imgThe Dell EMC Forum is a multi-format event experience designed for IT decision makers and executives seeking insights to cloud solutions and opportunities to engage with peers.“Realize your Digital Future”, this year’s Dell EMC Forum theme is all about helping IT become the business. Featuring executive keynotes and breakout tracks that cover Digital Transformation, Best of Breed Infrastructure, Converged Systems, Cloud Strategy and Workforce Transformation, the Dell EMC Forum offers something for everyone.Upcoming events in North America include: New York City, Chicago, Toronto, Boston, Montreal, Dallas, Vancouver, Seattle, Houston and St Louis. Register for the free event at www.dellemc.com/forumAaron Chaisson (@AaronChaison), VP Global Portfolio Messaging, was the Keynote Speaker for Minneapolis, MN. I caught up with Aaron in the field level suite of US Bank Stadium right after his keynote; that interview, and the full Keynote address is in this week’s Dell EMC The Source Podcast.Don’t miss “Dell EMC The Source” app in the App Store.  Be sure to subscribe to Dell EMC The Source Podcast on iTunes, Stitcher Radio or Google Play and visit the official blog at thesourceblog.emc.comDell EMC: The Source Podcast is hosted by Sam Marraccinilast_img read more

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Worth Dying For

first_imgThe recent death of champion freestyle skier Sarah Burke was nothing short of a tragedy. The world lost a young athlete with limitless potential. Sarah was as comfortable in the X-Games superpipe as she was on the red carpet, and she recently succeeded in getting the sport of free skiing into the Olympics. She was an icon, and her family, her sport, and her nation are still mourning her. That accident brings something to the forefront that we as athletes sometimes try to push out of our consciousness… the sports that we love can sometimes take our lives.The most disturbing part of Burke’s death is the circumstances. She was performing a routine trick in a non-competition setting, and was wearing proper safety equipment. She died as a result of a severed neck artery that led to cardiac arrest, and doctors said that better protective gear would not have changed the outcome. When events like this occur, they force us to explore the relationship with risk in our own lives, and ask the question: Is it worth dying for?This is a never-ending consideration that adventure sports athletes have grappled with. Climbers want to climb larger mountains, skiers want to ski more difficult lines, and kayakers want to push the envelope of runnable whitewater. These adventurous desires exist inside all of us, and those who possess a larger than normal helping are the ones who are out there pushing their sports to new levels. Climbing Everest, surfing the most massive waves that the planet can produce, or flying a wingsuit is inspiring to the rest of the world, and lifts the hearts of the entire human race to imagine the possibilities.But where do you draw the line? The inevitable reality of this flirt with the limits is that a few of us may actually find them. Passing away as a result of chasing what you love is something that is embroiled in controversy. You will probably hear as many opinions on this subject as the number of people you ask about it. But fatalities in the outdoors occur for a number of reasons, and are not always the result of negligence or bad decisions.Sometimes, things just go wrong. One saddening example of this was when professional kayaker Pat Keller lost his best friend on a remote river in British Columbia, Canada. The two were paddling together, and a freak surge sent the young man back upstream into a dangerous rapid after the two had walked around it.  Pat was helpless to assist, eventually falling into the river himself from his rescue efforts. He did everything that he could, and then made the walk out of that river all alone to find help.Nearly ten years later, Pat describes his bittersweet relationship with paddling:“As I get older, I have to constantly balance those risks with the consequences that I know are there. And oftentimes these days I find myself being more conservative.”This was an example of a misfortune that could not necessarily have been avoided. The other side of the coin is that the youth seem to have different proclivities with regards to risk today than in the past. Don’t get me wrong: every generation seems to have those opinions about the previous generation, but there are major societal forces at work today that influence the judgment and aspirations of the impressionable youth. Massive corporations are shifting their marketing budgets to enable willing athletes to push their sports to new heights through death-defying stunts. Extreme sports are edging their way into the mainstream via reality TV shows such as Nitro Circus, and people are now turning their attention from other traditional New Year’s Eve pastimes to watching hugely publicized motorcycle, snowmobile, and car stunts. It definitely seems as though “invincible” public figures are glorified, and although these stunts are extensively planned by professionals, the average teenager watching TV may not understand this. It would certainly be difficult to turn down: fame and riches in exchange for pushing your sport to its limits.Growing up as a whitewater kayaker, things weren’t always like that. As a kid, I was taught a solemn respect for nature and to never push it too far or too fast. Through the course of my life, I have definitely been told that what I do is foolish. I usually let that kind of thing slide, but it cuts a bit deeper when I hear it from family. I do not consider myself to have a death wish at all, and I look forward to a full life in which my contributions to the sport of kayaking