first_img Tesla Model 3 Easily Outsold All Other EVs In Europe In February 2019 Number Of Identified Tesla Model 3 Orders In Europe Now 27,000 Tesla Is #1 Selling Brand In Europe’s Electric Car Race In February Here is where Tesla sent most of the Model 3s this past month in EuropeFurther exploring Tesla Model 3 sales data in Western Europe, industry analyst Matthias Schmidt (schmidtmatthias.de) presents the registration numbers for 12 countries in February.As we know from the previous reports, the Model 3 was the top-selling BEV (18.4% share), while Tesla was the top-selling BEV brand. In March, results should be much better, probably more than twice as highTesla Model 3 Source: Electric Vehicle News As we can see from the chart, Germany and Norway are the top two markets by volume, followed by the Netherlands, France and Switzerland. There is a high correlation between countries with the highest number of registrations and highest number of orders.February, as the first month of volume deliveries, was just a preview of what is happening as the numbers for Norway alone are already similar to all of Europe the past month, with a few days to go still.Brief snapshot of how #Tesla #Model3 performed in its entry month in W.Europe in February.Top selling electric car across the region accounting for 18.4% of total electric car sales in W.Europe + accounting for 83% of Tesla’s total registrations.Source:https://t.co/JrJPrLdAAN pic.twitter.com/queZo8pv30— Matthias Schmidt (@auto_schmidt) March 26, 2019 Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 26, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

first_img Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on July 15, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Power Integrations, a manufacturer of gate-driver technology for medium- and high-voltage inverter applications, has introduced the SCALE-iFlex gate-driver system for IGBT, hybrid, and silicon-carbide (SiC) MOSFET power modules with blocking voltages from 1.7 to 4.5 kV.The system consists of a central Isolated Master Control (IMC) and one to four Module-Adapted Gate Drivers (MAGs). The IMC provides a 4.5 kV blocking voltage. PI is manufacturing a range of MAGs to service a variety of technologies across 1,700 V, 3,300 V and 4,500 V voltage classes.The company says its SCALE-iFlex gate-driver system enables easy paralleling of dual power modules and provides flexible system scalability with minimum development effort. The MAG is placed adjacent to the modules’ control terminals and the IMC performs all necessary communication between the MAGs and the user’s MCU handling functions, such as PWM commands, short-circuit and under-voltage failure reporting, as well as NTC and DC-Link voltage measurement.The SCALE-iFlex IMC and MAG gate driver system will be available in August 2019.“The SCALE-iFlex gate-driver system is optimized for the latest 1,700 V to 3,300 V rated power modules from all of the leading module manufacturers,” said Product Manager Thorsten Schmidt. “The system provides the ultimate in reliability for demanding applications such as wind turbine inverters, industrial drives and the main propulsion and auxiliary inverters for railway applications.”Source: Power Integrations Source: Electric Vehicles Magazinelast_img read more

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first_img Lost your password? A group of Vinson & Elkins and Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher lawyers said Wednesday that they advised Canada Pension Plan Investment Board and Encino Energy in their equity commitment to form Encino Acquisition Partners, a joint venture between the two companies that will focus on U.S. oil and gas acquisition opportunities . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook. Usernamecenter_img Remember me Passwordlast_img

first_img2nd Update: Power was restored around 11:30 a.m.  If you are still out, please call 509-884-7191.Douglas County PUD 11 am update: Crews found a blown lightning arrestor and a problem with the connection where the overhead goes underground. Repairs were made and we will be trying to reenergize soon.Original story:More than 1,100 people on the Waterville Plateau are without power after a 6:00 a.m. power outage required crews to de-energize the whole area. Douglas County PUD first reported an outage at about 6:00 a.m. Tuesday morning impacting 160 customers. At 8, crews had determined that an underground fault at Orondo Substation Transfer location was the cause. In order to make repairs, PUD crews had to de-energize the whole area served by the substation which included the entire Waterville Plateau and previously unaffected customers. There has not been a released estimated time that the power will be returned.last_img read more

