Pizza Hut Introduces New Boxes That Actually Work As A Turntable

first_img2016 is the year of innovation, and Pizza Hut just proved that with their new high-tech pizza box. The fast food giant teamed up with electronics company Novalia, and together they’ve created a functioning turntable pizza box. That’s right, a pizza box that actually plays music.Using conductive ink, Novalia printed two scratchable decks and controls for playback, pitch, volume, and crossfading right onto the serving apparatus. Even more, you can recycle that battery-powered box right into your computer or phone using Bluetooth, then connect it to any DJ software for it to become your newest source for entertainment. According to Exclaim, exact details of the product’s rollout will be revealed on Twitter. For now, the boxes will only be available at a few select locations in the UK. So fingers crossed this strange, but wonderful invention expands to the other side of the pond.For now, here’s an instructional video on the new technology:last_img read more

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Right time for ‘end-of-life’ talk

first_imgThe vast majority of patients with incurable lung or colorectal cancer talk with a physician about their options for care at the end of life, but often not until late in the course of their illness, according to a new study by Harvard-affiliated Dana-Farber Cancer Institute investigators published in the Feb. 7 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.The researchers found that such belated conversations tend to occur under particularly stressful conditions — when patients have been admitted to a hospital for acute care. And the doctor who shares in the end-of-life care talk is often a hospital physician rather than an oncologist who has treated the patient for much of his or her illness.Together, these circumstances may deprive patients of the opportunity for extended reflection and deliberation that would have been possible months earlier, when the conversation also could have occurred under less trying and hectic conditions, the authors suggest.“Previous studies have shown that patients who discuss their end-of-life care preferences with a physician are more likely to choose palliative, comfort-focused care over aggressive measures, and [to] receive hospice or other care consistent with their wishes. But studies haven’t looked at the timing of these discussions, or where and with whom they occur,” says the study’s lead author, Jennifer Mack of Dana-Farber/Children’s Hospital Cancer Center. Mack is also an assistant professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School (HMS).The new study, which involved 2,155 patients with stage IV (highly advanced) lung or colorectal cancer, found that 73 percent of the patients had a conversation about end-of-life care with a physician, according to medical records or an interview with the patient or a companion. Among the nearly 1,000 patients who passed away and whose records document an end-of-life care discussion with a physician, the median time of those discussions was 33 days before death.Other findings pertain to the location of those discussions and the type of physician involved. Of the more than 1,000 end-of-life care discussions in medical records, 55 percent occurred in the hospital. Oncologists documented end-of-life care talks with only 27 percent of their terminally ill patients in the study.Data for the study was provided by the Cancer Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium (CanCORS), a multi-region, population- and health system-based study of more than 10,000 patients with lung or colorectal cancer. Researchers interviewed patients at two time points and analyzed their medical records 15 months after diagnosis.“It’s encouraging to see such a high percentage of patients had end-of-life care conversations with a physician,” Mack says. “There’s a concern, though, that so many of these talks are taking place late in the trajectory of the disease.”Previous studies had estimated that fewer than 40 percent of patients with advanced cancer had end-of-life care discussions. Mack theorizes that this lower figure may reflect that earlier studies didn’t record end-of-life talks that took place shortly before patients’ death.Other research has suggested that physicians may delay end-of-life care discussions because of a natural reluctance to broach the subject, or because it conflicts with physicians’ problem-solving, hope-giving image. While such motivations are understandable, Mack says, they may work to patients’ detriment if they postpone the conversations too long.Mack and her colleagues are planning future studies to examine the quality and content of end-of-life care conversations, and then explore whether having such talks earlier in the course of illness can benefit patients.The study’s senior author is HMS Professor of Medicine Jane Weeks of Dana-Farber. Co-authors include Angel Cronin and Nathan Taback of Dana-Farber; Haiden Huskamp and Nancy Keating of Harvard Medical School; Jennifer Malin of the University of California, Los Angeles; and Craig Earle of the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research.The study was funded by grants from the National Cancer Institute, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, the American Cancer Society, and the National Palliative Care Research Center.last_img read more