are only the beginning of what I have to offer the world.I do not resent those who say these things to me, because I know that their feelings ultimately stem from fear. It seems as though Americans today fear a great number of things, but the recurring theme is the unfamiliar. Whether it is disease, terrorism or heights, we fear that which we do not understand, and subsequently judge those who don’t fear the same things. That is a dangerous state of mind, and flies in the face of the adventurous spirit that founded our country in the first place. What ever happened to the “go out and skin your knee” mentality that used to exist? Is it possible to have those same experiences via the Internet or video games? One interesting paradox lies in the fact that automobile accidents are a huge cause of death in the U.S., and most of us aren’t filled with dread when we put the key in the ignition every day.I will admit that I’ve had a few brushes with death during my 15 years of paddling whitewater. One instance in particular could easily have gone the other way. I was paddling the Chattooga River one Christmas Eve, and I managed to pin myself in a slot on one of the rapids of the dangerous Five Falls section of the river. My boat sank deeper and deeper as the force of the current wedged it into an underwater crack, and to my surprise I realized that I could not get out of the boat. The current was pinning me down, and my legs were trapped.The situation went from a fun, carefree day with friends to a struggle for my life in a matter of seconds, and as I flailed underneath the infinitely powerful waters of the river, I suddenly felt very guilty. How could I put my family through this on Christmas Eve? After my own death became a dire possibility and that thought flashed through my brain, I fought like I’ve never fought before. I very easily came to the realization that I wanted oxygen badly enough that nothing else mattered, and I somehow kicked off my shoes inside the boat, and made every effort to bend my legs sideways to slide out of the boat. In my mind, breaking my legs at the kneecaps was completely acceptable. They bent in a way that they never had before, and I tumbled out of my boat after over a minute of struggling. I couldn’t walk for a week, but I survived.That experience was a reminder of something that I already knew: the decisions that we make out there can have very real consequences. It also reinforced my determination not to die on the river. I have lived my life in a somewhat non-traditional way… doing my last year of high school by correspondence to travel, taking a year off between high school and university, and making the outdoors and discovery of nature a high priority in my life. If I were to pass away doing what I love, the people who criticized me in the past would say, “it was only a matter of time,” and would take my death as a validation of their own ignorant assumptions. I’ve always wanted to prove that the rat race is not for everyone, and that I can live my life the way that I love without compromise. That may take different forms as I grow older, but I hope that I can feel as though I’m doing that forever.So how do we reconcile ourselves with this (sometimes unavoidable) risk that comes with our sports? The first step in my opinion is to acknowledge that it is present, and to think very seriously about how much risk we are comfortable with accepting in our lives. This will help to guide every decision in the future, and will be different for every person.Once this is done, it’s important to become as educated as possible on the many ways to minimize that risk. No matter what your sport, it is important to carry with you the appropriate safety gear and know how to use it. Think avalanche beacons, pin kits, and medical provisions. The aim should always be to turn yourself into the biggest possible asset to your group, and as I write this I can think of a few ways that I will improve my own portfolio of skills this year.It’s also important to learn any lessons possible from past accidents or tragedies in your field. It is never productive to point fingers after an event like this, but knowledge can often be drawn from these events, and carried with us for use in case of a future crisis.Finally, when it comes down to the moment, we should affirm that the decision to go is for the right reasons. Taking a calculated risk should not be for the cameras, to impress anyone, uphold a reputation, or because it will create a legacy. Do it because it feels right, and because you are 100% sure that you can follow through successfully. Make decisions for yourself, and follow your gut.This dialogue brings up a final and pivotal question that seems to be at the heart of this fine balance: On a subconscious level, is this risk and the stark reality of our own mortality part of what draws us to these sports?Perhaps making life and death decisions and proceeding with confidence is in fact an infinitely purifying and rewarding process. Believing in your own abilities with the ultimate price on the line is something that few people have actually experienced, and that self-confidence can transfer to and carry value in any aspect of life, from business to relationships. There is a part of us that still needs to live the primal life. It is our way of facing the tiger and reacting swiftly and confidently.Our sports can be dangerous at times, but with humility and a safety-minded approach, they can provide a lifetime of joy.“The sensations one feels in these activities is comparable to falling in love,” says Keller. “You never know when your heart may break, but until that point, it’s all love.”For some amazing music from the likes of Great American Taxi and Paul Thorn check out this month’s Trail Mix!last_img read more

