Vermont unemployment rate rises half-point to 6.9 percent

first_imgThe Vermont Unemployment rate rose a half-point in December to a seasonally adjusted 6.9 percent, according to figures released today by the US Department of Labor. This is the highest rate since last spring, when the rate peaked at 7.4 percent last May. The December 2009 rate is exactly one-point higher than the December 2008 rate of 5.9 percent.“All our labor market indicators were down in December, resulting in a fairly large increase in Vermont’s unemployment rate” said Patricia Moulton Powden, Commissioner of the Vermont Department of Labor. “For example, there were a number of previously announced layoff events that took affect in late November and early December. December typically has the highest number of payroll jobs of any month. While we saw an unadjusted increase in jobs this month, it was below typical levels. Since job levels and unemployment rates have been stable for several months now, we will have to wait and see if December was an anomaly.”Seasonal Job GrowthTypically we expect an increase averaging 4,200 jobs in December. Before seasonal adjustment, Total Non-Farm (TNF) jobs grew by only 2,100 or 0.7% over the month. The annual rate unadjusted job growth improved to -1.9% though this will be revised as we complete our annual benchmarking process. This rate of annual loss is much better than what we have seen in the last few months, but this is due to an overstated job loss estimate in December of 2008 rather than any recent change in the job market. Most of the seasonal gains came from Leisure & Hospitality, (5,000 jobs or 18.4%). The largest seasonal declines were observed in Construction, (-1,500 or -11.7%) Manufacturing, (-1,000 or -3.3%) and Professional & Business Services, (-700 or -3.3%). Surprisingly, Retail Trade showed no seasonal growth over November, (-50 jobs or -0.1%).When seasonally adjusted, December payroll jobs fell by 2,400 or -0.8% from November. Only Leisure & Hospitality showed any significant seasonally adjusted growth, (1,100 or 3.6%). Manufacturing (-1,000 or -3.3%) Retail Trade, (-600 or -1.6%) Construction, (-500 or -4.0%) and Professional & Business Services, (-400 or -1.9%) all showed significant job losses.Employment GrowthVermont’s December seasonally adjusted unemployment rate increased by five tenths of a point to 6.9% percent as a result of declining employment and a modest increase in the number of unemployed. Vermont’s labor force fell back closer to the levels seen prior to November. Vermont’s December seasonally adjusted employment, unemployment levels and unemployment rate were statistically different from November levels. For comparison purposes, the US seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for December was 10.0 percent, unchanged from the November rate.December unemployment rates for Vermont’s 17 labor market areas ranged from 4.0 percent in Hartford to 9.2 percent in Newport. Local labor market area unemployment rates are not seasonally adjusted. For comparison, the December unadjusted unemployment rate for Vermont was 6.6 percent, up four-tenths of a point from November 2009 and up 0.7 points from a year ago. The December unadjusted estimates were not statistically different from November values.The planned implementation of the final phase of methodology changes in the Current Employment Statistics (CES) program has been delayed until the January 2010 estimates (published in March). These new procedures are designed to bring state job estimates more in line with national estimates. The initial change in methodology resulted in a sharp shift downward in November and December, 2008 job estimates which now appear to have overestimated job loss. As a result, year over year comparisons for November and December are not valid until we have completed the annual benchmark process. The benchmark process will be complete by January 2010. As we move forward we can expect small sample states like Vermont to exhibit a higher degree of variability in month to month job estimates. As a result of this change in methodology, caution should be used in interpreting single month’s results. CES payroll job numbers are now best understood in the context of their movement over several months as opposed to observed changes in a single month estimates. For details of these changes, please contact Andy Condon at the Vermont Department of Labor at 802-828-4153 or andrew.condon@state.vt.us(link sends e-mail).Regional and state unemployment rates were generally higher in December. Forty-three states and the District of Columbia recorded over-the-month unemployment rate increases, four states registered rate decreases, and three states had no rate change, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Over the year, jobless rates increased in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The national unemployment rate was unchanged in December at 10.0 percent but was 2.6 percentage points higher than a year earlier.In December, nonfarm payroll employment increased in 11 states and the District of Columbia and decreased in 39 states. The largest over- the-month increase in employment occurred in Virginia (9,500), followed by Oklahoma (5,000), Oregon (2,900), New Hampshire and Wash ington (2,000 each). New Hampshire, Oklahoma, and Virginia experi enced the largest over-the-month percentage increase in employment (0.3 percent each), followed by the District of Columbia, Hawaii, and Oregon (0.2 percent each). The largest over-the-month decrease in employment occurred in California (-38,800), followed by Texas (-23,900), Ohio (-16,700), Illinois (-16,300), Michigan (-15,700), Wisconsin (-15,200), and Georgia (-15,100). Montana (-1.5 percent) experienced the largest over-the-month percentage decrease in employment, followed by Nevada (-1.0 percent), Iowa and South Dakota (-0.9 percent each), and Vermont (-0.8 percent). Over the year, non- farm employment decreased in all 50 states but increased in the District of Columbia. The largest over-the-year percentage decreases occurred in Wyoming (-6.8 percent), Nevada (-6.6 percent), Michigan (-5.1 percent), and Arizona (-4.8 percent).Regional Unemployment (Seasonally Adjusted)The West had