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Why weeping willows bend and poison ivy doesn’t

first_img Growing plant stems and shoots exhibit a variety of shapes that embody growth in response to various stimuli. Building on experimental observations, researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences can provide a quantitative biophysical theory for these shapes by accounting for the inherent observed passive and active effects. Credit: Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences The research is published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface.“We have combined, in one theory, a plant’s ability to sense itself and its environment while being constrained by gravity and its elastic nature,” said L. Mahadevan, the Lola England de Valpine Professor of Applied Mathematics, of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, and of Physics. “By accounting for these factors, we can explain the range of shapes seen in nature without the need for complex growth strategies. This, in turn, implies that the diversity of morphologies seen in your garden may follow from very simple causes.”Mahadevan and co-author Raghunath Chelakkot describe plant shoots as “sentient,” meaning they can sense their own shapes and the direction of gravity and light through mechanochemical pathways.When these pathways are triggered by stimuli, one part of the shoot may grow relative to another and change shape. The shoots of the weeping willow, for example, try to grow upward, away from gravity and toward light. But, because they are so soft, the shoots sag under the weight of gravity and cascade toward the ground. On the other hand, poison ivy shoots start by growing downward before turning upward.How organisms sense and respond to these outside signals is important to understanding everything from plant growth to human development.“Different organs in our body grow and take on their characteristic shapes by responding to both internal and external signals, such as gravity,” said Mahadevan. “We do not yet understand how large-scale shape changes arise from a combination of sensing and growth, and our study attempts to look at one example of this.”Mahadevan is also a core faculty member of the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard.The research was supported in part by the MacArthur Foundation. It is well known that as plants grow, their stems and shoots respond to outside signals such as light and gravity. But if all plants have similar stimuli, why are there so many different stem shapes? Why do a weeping willow branches grow downward while nearby poison ivy shoots upward?Using simple mathematical ideas, researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) constructed a framework that explains and quantifies the different shapes of plant stems.A stem’s ‘sense of self’ contributes to plant shape <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VSY1Non2NAI” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/VSY1Non2NAI/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a>last_img read more

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Berger recognizes National Volunteer Week

first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr NAFCU President and CEO Dan Berger is reaching out to member credit unions and their volunteers today in recognition of National Volunteer Week, which began Sunday and runs through Saturday.This year brings the 41st anniversary of National Volunteer Week, established to celebrate volunteerism and recognize its contributions to communities and economic growth.“Credit union volunteers are the foundation of the credit union cooperative spirit,” Berger tells member credit union leaders. “They inspire by example so that others are motivated to serve. As our industry proudly serves more members each day, the service of our volunteer leaders continues to grow in importance and relevancy.” continue reading »last_img read more

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Open the door to new loan opportunities without sacrificing security

