Oteil Burbridge To Join Jaimoe’s Jasssz Band At Upcoming Florida Jazz And Blues Jam

first_imgThe Florida Jazz and Blues Jam will return to Sunset Cove Amphitheatre in Boca Raton, FL on January 26th, 2019. Headlining the event is founding Allman Brothers Band drummer, Jaimoe, and his Jaimoe’s Jasssz Band.Today, the festival has added Dead & Company bassist Oteil Burbridge to join his former ABB bandmate, Jaimoe, in the Jasssz Band as a special guest. Burbridge performed in the Allman Brothers Band from 1997 through the band’s final shows in 2014. In addition to ABB and Dead & Company, he’s also made music and toured with Tedeschi Trucks Band, Aquarium Rescue Unit, and Vida Blue, along with his own rotating supergroups of Oteil and the Peacemakers and Oteil & Friends.Also playing the 2019 Florida Jazz and Blues Jam will be the Larry Carlton Quintet, led by nineteen-time Grammy-nominated, four-time Grammy-winning guitarist Larry Carlton. Slide Guitar virtuoso Sonny Landreth will perform a rare and full 90-minute set at Florida Jazz and Blues Jam 2019. Fifteen-year-old guitarist child prodigy Brandon “Taz” Niederauer will open up the Florida Jazz and Blues Jam, so be sure to get there early.Tickets to the 2019 Florida Jazz and Blues Jam are currently available. For more information, head to the event’s website.last_img read more

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Time off from Harvard helped her thrive

first_imgThis is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.For Blessing Jee, one of the best things about her Harvard education was putting it on hold.Jee knew when she arrived that she would take time off from her studies. What she didn’t expect was that it would make her “fall back in love with Harvard” — and set her, newly energized, on her future path. When she graduates in May, Jee will take another break before returning to pursue public interest law at Harvard Law School.“Harvard has been my home. Now I have the skills and the ability to make more homes and new homes in different places,” said Jee, who when she was 2 moved from Seoul, South Korea, to Kentucky, and moved again, when she was 7, to the Los Angeles area. “I am excited to leave and explore and be in the world again.”Jee, a sociology concentrator, credits her parents with helping inspire her interest in social justice work. Her father, a Methodist minister, took part in democratization movements in Korea in the 1980s, and Jee considers her mother her “first philosophy teacher” and feminist role model.Jee’s activism took shape in high school where she remembers demonstrating after the death of Trayvon Martin and helping stage a sit-in to protest school budget cuts that led to teacher furloughs. Growing up in a minority-majority city, Jee felt attuned to “social dynamics and to diversity and race in America.” She said that understanding has prompted her to always “be aware of who is in the room who is not in the room, who is at the table who is not at the table.”“At Harvard, I have always thought about who’s not here, whose voices are not being heard,” said Jee, co-founder of the Asian American Women’s Association, and a student mentor to incoming freshmen and current College sophomores.Jee followed her older sister, Haemin, to Cambridge, based in part on Haemin’s advice that at Harvard she would make friends for life, be challenged intellectually, and find opportunities she could never imagine. “And that was it,” said Jee, who started at Harvard in 2013, when her sister was a senior. Haemin had another critical tip:“She said her biggest regret during her Harvard time was not taking a year off. It just rang true with me, and it was just so exciting that was even possible during college — the ability to go out and do something that’s different and then come back and recharge and have a different outlook with those new experiences behind me.”So, in 2015-16, Jee worked first for the nonprofit Sunlight Foundation as a policy intern, researching federal regulations regarding campaign finance reform. In the spring, she was a law clerk for the L.A. District Attorney’s office investigating a high-profile case and assisting deputy district attorneys for trial. She also researched education and disability rights as part of a successful effort to help her mother’s friend who wanted her autistic son to remain in his public school.Her year away from Harvard, said Jee, “helped me realize my passion for public service could be translated into a calling towards public interest law.”After her junior year, a summer internship as an investigator with the Bronx Defenders, working with underserved clients, confirmed her decision that law was her next step. It also helped her begin to view forgiveness as part of the justice system. To fully process her role as a defense investigator, Jee said she needed “to allow for the possibility of forgiveness to exist between these two people, one who committed the crime, the other who was the victim.”Her experience with the Bronx Defenders and the impressions it made have dovetailed with her recent role as a Radcliffe research partner. For the past several months, Jee has been working with former Harvard Law School Dean Martha Minow, who is writing a book about forgiveness in the law. Jee said Minow, whose work includes research into amnesty and pardons, debt relief, and child soldiers, helped her see that “forgiveness has a real place in the law and it shouldn’t be discarded just because the law should just be principled and objective.”“Working with Professor Minow has really fleshed that out for me and given me a more nuanced view of the law I think will be helpful when I go to law school.”Minow, the Carter Professor of General Jurisprudence and current Radcliffe Fellow, called working with Jee “joyous because of her wide-ranging interests, precise reasoning, and boundless energy and generosity. … It is unusual to find someone so powerfully able to combine deep focus and wide vision. She will bring tremendous talents to the Harvard Law School.”What’s next for Jee is another break from school. She applied and was accepted her junior year to Harvard Law School’s deferral program, which admits students early with the stipulation that they work for two years before enrolling. She will teach English in Chile this fall with a program run by the Chilean Ministry of Education and backed by the United Nations.Harvard, said Jee, has perfectly prepared her to step into yet another world and another home. The best kinds of homes, she said, “are the ones that equip you to leave them.”First, she will enjoy one more Harvard milestone: graduation. It’s a day that holds a special relevance for Jee. Her junior year in high school she took part in a program for aspiring journalists sponsored by the Newseum Institute in Washington, D.C. The prominent Civil Rights leader John Lewis, this year’s Commencement speaker, was one of the program’s featured guests.“He was one of the heroes in my high school social justice curriculum,” said Jee, who was able to ask Lewis about what he brought with him from his activist days into his political career. The longtime Georgia congressman told her the common denominator was “righteous anger” and an unyielding sense of justice. “He said at the core, it’s always about doing right for and to others,” Jee recalled.“He made me realize social justice work could take many forms, as long as you carry with you that same spirit of justice and generosity and liberality toward man. I wrote about that in my Harvard College application and now he’s coming to speak. It’s just come full circle. And I am so excited to hear him.”last_img read more