the highest regional jobless rate in December, 10.7 per- cent. The Northeast recorded the lowest rate, 9.2 percent. The North- east had a statistically significant rate increase over the month (0.5 percentage point). The South had the only other significant re- gional rate change (0.3 percentage point). Over the year, all four regions registered significant rate increases, the largest of which was in the West (3.3 percentage points). (See table 1.)Among the nine geographic divisions, the Pacific continued to report the highest jobless rate, 11.7 percent in December. The East North Central recorded the next highest rate, 11.3 percent. The West North Central registered the lowest December jobless rate, 7.3 percent, followed by the West South Central, 8.0 percent. The South Atlantic rate (10.3 percent) set a new series high. (All region, division, and state series begin in 1976.) Five divisions experienced statistically significant unemployment rate increases from a month earlier, the largest of which were in East South Central and New England (0.5 percentage point each). No division had a rate decrease. All nine divisions reported significant over-the-year rate increases of at least 1.8 percentage points. The largest of these occurred in the East South Central (3.8 percentage points) and East North Central (3.7 points).State Unemployment (Seasonally Adjusted)Michigan again recorded the highest unemployment rate among the states, 14.6 percent in December. The states with the next highest rates were Nevada, 13.0 percent; Rhode Island, 12.9 percent; and South Carolina, 12.6 percent. North Dakota continued to register the lowest jobless rate, 4.4 percent in December, followed by Nebraska and South Dakota, 4.7 percent each. The rate in South Carolina set a new series high, as did the rates in three other states: Delaware (9.0 percent), Florida (11.8 percent), and North Carolina (11.2 percent). The rate in the District of Columbia also set a new series high (12.1 percent). In total, 27 states posted jobless rates significantly lower than the U.S. figure of 10.0 percent, 10 states and the District of Columbia had measurably higher rates, and 13 states had rates that were not ap- preciably different from that of the nation. (See tables A and 3.)Twenty-one states reported statistically significant over-the-month unemployment rate increases in December. Louisiana and Mississippi experienced the largest of these (0.8 percentage point each). One state, South Dakota, saw a statistically significant rate decrease from November (-0.2 percentage point). The remaining 28 states and the District of Columbia registered jobless rates that were not appreciably different from those of a month earlier, though some had changes that were at least as large numerically as the significant changes. (See table B.)All states and the District of Columbia recorded statistically significant increases in their jobless rates from December 2008. The largest of these increases were in Nevada and West Virginia (4.6 percentage points each), closely followed by Alabama (4.5 points) and Michigan (4.4 points). The smallest rate increases occurred in Minnesota and Nebraska (0.8 percentage point each). (See table C.)Nonfarm Payroll Employment (Seasonally Adjusted)In December, 13 states experienced statistically significant over-the- month changes in employment, all of which were decreases. The largest statistically significant job losses occurred in California (-38,800), Ohio (-16,700), and Illinois (-16,300). The smallest statistically significant decreases in employment occurred in Vermont (-2,400), South Dakota (-3,600), and Montana (-6,400). (See tables D and 5.)Over the year, 44 states experienced statistically significant changes in employment, all of which were decreases. The largest statistically significant job losses occurred in California (-579,400), Texas (-276,000), Illinois (-237,300), Florida (-232,400), and Michigan (-207,100). The smallest statistically significant decreases in employ- ment occurred in South Dakota (-10,900), Delaware (-12,100), and Montana (-13,700). (See table E.)____________ The Metropolitan Area Employment and Unemployment news release for December 2009 is scheduled to be released on Tuesday, February 2, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. (EST). The Regional and State Unemployment 2009 Annual Averages news release is scheduled to be released on Friday, February 26, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. (EST). The Regional and State Employment and Unemployment news release for January is scheduled to be released on Wednesday, March 10, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. (EST).Table A. States with unemployment rates significantly differ-ent from that of the U.S., December 2009, seasonally adjusted————————————————————– State | Rate(p)————————————————————–United States (1) ……………….| 10.0 |Alaska …………………………| 8.8Arkansas ……………………….| 7.7California ……………………..| 12.4Colorado ……………………….| 7.5Connecticut …………………….| 8.9Delaware ……………………….| 9.0District of Columbia …………….| 12.1Florida ………………………..| 11.8Hawaii …………………………| 6.9Illinois ……………………….| 11.1 |Iowa …………………………..| 6.6Kansas …………………………| 6.6Louisiana ………………………| 7.5Maine ………………………….| 8.3Maryland ……………………….| 7.5Michigan ……………………….| 14.6Minnesota ………………………| 7.4Montana ………………………..| 6.7Nebraska ……………………….| 4.7Nevada …………………………| 13.0 |New Hampshire …………………..| 7.0New Mexico ……………………..| 8.3New York ……………………….| 9.0North Carolina ………………….| 11.2North Dakota ……………………| 4.4Ohio …………………………..| 10.9Oklahoma ……………………….| 6.6Oregon …………………………| 11.0Pennsylvania ……………………| 8.9Rhode Island ……………………| 12.9 |South Carolina ………………….| 12.6South Dakota ……………………| 4.7Texas ………………………….| 8.3Utah …………………………..| 6.7Vermont ………………………..| 6.9Virginia ……………………….| 6.9Wisconsin ………………………| 8.7Wyoming ………………………..| 7.5————————————————————– 1 Data are not preliminary. p = preliminary.Table B. States with statistically significant unemployment rate changesfrom November 2009 to December 2009, seasonally adjusted————————————————————————- | Rate | |———–|———–| Over-the-month State | November | December | rate change(p) | 2009 | 2009(p) |————————————————————————-Colorado …………………..| 6.9 | 7.5 | 0.6Connecticut ………………..