first_img 16SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Brian Timson Brian has held senior management positions in the financial services industry for more than 20 years. Focused on leveraging technology to improve the way that companies do business, he has … Web: www.alliedsolutions.net Details Year-to-year, community financial institutions have become more conservative about consumer lending. So as to not open themselves up to additional risks, many of these institutions tend to only service consumers with prime and super prime credit. However, consumers with non-prime credit make up a solid portion of the consumer lending market, so this desire to stick with “safer” loans leaves quite a few loan opportunities on the table. And when many community financial institutions are dropping their rates to as low as 0% in order to compete with large national lenders for prime and super prime consumers, missing additional revenue opportunities for your loan portfolio is not a small matter.To compound the challenge, Millennials – who present a massive lending opportunity for financial institutions – are often considered non-prime (due to having little-to-no established credit or having outstanding student loan debt.). So while fear of unwarranted risks keeps community financial institutions from supplying loans to these “risky” consumers, new non-traditional lenders are stepping in to swoop up these untapped loan opportunities. Market disruptors like retail lenders (i.e. Costco), mobile lenders (i.e. AutoGravity), and peer-to-peer lenders (i.e. Lending Club) are finding ways to bypass the existing banking system, credit bureaus and financing requirements to lend to this highly sought after demographic.If your community financial institution is avoiding non-prime consumers you are likely creating three major problems for your business:You are missing out on an opportunity to vastly expand your loan portfolioYou are isolating some of your key demographicsYou are losing out on new streams of revenueThe best way to drive loan yield is to expand and diversify your loan portfolio, so you are not missing out on any major opportunities. A whole host of solutions have surfaced in the consumer lending marketplace over the past decade that offer to help community financial institutions adjust their lending policies and criteria so they may begin servicing a greater portion of the borrowing population. These offerings primarily consist of collateral risk protection programs, expanded loan channels, add-on consumer offerings and digital engagement tools.Once you’ve adopted a number of these solutions, you can begin to experiment with various packaging and marketing strategies to differentiate you from your competition, attract new borrowers and generate much sought after non-interest income. The options to take advantage of are ever-evolving, and the opportunities offered through these solutions are endless. If you want to attract new loan customers, you have to set yourself apart from a growing list of competitors. The only way to do that is to offer the entire marketplace something other competitors cannot: end-to- end service, at the low cost only a community financial institution can offer.Contact Brian Timson to learn more about how you can expand and protect your consumer lending portfolio: brian.timson@alliedsolutions.net.Interested in learning more strategies for competing with traditional and non-traditional lenders? Read our white paper on “Stop Handing Over Auto Loans to Your Competitors”.Interested in learning more about effective marketing strategies? Read our white paper on “Consumer Engagement Channels: How and Where to Get the Most Out of Your Communications”.last_img read more

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Spanish acquisition

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France’s ERAFP awards $400m SRI bond mandate to AXA

first_imgFrance’s ERAFP has awarded an active US-dollar SRI bond mandate to AXA Investment Managers Paris, with a view to investing around €400m over three years via the portfolio.The French public service additional pension scheme also awarded two stand-by mandates as part of the process, to Natixis Asset Management and CCR Asset Management.AXA Investment Managers Paris will delegate financial management to AXA Investment Managers Inc.ERAFP said the two stand-by mandates gave it the option of diversifying risk at a later date by activating them.  The pension fund launched the call for tenders for management of a US-dollar-denominated bond portfolio back in April this year.It said the award was part of its policy to broaden its investment universe, as well as in keeping with the values of its SRI charter.The mandates have an initial term of five years, the pension fund said, adding that it had the option of extending them by three successive one-year periods.The portfolios will be invested mainly in dollar-denominated bonds from issuers registered in OECD countries, and will be hedged against foreign exchange risk.ERAFP said the mandate-holders would mainly use a fundamental analysis of issuers and a technical analysis of the bonds to build the portfolios, in order to diversify broadly across sectors.They will also have to comply to ERAFP’s SRI requirements, it said.last_img read more

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Pre-war time capsule home sells for millions in sought-after Brisbane suburb