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Day of Man returns to campus

first_imgThursday, the Siegfried Ramblers will brave the South Bend cold in only t-shirts, shorts and flip-flops in solidarity with the homeless as they celebrate “Day of Man.”Photo courtesy of Thomas Ridella This annual fundraiser raises money for the South Bend Center for the Homeless, Day of Man co-commissioner Thomas Ridella said. Residents collect money from students, staff and faculty on the day itself but also encourage donations from family and friends who wish to support the cause as well, Ridella said.“In previous years we have raised between $6,000 to $8,000, and last year we hit a record $10,000. We are aiming for $12,000 this year, and we’re hoping the addition of an online donation page will help with our efforts,” co-commissioner Alexander Campbell said. “The Center’s need grows each year, and we are hoping our support can grow to meet that demand.”The fundraiser began nine years ago, Ridella said.“A sophomore in Siegfried was walking home from off campus with only shorts and a t-shirt and actually noticed just how cold it can get in South Bend,” he said. “This realization turned into an event that year to help one of the greatest organizations in our community that helps the homeless all year, and particularly in these cold winter months.”Generally, more than 200 of the Siegfried residents participate, Campbell said.“We take pride in the strength of our community and the willingness of our residents to bear a burden so that others’ may be lessened,” he said. “Siegfried gets stereotyped as an athletic, masculine dorm. On Day of Man, we live up to that ideal.”The event also proves why Siegfried is called the “Hall of Champions,” junior James Bowyer said.“[A] champion … means ‘a person who fights or argues for a cause or on behalf of someone else.’ Siegfried’s Day of Man is a chance for us all to be champions in another, much more important, sense,” Bowyer said. “We, the entire campus, get the opportunity to come together as a family and be champions for a cause that desperately needs help.“… What I am trying to say is that I participate because, at the end of the day, I know that whatever sickness I get will fade (along with the numbness that comes from walking to [DeBartolo Hall]), but the people who are struggling with homelessness don’t know when or if they will be able to bounce back and that is not fair.”Day of Man allows the participants to give back to the community while also raising awareness of the difficulties the homeless face every day, junior Brian Davis said.“It helps put a little bit into perspective what the homeless have to deal with every, and if, in the process, we are able to raise a lot of money for them … Well, then, that’s just something special that gets everyone interested,” Davis said.Sophomore Eric Salter said the camaraderie of Day of Man makes it an experience not to be missed.“I would not mistake walking to class in freezing temperatures in summer wear as enjoyable, but, when doing so with 200 of your best friends and neighbors, it becomes an act of unity,” Salter said. “Close sense of community is one the greatest aspects of Notre Dame life, and this event is a quintessential example of it.”The annual event provides a way to bond with fellow Ramblers as well as helping a great cause, junior Jack Szigety said.“Every time you walk by another Rambler in a bright t-shirt and shorts, you can’t help but feel a bond, even if you’ve never spoken,” Szigety said. “The real beauty of the day is that it does all this while supporting the incredible cause of helping the homeless during the harsh winter months in South Bend.”Temperatures are predicted to be below freezing on Thursday, with a chance of snow, but when asked how the event’s participants will deal with the cold, the organizers simply said, “What cold?”To donate to Day of Man, go to studentshop.nd.edu, select “Residence Halls” and select “Siegfried Hall.” Checks payable to South Bend Center for the Homeless, with “Day of Man” as the memo, can be delivered to Fr. John Conley in 100 Siegfried Hall or directly to the center: Center for the Homeless, 813 S. Michigan St., South Bend, IN 46601.Tags: Center for the Homeless, Day of Man, Siegfried Ramblers, South Bend Center for the Homelesslast_img read more