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country To scientists, he is “Kennewick Man.” To Native Americans, he is the “Ancient One.” More than a decade ago, Native Americans lost their claim for custody of this 8500-year-old skeleton from Washington state, when a federal appeals court ruled there was no evidence he was related to any modern tribe. Now, after several false starts, researchers have succeeded in sequencing Kennewick Man’s genome. Their conclusion: The Ancient One is closely related to at least one of the five tribes that originally fought to rebury him on spiritual grounds.“This is great news for us,” says Jim Boyd, chair of the business council of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation in Washington. Boyd says that the Colville people, who provided two dozen DNA samples for comparison with Kennewick Man, are now discussing whether to reclaim the skeleton under U.S. law. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which currently has legal custody of Kennewick Man, is also studying whether to return the nearly complete skeleton—which was found eroding from the shore of the Columbia River in Kennewick, Washington, in 1996—to the tribes. When radiocarbon dating revealed that he was thousands of years old, a legal tug of war began between local tribes and scientists who wanted to study him, but ended in the tribes’ defeat in 2004.The findings are “ironic” given the long controversy over where the bones should end up, says lead author Eske Willerslev, a paleogeneticist at the University of Copenhagen. “The reason we can come to these conclusions is because the skeleton was kept for science,” and not reburied as the tribes had wanted, he told reporters during a news conference yesterday. “But the conclusions show that he was Native American in the first place.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Emailcenter_img Outside scientists praise the work, published online today in Nature, in part because it also offers clues to the prehistory of North America.Their excitement stems from the paper’s clear resolution of a long-standing controversy over whether Kennewick Man was really a Native American or most closely related to Europeans or other groups outside of the Americas. Earlier studies of the skull suggested that it was long and high in shape, most resembling that of Polynesians or the Ainu people of Japan rather than the broader, rounder skulls of today’s Native Americans. Some researchers had argued on that basis that Kennewick Man was part of an early wave of migration to the Americas and that today’s Native Americans belonged to a later, unrelated wave.For years there was no way to scientifically resolve the question, in part because tribes were able to claim many of the bones and rebury them, in accordance with their cultural practices, without genetic or other studies. But in recent years, two studies of ancient remains suggested that modern Native Americans could trace their ancestry to the original inhabitants of the Americas, who probably arrived in North America about 15,000 years ago. These remains included the 12,700-year-old Anzick child from Montana, whose nuclear genome was sequenced last year, and the partial sequence of mitochondrial DNA from the 13,000-year-old bones of a teenage girl from Mexico. Like Kennewick Man, the girl had a long, high skull, suggesting that skull shape did not correspond with ancestry. But other researchers found that study’s methods wanting.When Kennewick Man was first made available to researchers in 2005, several attempts were made to sequence his DNA, without success. But more recently Willerslev’s team, which also led the study of the Anzick child, was given access to a larger sample from a hand bone.“The DNA was highly damaged,” Willerslev told reporters, and the team was only able to fully read the genome an average of one time. Although this so-called 1X coverage is much less than the 50X to 100X or more now possible with modern genomes, Willerslev said that it was still enough to convincingly show that the skeleton is closely related to today’s Native Americans.Other experts agree. “Even 0.05 coverage is enough,” says Harvard University population geneticist David Reich, who calls the paper “exciting and impressive.”The team, which also gained access to DNA from the Colville tribe, found that the Ancient One is especially close genetically to that tribe and other northern groups such as the Ojibwa and Algonquin. Moreover, he is much more closely related to today’s Native Americans than to the Ainu and the Polynesians, the researchers conclude.To explore why Kennewick Man’s skull might resemble peoples outside the Americas, the team’s anthropologists also reanalyzed the cranium, comparing it to 1368 male skulls from around the world. They found that Kennewick Man does indeed resemble the Ainu and Polynesians—but that it still fell well within the wide range of variation of Native American skulls. Thus, earlier researchers “got it wrong,” says co-author Marcia Ponce de León of the University of Zurich in Switzerland, because they assumed that the individual features of the Kennewick skull represented those of the larger population to which he belonged. Genetics has now proven that assumption to be incorrect, Ponce de León adds. (The leading anthropologists originally behind this claim, Douglas Owsley of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., and Richard Jantz of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, did not respond to multiple requests for comment.)Connie Mulligan, a geneticist at the University of Florida in Gainesville, praises the study for demonstrating that “Kennewick Man is a solid Native American, which is the argument that always made the most sense.” But Mulligan disagrees with the politically important conclusion that Kennewick is most closely related to the Colville, Ojibwa, and Algonquin groups. Her reading of the data, Mulligan says, puts Kennewick equally close to some other groups in Central and South America; indeed, Willerslev his colleagues also conclude that Kennewick Man has affinities to more southern groups.Theodore Schurr, an anthropologist at the University of Pennsylvania, says that the relative closeness of the Colville is “somewhat surprising” given the long controversy over Kennewick Man’s origins, but that it probably reflects the early creation of local, genetically related groups that endured over thousands of years after the original peopling of the Americas.Although they originally lost in court, the Colville and other local tribes may now be able to reclaim the Ancient One under the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, which gives tribes the chance to bury ancestral skeletons. As a result of the new paper, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is now studying whether to return the bones, which are currently housed at the Burke Museum in Seattle, Washington, and cannot be viewed by the public.The saga of the Ancient One has now run “full circle,” says Shane Doyle, a professor of Native American studies at Montana State University, Bozeman, and a member of the Crow tribe, who helped bridge the gap between scientists and Native Americans during the sequencing of the Anzick genome. The skeleton should be “returned to his descendants and respectfully returned to the Earth where his loved ones left him,” he insists. Like members of the Colville tribe who cooperated with the research team, Doyle supports scientific research on ancient skeletons, “but the days of going around or above tribal communities are over.”As for the Colville people, Boyd says, “right now we are just basking in the moment.”With reporting by Ann Gibbons and Robert F. Service. 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first_imgThe adult tuatara reptile (Sphenodon punctatus, seen above) has no penis. But among amniotic animals—reptiles, birds, and mammals—that’s not even that weird. Many snakes have double “hemipenes” and ducks have spiraling phalluses that look like fusilli pasta. This diversity in amniotic genitals has puzzled scientists as they try to map out the evolutionary tree of life. The fact that the tuataras don’t have penises makes them a useful study organism because it allows scientists to ask whether the reptiles’ ancestors had penises and lost them, or never had them to begin with. Now, according to new research published today in Biology Letters, the last common ancestor of all the amniotes did, in fact, have an erectable phallus, and that the modern diversity is the result of evolutionary tweaks over time (not the separate evolution of different phalluses). The findings come from an analysis of Victorian-era tuatara embryos preserved on slides at the Harvard Embryological Collection. Scientists used pictures of the reptile embryos to recreate their 3D structure using computer software. The team discovered that, even though the tuatara has no external phallus, it grows the beginnings of one during development. At some point down the line this “genital swelling” recedes and the reptiles are born sans phallus. The embryonic development suggests that amniotic penises only evolved once, but that some animals have lost theirs over time. *Correction, 30 October, 12:21 p.m.: An earlier version of this article mistakenly referred to the tuataras as lizards. Although they are scaly reptiles, the animals are technically part of their own distinct lineage.last_img read more