| 8.2 | 8.9 | .7Delaware …………………..| 8.6 | 9.0 | .4Florida ……………………| 11.5 | 11.8 | .3Louisiana ………………….| 6.7 | 7.5 | .8Massachusetts ………………| 8.7 | 9.4 | .7Mississippi ………………..| 9.8 | 10.6 | .8Montana ……………………| 6.4 | 6.7 | .3New Mexico …………………| 7.8 | 8.3 | .5New York …………………..| 8.6 | 9.0 | .4 | | |North Carolina ……………..| 10.7 | 11.2 | .5North Dakota ……………….| 4.1 | 4.4 | .3Pennsylvania ……………….| 8.5 | 8.9 | .4South Dakota ……………….| 4.8 | 4.7 | -.2Tennessee ………………….| 10.2 | 10.9 | .7Texas ……………………..| 8.0 | 8.3 | .3Utah ………………………| 6.3 | 6.7 | .4Vermont ……………………| 6.4 | 6.9 | .5Virginia …………………..| 6.6 | 6.9 | .3Washington …………………| 9.0 | 9.5 | .5West Virginia ………………| 8.4 | 9.1 | .7Wisconsin ………………….| 8.2 | 8.7 | .5————————————————————————- p = preliminary.Table C. States with statistically significant unemployment rate changesfrom December 2008 to December 2009, seasonally adjusted————————————————————————- | Rate | |———–|———–| Over-the-year State | December | December | rate change(p) | 2008 | 2009(p) |————————————————————————-Alabama ……………………| 6.5 | 11.0 | 4.5Alaska …………………….| 6.8 | 8.8 | 2.0Arizona ……………………| 6.6 | 9.1 | 2.5Arkansas …………………..| 5.7 | 7.7 | 2.0California …………………| 8.7 | 12.4 | 3.7Colorado …………………..| 5.8 | 7.5 | 1.7Connecticut ………………..| 6.6 | 8.9 | 2.3Delaware …………………..| 5.7 | 9.0 | 3.3District of Columbia ………..| 8.2 | 12.1 | 3.9Florida ……………………| 7.6 | 11.8 | 4.2 | | |Georgia ……………………| 7.5 | 10.3 | 2.8Hawaii …………………….| 5.1 | 6.9 | 1.8Idaho ……………………..| 6.1 | 9.1 | 3.0Illinois …………………..| 7.2 | 11.1 | 3.9Indiana ……………………| 7.8 | 9.9 | 2.1Iowa ………………………| 4.4 | 6.6 | 2.2Kansas …………………….| 5.0 | 6.6 | 1.6Kentucky …………………..| 7.6 | 10.7 | 3.1Louisiana ………………….| 5.5 | 7.5 | 2.0Maine ……………………..| 6.5 | 8.3 | 1.8 | | |Maryland …………………..| 5.4 | 7.5 | 2.1Massachusetts ………………| 6.4 | 9.4 | 3.0Michigan …………………..| 10.2 | 14.6 | 4.4Minnesota ………………….| 6.6 | 7.4 | .8Mississippi ………………..| 7.8 | 10.6 | 2.8Missouri …………………..| 7.1 | 9.6 | 2.5Montana ……………………| 5.0 | 6.7 | 1.7Nebraska …………………..| 3.9 | 4.7 | .8Nevada …………………….| 8.4 | 13.0 | 4.6New Hampshire ………………| 4.3 | 7.0 | 2.7 | | |New Jersey …………………| 6.8 | 10.1 | 3.3New Mexico …………………| 4.7 | 8.3 | 3.6New York …………………..| 6.6 | 9.0 | 2.4North Carolina ……………..| 8.1 | 11.2 | 3.1North Dakota ……………….| 3.3 | 4.4 | 1.1Ohio ………………………| 7.4 | 10.9 | 3.5Oklahoma …………………..| 4.6 | 6.6 | 2.0Oregon …………………….| 8.3 | 11.0 | 2.7Pennsylvania ……………….| 6.4 | 8.9 | 2.5Rhode Island ……………….| 9.4 | 12.9 | 3.5 | | |South Carolina ……………..| 8.8 | 12.6 | 3.8South Dakota ……………….| 3.7 | 4.7 | 1.0Tennessee ………………….| 7.6 | 10.9 | 3.3Texas ……………………..| 5.6 | 8.3 | 2.7Utah ………………………| 4.1 | 6.7 | 2.6Vermont ……………………| 5.9 | 6.9 | 1.0Virginia …………………..| 5.0 | 6.9 | 1.9Washington …………………| 6.5 | 9.5 | 3.0West Virginia ………………| 4.5 | 9.1 | 4.6Wisconsin ………………….| 5.9 | 8.7 | 2.8Wyoming ……………………| 3.2 | 7.5 | 4.3————————————————————————- p = preliminary.Table D. States with statistically significant employment changes fromNovember 2009 to December 2009, seasonally adjusted————————————————————————– | November | December | Over-the-month State | 2009 | 2009(p) | change(p)————————————————————————–Alabama…………………..| 1,898,900 | 1,888,500 | -10,400California………………..| 14,186,800 | 14,148,000 | -38,800Georgia…………………..| 3,854,800 | 3,839,700 | -15,100Illinois………………….| 5,628,500 | 5,612,200 | -16,300Iowa……………………..| 1,482,000 | 1,468,800 | -13,200Michigan………………….| 3,846,700 | 3,831,000 | -15,700Montana…………………..| 437,400 | 431,000 | -6,400Nevada……………………| 1,166,200 | 1,154,600 | -11,600Ohio……………………..| 5,103,600 | 5,086,900 | -16,700South Dakota………………| 404,100 | 400,500 | -3,600 | | |Tennessee…………………| 2,646,600 | 2,636,700 | -9,900Vermont…………………..| 294,600 | 292,200 | -2,400Wisconsin…………………| 2,727,500 | 2,712,300 | -15,200————————————————————————– p = preliminary.Table E. States with statistically significant employment changes fromDecember 2008 to December 2009, seasonally adjusted————————————————————————– | December | December | Over-the-year State | 2008 | 2009(p) | change(p)————————————————————————–Alabama…………………..| 1,953,500 | 1,888,500 | -65,000Arizona…………………..| 2,534,100 | 2,412,000 | -122,100California………………..| 14,727,400 | 14,148,000 | -579,400Colorado………………….| 2,320,600 | 2,234,000 | -86,600Connecticut……………….| 1,673,900 | 1,614,900 | -59,000Delaware………………….| 421,900 | 409,800 | -12,100Florida…………………..| 7,576,100 | 7,343,700 | -232,400Georgia…………………..| 4,013,600 | 3,839,700 | -173,900Hawaii……………………| 609,400 | 586,100 | -23,300Illinois………………….| 5,849,500 | 5,612,200 | -237,300 | | |Indiana…………………..| 2,899,400 | 2,796,300 | -103,100Iowa……………………..| 1,508,900 | 1,468,800 | -40,100Kansas……………………| 1,389,600 | 1,329,900 | -59,700Kentucky………………….| 1,823,800 | 1,764,500 | -59,300Louisiana…………………| 1,948,600 | 1,901,700 | -46,900Maine…………………….| 604,800 | 588,800 | -16,000Maryland………………….| 2,568,400 | 2,524,000 | -44,400Massachusetts……………..| 3,230,200 | 3,164,000 | -66,200Michigan………………….| 4,038,100 | 3,831,000 | -207,100Minnesota…………………| 2,722,300 | 2,642,400 | -79,900 | | |Mississippi……………….| 1,127,200 | 1,101,400 | -25,800Missouri………………….| 2,770,900 | 2,708,300 | -62,600Montana…………………..| 444,700 | 431,000 | -13,700Nebraska………………….| 963,700 | 938,300 | -25,400Nevada……………………| 1,235,600 | 1,154,600 | -81,000New Jersey………………..| 4,000,500 | 3,910,400 | -90,100New Mexico………………..| 843,100 | 817,100 | -26,000New York………………….| 8,713,500 | 8,544,900 | -168,600North Carolina…………….| 4,048,200 | 3,924,000 | -124,200Ohio……………………..| 5,271,800 | 5,086,900 | -184,900 | | |Oklahoma………………….| 1,595,600 | 1,558,900 | -36,700Oregon……………………| 1,689,600 | 1,617,200 | -72,400Pennsylvania………………| 5,749,200 | 5,598,900 | -150,300Rhode Island………………| 471,200 | 453,800 | -17,400South Carolina…………….| 1,884,100 | 1,846,400 | -37,700South Dakota………………| 411,400 | 400,500 | -10,900Tennessee…………………| 2,726,100 | 2,636,700 | -89,400Texas…………………….| 10,631,300 | 10,355,300 | -276,000Utah……………………..| 1,246,700 | 1,200,100 | -46,600Virginia………………….| 3,711,200 | 3,656,500 | -54,700 | | |Washington………………..| 2,923,700 | 2,834,900 | -88,800West Virginia……………..| 757,400 | 738,500 | -18,900Wisconsin…………………| 2,832,800 | 2,712,300 | -120,500Wyoming…………………..| 303,100 | 282,400 | -20,700————————————————————————– p = preliminary.last_img read more