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An Act of God’s Jim Parsons Discusses His Heavenly Broadway Return

first_img Related Shows An Act of God View Comments Four thousand-time Emmy winner Jim Parsons is back on the Great White Way as the Great Creator in An Act of God. On May 8–the morning after his first preview–Parsons stopped by The Today Show to discuss his Broadway return and his divine role. “Theater is so rejuvenating for me,” said Parsons, who last appeared on Broadway in 2012’s Harvey. “Every time I go back, it’s like touching home base again.” And as for those questioning him playing the Almighty? “Haters gonna hate. I don’t know, what would God say?” You can find out exactly what He would say at Studio 54. The show, written by David Javerbaum, opens officially on May 28. Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 2, 2015last_img read more

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Andrew Polec & Christina Bennington Set for London’s Bat Out of Hell

first_img Star Files It’s all coming back to us now! Bat Out of Hell—The Musical is set to premiere in the U.K. next year, playing Manchester Opera House in the spring before heading to London. According to Daily Mail, the production, based on the most influential albums of Jim Steinman’s storied collaboration with singer Meat Loaf, will star The Fantasticks’ Andrew Polec as Strat and Christina Bennington as Raven.Directed by Jay Scheib, Bat Out of Hell is a romantic adventure about rebellious youth and passionate love against the backdrop of a post-cataclysmic city. Following Strat, who has fallen in love with the daughter of the despotic Falco, this new musical is a high-octane rock‘n’roll adventure that tears through over 20 of Steinman’s songs. Classic numbers will include “I’d Do Anything for Love (But I Won’t Do That),” “You Took the Words Right Out of My Mouth,” “Dead Ringer for Love,” “It’s all Coming Back to Me Now,” “Two Out of Three Ain’t Bad,” and “Bat Out of Hell.”The first Bat out of Hell album is one of the best-selling of all time, with 43 million sales; it’s sequel sold more than 14 million copies worldwide. Steinman was behind the short-lived Dance of the Vampires on Broadway and collaborated with Andrew Lloyd Webber on Whistle Down the Wind in the West End.Watch Jeremy Jordan belt “It’s all Coming Back to Me Now,” below, just because. You’re welcome. View Comments ‘Bat Out of Hell’center_img Christina Bennington Andrew Poleclast_img read more

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Drought Could Reduce Hay Supply

first_img Sharon Omahen is a news editor with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Experts/Sources: Georgia’s drought conditions have cattlemen worried about howthe lack of rain is affecting their winter hay supply.When you rely on hay to feed your animals, you have good reasonto worry when the fields are parched. Newton County cattlemanJames Ruark is praying for rain for his alfalfa hay fields. “Myfields only got about a half an inch of rain in April and that’snot hardly enough to do any good,” said Ruark. “We’renot out of grass or out of pasture, but we’re not in great shapeeither.”Looking ahead, cattlemen know that weather conditions thissummer determine how they will feed their cattle this winter.University of Georgia animal scientists recommend farmers takean inventory now and plan ahead for the winter months.”The first thing to remember is not to panic because youhave time to prepare for the winter,” says Mark McCann, ananimal scientist with the UGA College of Agricultural and EnvironmentalSciences. “Next, cattlemen need to inventory their feed sourcesand determine what they have versus what they will need this winter.”McCann says cows normally eat from 20 to 25 pounds of hay perday.He also suggests cattlemen look into alternative feed sources.”Crop residues, such as wheat and rye straw, can be usedas cattle feed sources,” said McCann. “They aren’t idealfor cows, but they will provide roughage.”But if crop conditions don’t improve, McCann suggests cattlemenbe prepared to take action, before winter arrives. “Takea head count and then count your hay supply,” says McCann.”Once you have that figure, sell the cattle you know youwon’t be able to feed.”But which ones should be sold first? “If a cow isn’t pregnant,sell her because she’s not offering revenue and she’s occupyingspace needed for productive members of the herd,” said McCann.James Ruark has already applied McCann’s advice. “I solda load this morning and shipped them to a feedlot,” he said.”Maybe the weather will turnaround and help us. I hope itdoes.”The animal scientist says Georgia’s hay crop is actually aheadof schedule due to the lack of rain. “Hay cutting is aheadthis season because of the dry weather, but the tonage of hayis down,” said McCann. “The nice thing to always rememberis, pastures and day crops can rebound very quickly. We just haveto keep our fingers crossed and pray for rain.”(Photo by Scott Bauer, USDA.)center_img Mark McCannlast_img read more

