Will Bloom box replace power grid Details on Wednesday w Video

first_img Algae bloom fouls Florida Keys © 2010 PhysOrg.com (PhysOrg.com) — The hot energy news for this week comes in the form of a small box called the Bloom box, whose inventor hopes that it will be in almost every US home in the next five to 10 years. K.R. Sridhar, founder of the Silicon Valley start-up called Bloom Energy, unveiled the device on “60 Minutes” to CBS reporter Leslie Stahl on Sunday evening. Although Sridhar made some impressive claims on the show, he left many of the details a secret. This Wednesday, the company will hold a “special event” in eBay’s town hall, with a countdown clock on its website suggesting it will be a momentous occasion – or at least generating hype. Explore further Sridhar explained that the fuel cells inside the Bloom boxes are made from sand turned into thin ceramic squares, each side coated with a green or black “ink.” A single cell can power about one light bulb, but a stack of 64 of the cells could be “big enough to power a Starbucks,” Sridhar said. In between each disk there’s a metal plate, but the Bloom box supposedly uses a cheap metal alloy instead of expensive platinum. One of Bloom Energy’s early critics, Michael Kanellos of Green Tech Media, noted that researchers have been working with fuel cells since the 1830s. On “60 Minutes,” he told Stahl that, if Sridhar succeeds in making the technology affordable and efficient, there will likely be others that can, too.“The problem is then G.E. and Siemens and other conglomerates probably can do the same thing,” he said. “They have fuel cell patents; they have research teams that have looked at this,” Kanellos said.”What do you think the chances are that in ten-plus years you and I will each have a Bloom box in our basements?” Stahl asked Kanellos.”Twenty percent,” he said. “But it’s going to say ‘G.E.'”Further details on the Bloom box – its efficiency; the materials it’s made of; how much carbon dioxide, water, heat, and other emissions it produces – are still secret. In a blog post Monday afternoon, Kanellos said that he had found a US patent filed by Bloom in 2006 and granted in 2009 that mentions the material “yttria stabilized zirconia” as well as electrodes made of metals in the platinum family – although this doesn’t necessarily mean anything. More information may be revealed at Wednesday’s event, which will feature John Doerr, partner in the venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins, which has provided financial assistance to the company. (Sridhar told Stahl that an estimate of $400 million raised by Bloom so far is “in the ballpark.”) Former Secretary of State Colin Powell, a member of Bloom Energy’s board, is also scheduled to be in attendance.• Join PhysOrg.com on Facebook!• Follow PhysOrg.com on Twitter! More information: CBSlast_img read more

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Iron rods go through masons body as he falls from roof finds

first_imgKolkata: Three iron rods pierced the body of a mason after he fell from the roof of an under-construction building at Champahati area of Baruipur in the South 24-Parganas district on Wednesday morning.The victim, identified as Uday Sardar, was immediately taken to the Baruipur Super-Specialty Hospital by the local people. The doctors in the hospital did not want to take any risk as the patient still had the three iron rods that had gone through the right side of his abdomen. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeThe victim was then taken to Calcutta National Medical College and Hospital (CNMCH), where a digital x-ray was performed on the patient. It was not easy for the technicians to carry out the x-ray as he had to be kept in a seated posture.The doctors at CNMCH successfully removed the three rods from his body, following a critical surgery that lasted for hours. The patient, however, is still stated to be in a critical condition due to the severe nature of his injuries. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedAfter examining the reports, the doctors at the hospital found that one rod was located near his kidney, while another was close to his intestine. The third one was below his liver.The hospital authorities felt the need of an emergency surgery but there were many challenges before them.A medical board has been formed, comprising 7 doctors including the head of the department of general surgery and the heads of the Orthopedic department, Cardiothorasic department, Neuro surgery and Urology department of the hospital. The medical board was in a fix as the iron rods were nearly 3 feet long. The main concern for the doctors was removing the rods as it could make the patient bleed to death.Senior PWD engineers were asked to rush to the hospital and see if they could make the rods shorter in length by cutting them from both ends, as it would have been extremely difficult for the doctors to remove the rods otherwise.The PWD engineers, however, told the doctors that cutting the rods which had already pierced his body, might damage the organs due to the vibration which will be created.The medical board later started the operation on Wednesday evening, with the PWD engineers inside the OT. A huge quantity of blood was arranged by the hospital authorities before starting the operation.A senior official of the hospital said that the iron rods have been removed successfully.last_img read more

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Majority of Global Merchants Fall Short on Card Data Security Compliance

first_img This story originally appeared on Reuters March 11, 2015 Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Four out of five global retailers and other merchants failed interim tests to determine whether they are in compliance with payment card data security standards, putting them at increased risk of cyberattacks, according to a new report by Verizon Communications Inc.Businesses must be vigilant in maintaining security to remain compliant with the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS), required by payment card issuers. Most of the companies have a tendency to run upgrades of security software and hardware only when they approach an annual compliance check, according to Verizon.The report, which gathered data in 30 countries by assessing more than 5,000 merchants including retailers, financial institutions and hospitality firms among others, found only 20 percent of those tested to be fully compliant less than a year after installing security safeguards.From 2013-2014, overall compliance went up by 18 percentage points for 11 out of the 12 payment data security standards.The report acknowledged the standards are only a baseline, an industry-wide minimal acceptable standard. The volume and scale of breaches in the past 12 months have shown that this is not stopping attackers, Verizon said.However, out of all the data breaches in the past 10 years that Verizon studied, not a single company was found to be compliant at the time of the breach.Credit and debit cards account for two-thirds of purchases by value in the United States. A further $2.17 trillion is spent via electronic methods, such as PayPal and mobile payments — many of which are ultimately backed by card transactions, the report said.(Reporting by Nandita Bose; Editing by Jim Finkle and Ken Wills) Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. 2 min read Register Now »last_img read more

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