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Jamaica Combats Human Trafficking

first_img The Government of Jamaica spent approximately $15 million during the 2010 and 2011 fiscal years to support victims and pass more legislation to combat trafficking in people. The U.S. Department of State’s 2011 Trafficking in Persons Report notes that the country is a source, transit point, and destination for adults and children subjected to sex trafficking and forced labor. The document highlights the progress made in the protection of trafficking victims during the reporting period. The minister of state in the Jamaica Ministry of National Security, St. Aubyn Bartlett, said that while the main piece of legislation already in effect is the Trafficking in Persons Act of 2007, the government continues to provide subsidiary laws. Despite limited resources, free legal, medical and psychological services are offered to victims of human trafficking. Sources: Jamaica Observer, South Florida Caribbean News By Dialogo January 01, 2012last_img read more

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Peru’s Strong Presence in Peacekeeping Missions

first_imgBy Marcos Ommati/Diálogo November 09, 2017 Peru’s participation in United Nations (UN) peacekeeping missions is decades old—the nation is a founding member of the UN. In fact, in 1988, under the leadership of former UN Secretary-General Javier Pérez de Cuéllar, who was Peruvian, UN Peacekeeping Forces received the Nobel Peace Prize. Peru’s participation in UN missions goes back to 1958, when the nation sent troops to Lebanon. Since then, members of the Peruvian Army, Navy, and Air Force have participated in peacekeeping missions in countries like Israel, Namibia, Ivory Coast, Cyprus, and Haiti.Diálogo spoke with Brigadier General Fernando Hernán Fitzcarrald Guerrero, head of the International Affairs Office of the Peruvian Armed Forces Joint Command[NG1] , about Peruvian military participation in peacekeeping missions around the world and the role of the Peru Engineer Company in the Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA), among other issues.Diálogo: How did Peru’s participation in UN peacekeeping missions start and consolidate?Brigadier General Fernando Hernán Fitzcarrald Guerrero, head of the International Affairs Office of the Peruvian Armed Forces Joint Command: Our nation has always been sensitive to the efforts of the United Nations to help achieve and reinforce the noble goals of peace and peaceful coexistence—a fundamental  condition for economic and social development for people around the world. The Peruvian Armed Forces’ current participation in UN peacekeeping missions falls under the Memorandum of Understanding signed between the United Nations and the Peruvian government on November 11th, 2003.Diálogo: What is the purpose of Peru’s participation in peacekeeping missions?Brig. Gen. Fitzcarrald: We seek to have a greater participation of the Peruvian Armed Forces in UN peace operations and fulfill the international commitments of our government related to world peace and respect for human rights. Another objective is to implement mechanisms to promote and increase female service members’ participation in peacekeeping missions as general staff officers and military observers. Another important aspect is to promote Peru’s image internationally, allowing us to share our culture, cuisine, and folklore, among other things, with the military and civilian personnel from other countries in peacekeeping missions.Diálogo: How many Peruvian service members are participating in peacekeeping missions?Brig. Gen. Fitzcarrald: In November 2004, the first Peruvian contingent traveled to Haiti. It included 205 personnel from the three military branches and was initially set up in the city of Jacmel. During the Peru Company’s participation, more than 20 contingents have been sent to Haiti—a total of 6,125 male and 114 female service members. We have an engineering company with 205 personnel deployed in MINUSCA, and we also have officers in military observer positions and members of the General Staff in missions in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Central African Republic, South Sudan, Darfur, and Abyei. We are also completing the process for a 250-person infantry company to deploy in peacekeeping missions. That company is already registered among the national commitments made with the United Nations.Diálogo: What has been Peru’s contribution to peacekeeping missions?Brig. Gen. Fitzcarrald: Peru’s contribution to peacekeeping missions has been with personnel and material used not only to guarantee people’s protection, but also to aid with the transition process, to facilitate humanitarian assistance, to promote and defend human rights, and to support demobilization and reintegration. Our Armed Forces have done an outstanding job completing the various peacekeeping missions that we participate in.Diálogo: The Peru Engineer Company is a contingent that was recently deployed to MINUSCA. Could you talk about that?Brig. Gen. Fitzcarrald: Following their arrival on January 7th, 2016, the 205 military members who make up the Peru Engineer Company deployed and installed their equipment as part of MINUSCA. The Peru Engineer Company comprises 145 members from the Army, 41 from the Navy, and 19 from the Air Force. They perform construction and maintenance duties for airports, highways, and bridges in the country as part of the work assigned by the UN, and they are relieved annually for a 10-year period under agreements with the United Nations. It’s worth noting that on January 6th, 2016, the Peru Engineer Company deployed to Bangui, the capital of the Central African Republic, where they completed their induction process and administrative procedures. Later, they moved to the city of Bouar, where they focused on the work assigned by the United Nations. Our nation’s participation in MINUSCA was completed within the framework of a Memorandum of Understanding between the Peruvian government and the United Nations, through which our country demonstrated its commitment to contribute to the international organization’s peacekeeping missions.Diálogo: Can you provide details about the duties of the Peruvian contingent in support of the Central African Republic?Brig. Gen. Fitzcarrald: The engineer company performs maintenance and construction duties on unpaved runways as well as heliport repair, in addition to other roadwork, highway, and bridge maintenance work the UN assigns to contribute to peace and development in the Central African Republic. Among the complementary duties that Peruvian service members perform in Africa are land clearing—including [soil] compaction and leveling needed to build an aerodrome—restoring, building, and maintaining unpaved