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Weed Prevention.

first_img Weed seed can come in when you incorporate manure in the garden. Many weeds’ seeds pass through the animal without being digested and will be in the manure. Composting the manure will reduce the problem. Mulch materials can harbor weed seed, too. Use only coastal Bermuda hay, which doesn’t produce seed. It’s grown from cuttings and doesn’t have seed heads. Many of the other types of hay will have weed seeds, including wheat straw. Many of the books you read say to dig the garden deep. Well, this is good in one way — it buries the weed seed deep. But at the same time, deep digging brings up weed seeds that haven’t seen the light for many years. Many can live 10 to 12 years and then germinate when conditions are right. Remove Weeds NowThe best thing, though, is to remove the weeds now, before they produce mature seeds.Pull, hoe, chop, rototill, mulch, bury, burn, eat (yes, some people actually like to eat purslane)or destroy them in some manner.A wise man once said, “Friends come and go, but enemies accumulate.” For thegardener, the enemies are the weeds. For that perfect garden next year, get the weeds outthis year. My father used to say, “One year of seeds, son, and you can count on seven yearsof weeds.”What he was saying was that the one year that you let the weeds mature and produceseeds will return and haunt you for the next seven years. Like most things he told me,this has surely come to pass.Weeds are your garden’s enemies. They rob precious water and nutrients from your gardenplants. They harbor insects and diseases. They compete for light. And most of all, theycause you untold work trying to keep them under control.Actually, the best control is the easiest: don’t let them grow. Garden weeds are goingto seed now, so now is the time to remove them from your garden. Compost them orotherwise, but just make sure that they don’t fall and remain in the garden area.Other Weed ControlsThree other controls of weed seed that might be helpful:last_img read more

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Chilean Naval Elements Support USNS Comfort Mission

first_imgBy Felipe Lagos/Diálogo January 08, 2019 Three units of the Chilean Navy joined the hospital ship USNS Comfort’s crew to support U.S. Southern Command-sponsored humanitarian mission Enduring Promise 2018. The Chilean military came aboard the medical campaign on the second half of the boat’s trip in Latin America. The three units of the Chilean Navy, Lieutenant Commander Jaime Gaete, Lieutenant Valentina Martínez, and Petty Officer Second Class Juan Pinilla, boarded the ship on November 16. The service members, who carried out duties as technical physicians and provided dental services, stayed on board until December, when the ship returned to its home port in Norfolk, Virginia. Through the participation of its units, the Chilean Navy sought to learn about long-range missions and exchange knowledge. The support of the Chilean institution also served to demonstrate the friendship between the partner nations. “We are cooperating with the U.S. Navy to the best of our ability,” Lt. Cmdr. Gaete told Diálogo. “The idea is to learn from them about logistics and organization, but also to contribute with what we know and have learned during this time. We know the pillars of the [Chilean] Navy’s Health Directorate, and our idea is to work accordingly, to the best of our ability.” Relieving pressure Between October and December 2018, the USNS Comfort conducted an 11-week humanitarian mission in Central and South America, providing medical care on board and in medical sites on the ground. The mission helped relieve pressure on national medical systems, caused partly by the increase in Venezuelan migrants escaping from the situation in their country. The crew of more than 900 medical personnel, including U.S. and partner nation military service members and nongovernmental volunteers, examined thousands of patients in Ecuador, Peru, Colombia, and Honduras. Chilean health personnel joined the mission in the port of Turbo, Colombia, after accepting a formal invitation from the U.S. Embassy in Chile. “We got to work with an organized ship that cooperates with several countries, where everything has gone smoothly,” said Lt. Cmdr. Gaete. “Given its size, the ship can’t reach any port, and disembarkation is done entirely by helicopter or boat,” the officer added, highlighting the operation’s efficiency. Providing assistance During more than a month on board, the Chilean officers helped people in Turbo and Riohacha, Colombia, as well as in Trujillo, Honduras, with dental care as part of the 15-member dental team. For his part, Petty Officer 2nd Class Pinilla worked as a transfusion specialist at the blood bank. “What surprised me the most during this mission is the number of patients who live in remote areas and don’t have access to health services,” Sgt. Pinilla said. “[I’m also surprised] to see the indigenous populations that don’t get assistance because they can’t communicate due to their language, and the support the [Colombian] government has offered by being present in these vulnerable areas and providing support with all the necessary resources.” Lt. Cmdr. Gaete explained that many dental cases were basic, including cleaning and tooth extraction. However, some patients needed more urgent assistance. “[There were] many reconstructive procedures, many children, and a few cases of tongue cancer, which had to be referred to the ship to remove the tumors,” the officer said. “In general, people are grateful. We try to relieve pain as much as we can, and, most importantly, to eliminate infections. […] Seeing people so grateful, who understand what we are doing, is very rewarding.” According to the Chilean officers Colombia’s stops stood out, as the service members were able to observe the differences between the patients of each region. “It’s been very different,” Lt. Cmdr. Gaete said. “Turbo is a town with a lot of low-income Colombian people, and Riohacha is a town one hour away from the border with Venezuela. It consists of a very vulnerable Venezuelan population, many of them helpless and without access to health care.” The experience was rewarding, and the navy service members feel lucky to have been a part of the humanitarian mission. For Lt. Cmdr. Gaete, the privilege was doubled, as the officer participated in the mission of the USNS Mercy in Asia and the Pacific in April 2018. “Personally, it’s been a unique experience, since I was able to increase my knowledge professionally, getting to know other cultures, assisting on the ground with the different health conditions in each town we went to,” Petty Officer 2nd Class Pinilla said. “As a member of the Chilean Navy, it’s been a great experience. The love and affection of the people we helped will without a doubt be one of my best memories from this mission for the rest of my life.”last_img read more