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‘Maersk Forza’ hired for helicopter recovery operation

first_imgThe Maersk Forza subsea construction vessel, usually used for oil and gas activities, has been hired to help with recovery of a helicopter that went missing on Thursday, offshore Norway.According to Accident Investigation Board Norway (AIBN), on October 26, 2017 helicopter flight CVS312 was en-route from Pyramiden to Kapp Heer with eight persons on board.The crew was last in contact with the air traffic services at Longyearbyen at 1506 hours local time. They were then instructed to contact Kapp Heer. The helicopter was soon after reported missing.“The assumption is that the helicopter has crashed during the approach two kilometers north of Kapp Heer. A large-scale search and rescue operation is ongoing. The Accident Investigation Board Norway has initiated an investigation supported by the Russian Interstate Aviation Committee,” AIBN said.AIBN on Tuesday morning said that the recovery vessel Maersk Forza was contracted and the vessel was en route to Hammerfest.“Personell from the AIBN will board the vessel in Hammerfest and plan the recovery of the helicopter on the way to Svalbard,” AIBN said.The Maersk Forza was built in 2008 under the name of REM Forza. It was later sold by REM Offshore to Maersk Supply Services.  The 250 tons Hydramarine crane aboard supports the lifting operations for a range of tools, equipment and subsea assets.According to DeepOcean, which manages the vessel, Maersk Forza spread has been main vessel for inspection, maintenance, installation and decommissioning projects in both The North Sea and West Africa.Offshore Energy Today Stafflast_img read more

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Badgers unable to fight off emotions

first_imgThe Badgers’ men’s hockey team received their championship rings over the summer at ex-captain Adam Burish’s cabin and shared that moment together to reflect on an incredibly memorable run to the NCAA Championship.Friday night, the defending champions got to share their joy with their faithful fans at the Kohl Center.Just before Wisconsin’s first home series of the 2006-07 season, the players skated out to a fanatically energized crowd of 14,336, and enjoyed a three-minute video montage of the highlights of UW’s sixth national championship season. All of this was capped by the big moment of the night, the dropping of Wisconsin’s championship banner accompanied by a shower of fireworks.UW head coach Mike Eaves, who also won an NCAA Championship with Wisconsin as a captain in 1977, said he and his coaching staff thoroughly enjoyed the moment.”The coaching staff … had goosebumps,” Eaves said. “The fans knew the plays, and when a play was shown, the crescendo of noise would rise, it was very emotional.”Goaltender Brian Elliott said because the Badgers had been there to experience the events shown in the video, it was seeing the banner for the first time that players valued the most.”We’ve seen those hits; we’ve seen those saves; we’ve seen the goals before this summer,” Elliott, a senior, said. “It wasn’t so much the video as having the banner up there and just getting ready to start this new season off at the Kohl Center.”Last night, it was something more of a restart to this next season,” Elliott continued. “That’s what we were mainly thinking, and I think that was the attitude towards that through the whole team.”Senior winger Jake Dowell added that the experience was even more powerful for the freshmen who weren’t around to win a ring on last year’s team.”For the younger guys it’s their first time at the Kohl Center, and that’s a heck of a way to start your career at the Kohl Center, to see that,” Dowell said. “The noise that the fans were making and the banner being raised, how exciting that was, I’m sure there were some jitters, and I think it was tough.”It was obvious early on in the series how tough it was for Wisconsin. Several Badgers said leading up to the home opener that they were going to try and bask in the remembrance of last year’s championship, enjoying the banner drop while staying focused on the task at hand. Aftereffects of the ceremony were quickly evident, as North Dakota came out to a faster start than the Badgers did.”I thought we stood around and watched a lot in the first period, which is a byproduct of maybe the ceremony, a little bit of North Dakota,” Eaves said Friday, when Wisconsin lost in overtime 3-2. “But I actually thought in the second half of the game we started to play the way that we needed to. The feeling on the bench was we’re either going to get a point, or we have a chance at winning on this. Unfortunately, the turnover was there, and they capitalized on it.”Though the Badgers did start to get after the puck late in the game and managed to send the game to overtime on a third-period Jack Skille goal, senior captain Andrew Joudrey was disappointed with his team’s sluggishness after the puck dropped in the first period.”For the first period-and-a-half, they wanted the puck more than us, they wanted to battle,” Joudrey said. “I thought in the third, we started to do some good things. We started to win some battles and started to play our systems a little bit better. Overall, they won the game, so they battled more than [we] did.”It’s got to be 60 minutes for us to be successful,” Joudrey said. “There’s no excuse to start like we did.”Eaves admitted to the difficulty of adjusting to a game-time mentality in a matter of a few minutes, but said things will get easier for next weekend with the banner officially raised.”You try to tell the kids, ‘OK, enjoy the moment,’ then you’ve got to turn the switch. That’s a difficult thing to do,” Eaves said. “That may have been a contributor of last night’s start for us, but it was very emotional, fun to watch, but it’s behind us now, and we can focus on the present.”last_img read more

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