runways; repairing, building, and maintaining heliports; and transporting construction materials.Diálogo: What progress has the 2016 contingent made on the aerodromes in the Central African Republic?Brig. Gen. Fitzcarrald: Initially, the mission of the Peru Engineer Company deployed in the Central African Republic was to build and maintain 35 airfields. However, over the course of the deployment, they were assigned other duties. This year, we’ve been responsible for building two aerodromes, and building and maintaining 490 kilometers of highway in different areas that the mission is responsible for. From an engineering standpoint, the work requires a large amount of human resources and materials in a harsh geographical environment with high temperatures and the presence of armed groups, among other issues.Diálogo: Can you give us some examples of some of the main challenges that the Peruvian contingent faced in the construction of aerodromes and highways and how were they overcome?Brig. Gen. Fitzcarrald: The main challenges for the Peru Engineer Company are the instability—the lack of public safety in the mission area due to the presence of hostile armed groups—the rugged geography, and the various endemic diseases, particularly malaria, which affected our personnel. We’ve kept the risks to a minimum with the use of, adequate prophylaxis and preventive treatments.Diálogo: What are the results of the Security Council’s assessment of MINUSCA and other missions?Brig. Gen. Fitzcarrald: During its two-year mission in the Central African Republic, the Peruvian contingent has effectively and efficiently carried out its duties. As such, in coordination with the Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO), there are plans to deploy more military personnel in the MINUSCA mission to increase the good work of our unit.Diálogo: How does the Peruvian Armed Forces’ experience contribute to the fight against terrorism and cooperation with partner nations’ forces in peacekeeping missions?Brig. Gen. Fitzcarrald: The combat experience of our Armed Forces in their ongoing fight against terrorism has provided us the professional experience to do a good job in the peace missions, where the presence of our nation has been requested, creating a precedent in the United Nations, which is why DPKO plans to deploy a force similar to the one that existed in Haiti up to 2015.Diálogo: Would you like to add anything else for Diálogo’s readers?Brig. Gen. Fitzcarrald: The Joint Command, in coordination with the Peruvian Navy, initiated the process to make the participation of these units feasible:A mechanized Marine Corps company.A logistics resupply ship with a helicopter onboard.A guided missile frigate with a helicopter onboard.This process takes time due to budgetary, logistic, organizational, and equipment planning, and to adapt to UN and other regulations. That’s why the participation of these units won’t be official until 2018.last_img read more

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571st MSAS Provides Key C-130 Training to Colombian Air Force

first_imgBy U.S. Air Force’s 621st Contingency Response Wing Public Affairs April 22, 2020 U.S. Air Force airmen from the 571st Mobility Support Advisory Squadron (MSAS) worked with the Colombian Armed Forces as part of a mobile training team from February 11 through March 11 at two air bases in Colombia.The team was comprised of 15 air advisors from the 571st MSAS at Travis Air Force Base, California, and six total force instructors from three other U.S. Air Force units. The training covered a variety of areas of cooperation between the U.S. and Colombia.It aimed at supporting Colombia in their pursuit to counter transnational and transregional threat networks and to enhance the capability of the Colombian Air Force (FAC, in Spanish) to maintain regional security through increased proficiency in mobility support operations.The training was conducted at the Military Air Transport Command in Bogotá, and the 1st Combat Air Command in Palanquero, both in Colombia. The training topics focused on C-130 aircraft maintenance, aerial firefighting procedures, search and rescue, intelligence, and medical intelligence.U.S. Air Force Technical Sergeant Jacob Haines shows Colombian Air Force maintainers proper maintenance techniques and electrical system familiarization and troubleshooting during a mobile training team mission, March 5, 2020, in Colombia. (Photo: U.S. Air Force’s 621st Contingency Response Wing Public Affairs)The C-130s, located at the Military Air Transport Command, are the workhorse of the FAC fleet, capable of conducting a diverse mission set. Throughout the engagement, 571st MSAS maintenance air advisors worked with the FAC to develop their maintenance philosophy, systems knowledge, and best practices and procedures. A heavy focus was placed on the C-130 engine, hydraulic, fuel, environmental and electrical system familiarization, and troubleshooting.Instructors conducted training through classroom briefings and hands-on training on the aircraft, to gain a thorough understanding of Colombian maintenance practices.“The students were very engaged in the training we provided,” said U.S. Air Force Technical Sergeant Jacob Haines, 571st MSAS advisor. “I am confident that our students’ capacity to properly maintain their C-130 fleet has increased.”Additionally, the 571st MSAS team provided ground training to the Colombian air force on Modular Airborne Fire Fighting Systems, or MAFFS, a system loaded into the back of a C-130 aircraft that drops fire retardant to aid in stopping the spread of wildfires.Employing an aerial firefighting capability will help the FAC in combatting wildfires, both internally and internationally. The specialized training, provided by the U.S. Air Force Reserve Command personnel, was a stepping stone to future work with the FAC on further enhancing this capability.“While a very effective fire-fighting tool, this specific mission set requires consistent practice,” said U.S. Air Force Lieutenant Colonel Richard Pantusa, 731st Airlift Squadron MAFFS instructor pilot from Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado. “It is inherently a dangerous mission — flying low over mountainous terrain that is on fire. The FAC has a new MAFFS program that includes highly motivated and knowledgeable C-130 operators who are attempting to grow their MAFFS program.”The building partnership capacity missions the MSAS conducts, not only enhance the capabilities of the partner nation forces but also furthers the objectives of the U.S. in building strong international relationships. This mutual cooperation and support will assist both the U.S. and partner nations in crisis response operations by enabling the nations to coordinate together.last_img read more