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Closing Arguments in Hempstead Clerk Misconduct Case

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Hempstead Town Clerk Mark BonillaHempstead Town Clerk Mark Bonilla was described as a criminal manipulator of his staff and innocent target of a political smear campaign Wednesday in closing arguments of his misconduct and coercion trial.Assistant District Attorney Jed Painter gave a PowerPoint presentation during his closing comprised of transcripts from previous days’ testimony, text messages between witnesses and Bonilla’s phone records.“Loyalty is a word you heard from every witness,” Painter told the court while referring to past and current Bonilla employees that testified.He argued that despite having “witnesses with conflicting objectives and conflicting backgrounds,” they all agreed that Bonilla allegedly sought compromising photos of former employee Ariel Davis, who filed a sexual harassment complaint against him, in an attempt to discredit her.Bonilla’s defense attorney, Adrian DiLuzio, argued in his closing that there has been a “discrepancy in the testimonies” of the witnesses.He said that Alex Desidoro, Davis’ ex-boyfriend and fellow former employee that Bonilla allegedly requested the photos of Davis from, “expressed discomfort, but not an unwillingness” in sharing them and that the photos were first offered to Bonilla to make him aware of their existence.DiLuzio also continued to question the credibility of Davis’ complaint.“They were after something on Mark Bonilla, and they found it, and they ran with it,” he said. “It’s a disgrace that this case is in the courtroom.”In his closing, Painter said that the evidence makes clear that Desidoro did not offer Bonilla photos, but that they were requested of him.“If Desidoro offered the photos, it would have been a five second conversation, not several days,” he said.The closing arguments came after Bonilla’s secretary, Tara Kavanagh, testified that Bonilla did not act inappropriately towards women and did not threaten his employees.She said that Bonilla is a “touchy person,” but that he “does that to everybody.”Judge Sharon Gianelli expected to issue her verdict July 25 at First District Court in Hempstead. Bonilla faces up to a year in jail, if convicted.last_img read more

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Race economics and mortgage lending

first_imgby: Henry Meier“Buying a home is easier if you’re white” reported CNN yesterday based on the findings of a  research report put together by Zillow with a forward by the National Urban League. The report, which was much more measured in its conclusions than some of the news headlines it generated,   makes these headline grabbing assertions in its executive summary:–Fewer minorities apply for conventional mortgages. Although Hispanics and Blacks make up 17 percent and 12 percent of the U.S. population, respectively, they represented only 5 percent and 3 percent of the conventional Mortgage application pool.-Blacks experience the highest loan application denial rates. 1 in 4 blacks willbe denied their conventional loan application, as opposed to 1 in 10 whites.-Wide disparities in homeownership rates among ethnic groups persist.73.9 percent of whites own a home, whereas 60.9 percent of Asians, 50.9percent of Hispanics and 46.5 percent of blacks own. continue reading » 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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