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Experts worry that firing of director could impact the Butantan Institute’s dengue vaccine efforts. Brazil’s dengue vaccine in jeopardy Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Herton EscobarFeb. 28, 2017 , 12:15 PMcenter_img SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL—A promising dengue vaccine faces an uncertain future in Brazil, scientists say, after the dismissal of a prominent immunologist who has been overseeing clinical trials of the preparation here.  Last week, the São Paulo state government removed Jorge Kalil as director of the Butantan Institute, following accusations of administrative wrongdoing leveled against him by a former colleague. Announcing Kalil’s dismissal on 21 February, Governor Geraldo Alckmin praised him as a “great scientist” and said he wished he would continue to lead Butantan’s dengue vaccine program. Kalil told ScienceInsider he will decline that invitation. He denies the accusations against him and says it’s impossible to continue leading the vaccine program from outside the institute. “This is not an isolated project; it’s something that requires a coordinated effort by the entire institution,” he says. “I can’t accept something like this.”Scientists here and abroad have protested Kalil’s dismissal. Butantan researchers and staff staged protests last week, and the institute’s influenza vaccine factory shut down for a half day on Friday, demanding his return. In a 23 February letter to Governor Alckmin, Anna Durbin of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, Maryland, who led the initial clinical trials of the vaccine, wrote that the dengue vaccine program made “tremendous progress” under Kalil, and that this momentum may be “reversed by the removal of his leadership of the Butantan Institute.” Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country CAMILLA CARVALHO/INSTITUTO BUTANTAN The U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) developed the early version of the TV003 vaccine—designed to protect against all four serotypes of the dengue virus—and sponsored the initial clinical trials, which were completed in 2012. NIAID then licensed the preparation to the Butantan Institute, a state-owned biomedical research and vaccine production facility here, to further develop the vaccine and conduct clinical trials in Brazil, where dengue fever is an endemic threat. The Butantan-produced vaccine is now being tested at 14 institutions across the country, in a $100 million, phase III randomized trial sponsored by Brazil’s federal government.Stephen Whitehead, a senior associate scientist at NIAID who led development of the vaccine’s attenuated viruses, also wrote to Alckmin, arguing that Kalil’s leadership skills were “essential” to the program’s continuation and that his removal from Butantan could have “dire public health consequences for the State of São Paulo and Brazil.” “His ability to solicit support for sound scientific endeavors, develop the framework for their realization, and reach out for international partners is indispensable for the success and credibility of the institute,” Whitehead wrote.Brazilian scientific organizations have also lobbied on Kalil’s behalf. In a public letter to Alckmin released on 22 February, the Brazilian Society for the Advancement of Science and the Brazilian and São Paulo academies of sciences ask that “apparent political conflicts of interest involved in this crisis do not interrupt projects that are so relevant to Brazil and the world”.In statements to the press, the São Paulo State Health Secretariat stated that Kalil was fired because of “grave administrative problems” detected at the institute during this tenure—he has been director since 2011—and for not respecting hierarchy.Kalil believes his removal resulted from personal and political motivations. He says he will refocus now on his other appointments at the University of São Paulo’s Medical School and Heart Institute, where he is a senior professor of immunology.Alckmin has appointed Dimas Tadeu Covas, a professor of hematology at the University of São Paulo’s Ribeirão Preto Medical School, as Butantan’s new director. “I do hope the person selected to lead the dengue vaccine program understands the immense effort it takes to see a vaccine through,” Durbin wrote in an email to ScienceInsider.*Update, 3 March, 2:39 p.m.: In a 2 March statement, the Health Secretariat of the São Paulo state government declared that “the development of the tetravalent dengue vaccine and other research projects of the [Butantan] Institute will not be affected by the exit of professor Jorge Kalil.” It further stated that “Butantan will remain strong as an international center of excellence in science, culture and public health.last_img read more