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In Memoriam

first_imgIn Memoriam March 15, 2006 In Memoriam In Memoriam William Merle Barr, Daytona Beach Admitted 1963; Died December 20, 2005 Mary C. Breda, Ft. Lauderdale Admitted 1979; Died April 12, 2003 Jerry D. Bryant, Wilmington, OH Admitted 1984; Died December 27, 2005 Sylvan B. Burdick, West Palm Beach Admitted 1949; Died January 1, 2006 Ralph Peter Cafaro, Staten Island, NY Admitted 1993; Died September 8, 2003 Darrel Carnell, Ormond Beach Admitted 1951; Died December 16, 2005 Susan J. Cawthorne, Lady Lake Admitted 1989; Died December 5, 2005 Marshall M. Chern, Coral Gables Admitted 1949; Died July 4, 2005 H. Tucker Cotton, Montgomery, AL Admitted 1972; Died October 11, 2005 Manuel A. Crespo, Miami Admitted 1977; Died January 8, 2006 Ralph C. Dell, Tampa Admitted 1945; Died November 19, 2005 Garry Charles Faske, North Miami Admitted 1987; Died April 30, 2005 Daniel Philip Galfond, Coral Gables Admitted 2001; Died November 5, 2005 Robert Wade Glass, Clearwater Admitted 1991; Died December 26, 2005 Michael Graham, Phoenix, AZ Admitted 1978; Died July 17, 2004 Robert Treat Graham, Gonzalez Admitted 1976; Died May 5, 2005 Jack M. Green, Tallahassee Admitted 1940; Died January 19, 2006 Judy L. Groover, Jacksonville Admitted 1989; Died January 10, 2006 Edward Ronald Heath, Jr., Mechanic Falls, ME Admitted 1988; Died March 9, 2005 Robert I. Kasten, St. Petersburg Admitted 1972; Died June 23, 2004 Raymond L. Marky II, Tallahassee Admitted 1964; Died January 17, 2006 Ray Mattox, Winter Haven Admitted 1955; Died December 29, 2005 Richard E. McGee, Sr., Brooksville Admitted 1954; Died December 15, 2005 John E. McHugh, Jr., Van Nuys, CA Admitted 1977; December 27, 2004 Edward John Olsen, St. Petersburg Admitted 1979; Died June 25, 2002 George B. Oujevolk, Sebring Admitted 1935; Died July 23, 2000 John A. Paul, Jacksonville Admitted 1934; Died December 30, 2005 Ira Paull, Del Mar, CA Admitted 1980; Died September 28, 2003 Jose L. Pelleya, Miami Admitted 1974; Died May 27, 2005 G. Keith Quinney, Jr., Tallahassee Admitted 1976; Died January 2, 2006 James Michael Rampe, Ft. Lauderdale Admitted 1998; Died October 20, 2005 James T. Russell, St. Petersburg Admitted 1954; Died January 2, 2006 Christopher Paul Saxer, Ft. Walton Beach Admitted 1986; Died January 11, 2006 John Vincent Thornton, New York, NY Admitted 1996; Died June 15, 2005last_img read more

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OnSite: CUES Symposium CEO/Board Exchange

first_img 23SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Randall Smith Randall Smith is the co-founder of CUInsight.com, the host of The CUInsight Experience podcast, and a bit of a wanderlust.As one of the co-founders of CUInsight.com he … Web: www.CUInsight.com Details If you thought that the CUES Symposium at Grand Wailea here in Hawaii was all fun and games – think again! The past few days have been packed with learning and priceless moments that couldn’t happen anywhere else.The team from DDJ Myers has been hard at work engaging both credit union CEO’s and board members in discussions that can help them keep up with the changing pace of the industry. The balance of this relationship is crucial, yet tricky. It’s important to establish early on who will be responsible for setting the mission and strategy for the credit union in the coming years –only then can you successfully tackle issues that you both face; such as diversity, outdated technology, compensation, talent and mergers. Clarity of roles is a key component and cannot be stressed enough. CEO’s and board members ask yourself this question: “In 10 words or less what am I responsible for?” This gives you a starting point for open communication moving forward.Another point driven home here was the idea of creating “priceless surprises”. With help from MasterCard, attendees had the opportunity to meet golf pro, Tom Watson. Credit unions pride themselves on being member-centric and while you might not be able to arrange a meet and greet between a celebrity and your members what you can do is create a moment that they will always remember. Take a moment to consider what your members really care about and what influences their lives – then ask yourself how you help them achieve something they never thought possible. What I love most about this concept is that it’s scalable; creating a moment that a member cherishes will earn your credit union more loyalty and more “word of mouth” points than any promotional campaign could possibly achieve.In a fast paced world where being in the grind seems impossible to get out of, I challenge you to make time to be honest and transparent about your responsibilities, skills and limits. I also challenge you to get out of your comfort zone and really focus on your members as individuals and not a sub-group of the community you serve: what can you do for them that no one else can? Let’s make 2016 the year that members will never forget!last_img read more