first_imgThe property is in an ideal location, just 2km from the CBD.“All of a sudden, two other parties also submitted offers, so we had three contracts on the one day.“The end buyer had the best terms and conditions, so we went with them — it was a really good outcome.” The adjoining property at 22 Abbott St, New Farm.According to property researcher CoreLogic, the sale of 5-7 Mark St was the top sale in Queensland in the past week.New Farm is a high demand suburb with a median house price of $1.7 million. This property at 5-7 Mark St, New Farm, has sold for $2.35m.Selling agent Peter Hutton of Hutton & Hutton Real Estate said the four-bedroom, two-bathroom property at 5-7 Mark St, New Farm, had generated a lot of interest and attracted three offers.But he admitted many prospective buyers found it hard to envisage what to do with the property, given its pre-demolition status and the fact it had a brick wall down the middle of the house. IS THIS BRISBANE’S BEST RENO? This property at 5-7 Mark St, New Farm, has sold for $2.35m.Mr Hutton said the buyer had been looking for a place to call home in New Farm for a long time.The vendors of 5-7 Mark St also recently sold the adjoining, century-old property at 22 Abbott Street for $3.36 million at auction to a local family who plan to renovate. This pre-war property at 5-7 Mark St, New Farm, has sold for $2.35m.A 1940s time capsule in the heart of one of Brisbane’s most popular suburbs has sold for $2.35 million.The unrenovated, pre-war duplex had been held by three siblings for the past 45 years before selling to a local family, who plan to turn it into their ‘forever home’. GET THE LATEST REAL ESTATE NEWS DIRECT TO YOUR INBOX HERE The back of the property at 5-7 Mark St, New Farm.That was until the lucky buyer brought an architect along with them one day.“The architect gave them the level of confidence they needed and they submitted an offer,” Mr Hutton said. This property at 5-7 Mark St, New Farm, has sold for $2.35m.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus17 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market17 hours ago“It was purpose-built as a duplex, so basically two apartments side-by-side with a brick wall down the middle,” Mr Hutton said.“For most buyers that was a hard intersection of pre-war and not being a typical colonial, so most buyers couldn’t kick in their imagination to work out what to do with it.” ANDREW WINTER’S PROPERTY SHUFFLE last_img read more

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Clean Energy’s first-quarter income slides

first_imgImage courtesy of Clean Energy FuelsClean Energy Fuels, one of the largest providers of natural gas fuel for transportation in North America reported a slide in net profit for the first quarter of 2018.The company reported a net income of $12.2 million for the quarter under review, dropping 80 percent compared to the $61 million reported in the corresponding quarter in 2017.Revenue for the first quarter of 2018 was $102.4 million, a 14.4 percent increase from $89.5 million of revenue for the first quarter of 2017.The company delivered 85.1 million gallons in the first quarter of 2018 and 2017. Growth in CNG volumes was offset principally by a reduction in LNG volumes due to the non-renewal of two contracts and RNG volumes for non-vehicle fuel that were included in contracts sold to BP.Deliveries of liquefied natural gas dropped from 16 million gallons in the first quarter of 2017 to 14.3 million gallons in the quarter currently under review. Deliveries of the compressed natural gas (CNG) on the other hand rose from 68.5 million gallons to 70.8 million gallons.last_img read more

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Ports in India Conference Kicks Off Tomorrow

first_imgThe Indian Infrastructure Magazine is organizing its sixteenth annual conference on ‘Ports in India: New Projects & Initiatives; Opportunities & Challenges’, on January 29-30, 2019 at The ITC Maratha, Mumbai.The mission of the conference is to analyse the key trends and developments in the port sector, discuss the impact and progress under key government programs, and showcase best practices and new initiatives being taken by ports.It will also highlight new and emerging technology and equipment trends and solutions.The conference will feature twenty distinct sessions:Key Trends And Outlook;MCA For PPP Port Projects, 2018: Impact, Challenges And New Opportunities;MoS Perspective: Achievements, Plans And Strategies;Private Operator Viewpoint (Major And Non-major);Customer Perspective: Experience And Expectations;Investor Perspective;Container Traffic;Liquid Bulk: Petroleum, Oil & Lubricants;Dry Bulk: Iron Ore, Coal & Fertilizer;Spotlight On Sagarmala: Progress So Far And Opportunities;New Greenfield Ports: Progress So Far And Opportunities;Opportunities In IWT;Focus On Coastal Shipping;New Areas Of Growth;Spotlight on Port Rail Connectivity;Emerging Warehousing and Logistics Requirements: ICDS/CFSs, LOGISTICS PARKS, FTWZS;Focus on LNG Infrastructure;Focus On Shipbuilding And Repair;Digital Transformation Of Ports;Port Mechanization And Modernization;Technology And Equipment Showcase.last_img read more

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