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Waxing Poetic: Northport Artist’s Paintings Are Like Looking Through Stained Glass Windows

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Batik, the ancient art of creating patterned cloth using wax that allows artisans to selectively dye certain areas of the material, is practiced in countries around the world, including Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, India, Sri Lanka, Philippines and Nigeria.A year ago, longtime Northport resident Emily Eisen began to experiment with the age-old technique to create impressionistic paintings, often reminiscent of stained glass. Eisen, who lives near Crab Meadow Beach by Long Island Sound, is particularly enamored with water. She said that what she calls “batikage” lends itself particularly well to representing currents and waves as well as the ice that coats Northport Harbor each winter.She begins by loosely using textile paints as she would watercolors on silk or cotton.“I like to track the movement of the flowing colors, especially on the receptive, absorbent silk fabric,” said Eisen.She starts with a light color palette, lets the fabric dry, and then strategically paints melted wax over the entire surface in different directions and textural patterns. Next, she waits until the wax-coated fabric solidifies, refrigerating it for a short time when the weather is warm.Then Eisen taps or breaks the wax by placing her hand in different positions under the fabric to create the variety of “crackles” that imbue each piece with its unique character.Darker textile colors are painted over the crackles so that they can seep into the fabric. Eisen then covers the cloth with newspaper, ironing over it to soak up the wax until the material is soft again.What is so exciting for her is that every stage of the artistic process involves elements of surprise and experimentation. Eisen is as much the artist as she is the audience, she says.Emily Eisen was inspired to use her technique of ‘batikage’ to create “Majestic Caribbean’ after a trip to the Virgin Islands (Photo by Alan Pearlman).“I discover what it will look like when I iron the wax out,” Eisen said.As she watches the paint  travel and the crackles in the wax emerge, she is entranced. It is all part of her visual journey, hence the name “batikage,” a mélange of batik and voyage.She finishes by embellishing her paintings with watercolor pastels, which imbue the surface with facets, highlights and deeper defining color, thus enhancing the dimensionality of the images. Finally the fabric is permanently attached to a canvas.“Silent Night” is an enchanting view of Northport Harbor and its dock cloaked in the solitary stillness wrought by winter. It showcases the pageantry of a glorious sunset whose jewel-like colors—fiery oranges and yellows, sapphire blues, and wisps of hot pink—are, in turn, reflected in the water. The eye is also drawn to the intriguing latticework of cracked ice, which adorns the harbor during the coldest months of the year.Viewers often comment that Eisen’s “batikage” paintings look like stained glass because the high-contrast crackle networks take on the appearance of the lead solder that frames the colored windowpanes.Eisen’s florals gravitate to the metaphoric and expressionistic. In her painting, “Hydrangea Burst,” one sees the suggestion of the delicate clusters of pastel petals that are the flower’s hallmark. Similarly, “The Butterflight Effect” and “Meadow Flowers,” are not realistic depictions, but rather playful and exuberantly flamboyant feasts of form and hue that elevate the spirit and cause one to marvel at the wonder of nature’s color wheel.“Majestic Caribbean” was the artistic culmination of a week-long trip to the tropical paradise of St. John in the Virgin Islands. As she basked in the sea, Eisen observed the  ebb and flow of the mercurial turquoise water throughout the day. Networks of intersecting lines and bands of vibrant color, which hint at the sea and the sky, make this creation one of her most abstract pieces.Eisen’s work has attracted an international audience. Although her originals are currently not available for sale, limited edition giclée prints can be seen and purchased at The Firefly Artists’ gallery, 180 Main St., Northport.last_img read more

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Activists warn government not to repeat mistakes of past economic bailouts

first_imgHe said that past corruption cases relating to government interventions to save the economy should be taken as a lesson by President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo’s administration.During the 1998 financial crisis, BI provided liquidity support (BLBI) to commercial banks to restore public faith in banks as they suffered massive runs, but most of the money was later found to have been embezzled.The Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK) brought former Indonesian Bank Restructuring Agency (IBRA) chairman Syafruddin Arysad Tumenggung to a corruption court in September 2018 for his involvement in the BLBI embezzlement case.Syafruddin was sentenced to 13 years’ imprisonment for discharging Sjamsul Nursalim, the owner of Bank Dagang Negara Indonesia (BDNI), from repaying the government. He was found guilty of causing Rp 4.58 trillion in state losses.In a July 2019 in a cassation trial at the Supreme Court, Syafruddin was acquitted of all the charges.The bailout of Bank Century in 2008, meanwhile, turned into a political scandal with lawmakers questioning the ballooning cost of bailing out the bank, which amounted to Rp 6.76 trillion. The House launched in 2010 a legislative inquiry into the Century case that almost led to former president Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono being impeached.In July 2014, the Jakarta Corruption Court sentenced former BI deputy governor Budi Mulya, the first suspect in the case investigated by the KPK, to 10 years in jail. The investigation, however, has since moved at a snail’s pace, prompting the Indonesian Anti-Corruption Community (MAKI) to file a pretrial motion against the KPK, which was accused of being “slow” in its handling of the case.Transparency International Indonesia’s (TII) Wawan Sujatmiko said the two past cases showed that Jokowi’s administration should start to draft guidelines detailing mechanisms to ensure any future economic stimulus-related policies are in line with prevailing laws before implementing the Perppu.“The government must ensure that amid the extraordinary conditions caused by the [COVID-19] pandemic it doesn’t become unaware or neglectful of potential corruption when it begins implementing the economic stimulus,” he said.Policymakers appeared to be determined to avoid any moral hazard in implementing the Perppu.“We are very aware that we must be very careful to avoid moral hazard,” Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati told reporters last week. “We will formulate a safeguard so that policymakers that are taking measures to improve public health and the economy cannot be criminalized because of the acts of others.”Center of Reform on Economics (CORE) Indonesia research director Piter Abdullah said a much better oversight mechanism offered by the KPK, the Supreme Audit Agency (BPK) and the ministry’s inspectorate general today would leave little wiggle room for policymakers to play foul.Piter said that unlike in the 1998 crisis, in which the BLBI funds came from the central bank, or in the 2008 scandal when the LPS funding was used to bail out Bank Century for fear of the systemic risks it posed to the financial system, the 2020 crisis playbook used a much safer route by leveraging state spending through the issuance of bonds.Topics : Antigraft activists have called on the government to be transparent in the disbursement of the recently unveiled Rp 405.1 trillion (US$24.68 billion) COVID-19 economic stimulus in order to avoid the pitfalls of past corruption cases in 2008 and in 1998.The government issued a regulation in lieu of law (Perppu) on March 31, allowing policymakers to take “extraordinary measures” to cushion the economy from the negative impacts of the outbreak. The regulation gives Financial System Stability Committee (KSSK) members legal protection to carry out their respective duties as long as those are done “in good faith” and with respect to existing law.The KSSK is a forum chaired by the Finance Minister, with members including the Bank Indonesia (BI) governor and the heads of the Financial Services Authority (OJK) and the Deposit Insurance Corporation (LPS). Article 27 of the Perppu stipulates that the funds spent by the government in carrying out such policies are part of the economic costs to save the country from economic crisis and will not be counted as state losses.Submitted to the House of Representatives on April 2, the legislation is still awaiting lawmakers’ approval.Indonesia Corruption Watch (ICW) activist Kurnia Ramadhana called on the government to exercise prudence in making any future decisions under the Perppu mechanism, given the impunity provision.“If there is potential for corruption, don’t allow the economic stimulus be a pretext for such offenses,” Kurnia said. “Don’t be hasty in taking any decisions that might potentially become corruption offenses.”last_img read more

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Grexit: Economic choice or political nightmare?

first_imgThe heated discussions over whether Greece should be allowed to write off its debt and what precedent that would set for the rest of peripheral Europe ignore a far bigger danger than just economic disruption. The alternative for Greece of EU support is quite simple. It has a thousand years of cultural linkage with Russia (and the Ukraine). At a time when the EU is struggling to contain Russian president Vladimir Putin and faces the very real possibility of getting sucked into a proxy war with Russia over the Ukraine, the EU needs to beware of bearing Greeks as gifts! A Greek exit from the euro would inevitably lead to an exit of the EU itself by a desperate Greece, led by a far left leadership that has strong sympathies with Russia at a time when Russian nationalism itself has become buttressed by its commonality with Greece through Orthodox Christianity. Moscow was known as the ‘third Rome’ – the bastion of Orthodox Christianity – after the fall of Greek-speaking Constantinople in 1453. Greece moving into Russia’s sphere of influence supplied with appropriate economic support would be a rational response by both Greece and Russia in the wake of a chaotic Grexit.The focus by Northern Europe, led by Germany, on the necessity of Greece’s sticking to austerity and debt repayment, come what may, is both misguided and hypocritical. To ‘extend and pretend’ that debt write-offs are not required and will not be tolerated is particularly bizarre given that West Germany had 50% of its debt written off in 1953. This was at the height of the Cold War, on the insistence of the US as it tried to develop a prosperous and stable Western Europe, strong enough to be able to stand up to the Soviet Union. As Europe faces a new existential crisis over Greece, that need to create a prosperous and stable EU strong enough to stand up to a post-Soviet Union Russia has become greater than ever. That idea should be the primary factor guiding EU decision-making over Greece and trumps concerns over the precedent it could set for Portugal, Italy and so on. Moreover, the years of austerity have led to real change in Greece. The corollary to the story of the Greek American millionaire is that, whilst he was unwilling to invest in Greece for many years, in 2014, he was more positive than he had ever been and was active in both private equity and real estate.Joseph Mariathasan is a contributing editor at IPE The ongoing Greek saga is not simply about debt – it’s about the raison d’etre of the EU itself, says Joseph MariathasanI can remember asking a Greek American millionaire at the height of the euro-zone crisis what he thought about lending more to Greece. He thought briefly and then said that, for the European Union (EU), it was like it would be for him if his son were to ask him for a $100,000 loan. As he explained, he would have been willing to lend the money if his son were spending it on an MBA or starting a business. However, if his son had said he wanted it so he could spend the next three years boozing with his buddies, he would have been somewhat more reluctant!That attitude has pervaded the discussions in Europe on what to do about Greece. There appears to be a generally held view that Greece falsified its statistics to join the euro, and that its politicians then used the access to cheap debt not to rebuild its infrastructure or invest in new industries but to bribe voters by spending lavishly on a bloated public sector and an unsustainable welfare system. But that dismissal of addressing Greece’s ongoing debt burden misses a far more fundamental issue that strikes at the heart of the raison d’etre of the EU itself.The EU is a direct development of the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC) established in 1951, just a few years after World War II, whose prime purpose was to prevent another European war. That rationale appears to have been forgotten in the debate over Greece. With hindsight, few would disagree with the notion that both Greece and the EU would have been better off now had Greece not joined the euro. But the past is the past, and the issue now is what to do next.last_img read more

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Yenda Flood Protection Scheme on the Way

first_imgFederal Member for Farrer, Sussan Ley, yesterday joined with Griffith City Mayor, John Dal Broi, to inspect the site for $1.2 million in works to help protect the Yenda community from future major flooding events.Funded as part of a Commonwealth/NSW National Partnership Agreement on National Disaster Resilience, Griffith City will receive funding for two projects to help with local flood mitigation.NSW Member for Murray, Austin Evans, said: “The project will provide additional discharge capacity to move and manage floodwaters, as well as providing relief for upstream farmers from damage to their land and crops.”Welcoming the funding, Murrumbidgee Irrigation (MI) CEO, Brett Jones, said: “The flood management works at the Regulator would enable MI to support the Council during flood events and enable a quicker return to normal operations.”Ms Ley also announced $120,000 in funding for upgrade design work on Hanwood’s pump and levee storm water system to prevent water from flowing back and flooding into the village. Griffith City Council will contribute a further third of the total project cost ($180,000).[mappress mapid=”24625″]last_img read more

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